In 1921, Chaim Weizmann practically lived on Pullman cars

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In 1921, Chaim Weizmann practically lived on Pullman cars
Posted by daveklepper on Monday, August 27, 2018 4:17 AM

Chaim Wezzman became the first President of Israel on 15 May 1948, reived an invitation from President Truman, and traveled from New York to Washington by special train on 17 May and spent the night a Blair House.

But his first visit to the USA was in 1921 to raise funds mainly to be used for draining swamps, irrigating the desert, and establishing new agrigultural settlements.  From his autobiography, Trial and Error:

A typical day's "stand" in American towns worked out something like this:  One arrived by an early train, to be met at the station by a host of enthusiasts in cars, who formed a sort of guard of honor to escort one through the streets of a still half-sleeping townr....  From the station, one proceeded to the hotel or city hall, to breakfast with anywhere between 25 and 50 notables, including, usually, the mayor. One listened and replied to speeches of welcome.  By the time this was over, it would be about ten o'clock, and the cameramen and reporters would all be ready, all looking for some partiularly sensational pose or statement....

One was lucky to be through with the press by eleven or eleven-thirty, and to find time to sneak up to one's room for a bath and change before the formal luncheon, usually timed for twelve-thirty, and seldom starting less than an hour late.  This was a long, grueling affair of many courses and speeches, and the guest of honor was invited to speak last, lest the public be tempted to leave, thus depriving some of the other speakers of their audience.  After this performane, one was premitted an hour or so of rest, although even this was seldom without its interruptions.

In the late afternoon came the meeting with the local workers, tea- and more speeches; then there was dinner, very like lunch, only more so, and the day usually concluded, officially, with a mass meeting at the town hall or some similar building.  From the mass meeting one was escourted by well-wishers and friends to the train, with a sigh of relief, to one's sleeper, and one awolk the next morning in the city next on the list to begin the performance all over again.

This went on for weeks and months with only minor variations,

My question:   If it had not been for Pullman cars, could the State of Israel have come into being?

I'd also hope some day to learn the itinerary and which trains he used

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Posted by Miningman on Monday, August 27, 2018 9:04 AM

Interesting. Today it would be by bus or plane but I doubt if it would change the actual structure of the each day too much, in fact I would say bus or plane would be more gruelling. 

This proves my point that it was completely unnecessary to have forsaken all the trains we had. 

Yes you could say the State of Israel has a definite connection to Pullman cars, as did many Presidential campaigns and trips and the elections and policies that followed. 

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Posted by Jones1945 on Monday, August 27, 2018 10:59 AM

 

Source: ABC News

This post reminds me of the relationship between Dwight D. Eisenhower and PRR during his election campaign and early presidency, the following records can be found in the “PRR Chronology 1951-1959”:

Sep. 14, 1952, General Dwight D. Eisenhower's 18-car Look Ahead Neighbor Special campaign train leaves New York via PRR to South Bend, Ind., on first leg of 4,000-mile tour. (Withers)

Oct. 16, 1952, General Eisenhower's campaign special runs over PRR from New York to Philadelphia. (Withers)

Oct. 17, 1952, Eisenhower's campaign special runs Philadelphia to Pittsburgh over PRR and returns to New York overnight. (Withers)

Nov. 4, 1952, Dwight Eisenhower (1890-1969) elected President, defeating Democrat Adlai Stevenson (1900-1965); Republicans capture both houses of Congress. (EAH)

Jan. 9, 1953, NYC and PRR move 2,400 soldiers and cadets from West Point to Washington for the inauguration of Pres. Eisenhower; 8 special trains of 93 sleeping cars. (Cinders)

Jan. 18, 1953, Pres.-elect Eisenhower travels from New York to Washington for inauguration in PRR business car No. 90. (Withers)

Jan. 20, 1953, PRR operates 42 extra trains to Washington and 39 extras outbound; 211 Pullmans stored at freight yards for crowds attending inauguration of Pres. Dwight D. Eisenhower. (MB)

Feb. 6, 1953, Pres. Eisenhower ends wage and most price controls, including those on railroad wages and salaries. (RyAge)

Nov. 12, 1953, Pres. Eisenhower leaves Washington for Ottawa via PRR-NH-NYC-D&H route. (Withers) Nov. 15, 1953 Pres. Eisenhower returns to Washington via PRR; last use of presidential private car Ferdinand Magellan by a president for 31 years; most presidential travel is now by air. (Withers)

Jan. 16, 1954, Pres. Eisenhower appoints emergency board to study dispute between railroads and 15 non-operating unions. (NYT)

Apr. 18, 1955, Pres. Eisenhower’s Presidential Advisory Committee on Transport Policy & Organization, chaired by Secretary of Commerce Sinclair Weeks, reports that the transportation industry is over-regulated; urges changing federal regulatory policy from the old approach of blocking railroad monopolies to one of managed competition; it proposes eliminating state commission control over discontinuing passenger trains and ICC regulation of contract and private carriers in motor and water transportation. (Rdg AR, Hoogenboom)

Sep. 24, 1955, Pres. Eisenhower suffers a heart attack while vacationing in Colorado. (EAH)

June 29, 1956, Pres. Eisenhower signs Federal-Aid Highway Act of 1956 authorizing construction of a 41,000-mile, limited access Interstate Highway system; federal government contributes 90% of cost of Interstates; establishes Highway Trust Fund. (EAH, UrbnMssTrnsptn)

Aug. 7, 1956, Pres. Eisenhower signs bill raising Railroad Retirement benefits by 10%

May 19, 1959, Pres. Eisenhower signs bill increasing Railroad Retirement benefits by 10% and unemployment benefits by 20%.

Sep. 9, 1959, Pres. Eisenhower rejects railroad management's call for a work rules commission as intruding on normal collective bargaining, which is to begin on Nov. 1, when old contracts expire. 

( IIRC Dwight D. Eisenhower or General Douglas MacArthur took the Broadway Limited eastbound to New York during Korean War, but I can't find the record again)

 

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Posted by daveklepper on Tuesday, August 28, 2018 12:49 AM

Thanks. My military service was during his Presidency, and he completed Army de-segregation.

He also greatly ameliorated conditions in the Diplaced Persons' camps after WWII.

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Posted by Jones1945 on Tuesday, August 28, 2018 5:19 AM
You are welcome! It is my honor to exchange ideas with you. It is hard to list all the great things Dwight D. Eisenhower have done to the country and many other places all over the world during or after the war, he was such a great man and deserved to be elected.
 
I believe there are more examples about historical figure and Pullman cars. I always hope that I can have a complete list of celebrities who rided famous named train in 40s, there must be many interesting but long forgotten "behind the scenes" stories.CoffeeSmile
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Posted by daveklepper on Tuesday, August 28, 2018 12:02 PM

Leonard J. Berstein, who succeded Tom Long as manager of D&RGW's passenger operations, told me that he served Jordan's King Hussein aboard the California Zephyr during the period when he worked as a dining car maitre de.

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Posted by Jones1945 on Tuesday, August 28, 2018 5:52 PM
That is interesting! the California Zephyr temporarily and unofficially switched into a “Royal Train”. Did the young King stay in his private car attached to the train?
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Posted by daveklepper on Wednesday, August 29, 2018 4:10 AM

Leonard did not mention anything about a private car.  My impression, and I cannot be sure about this, is that he traveled as a regular passenger, possibly even incognito.  The Middle-East was generally calmer then, and King Hussein and Golda Meir were meeting secretly, regularly, in the office of a London dentist.

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Posted by Jones1945 on Wednesday, August 29, 2018 6:55 AM
The private car thing was just my wild guess. This reminds me of a story told by a retired Pullman Porter John Tibbs in the book "Penny Streamliner"(page.54), a bunch of guys with Howard Hughes who was covered from head to foot with a sheet on a wheelchair took the Broadway Limited in early'60s.
 
I guess some, if not many noted person or celebrities prefer to travel as a regular passenger than being served differently. But Howard Hughes case was a bit different, he was probably very ill and choose to take an almost empty section of the Broadway Limited to Chicago and boarded the train almost the last minute before the train left the station. 

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