Jamaican powered boxcar

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Jamaican powered boxcar
Posted by Overmod on Thursday, March 08, 2018 12:38 PM

Does anyone here -- Mike McDonald in particular -- have access to technical details or pictures of the "market power wheel" built by Metropolitan-Cammell for service in Jamaica?

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Posted by wanswheel on Thursday, March 08, 2018 8:52 PM
Presume that’s MacDonald and not the Dooby brother. I can’t find motor info or a picture of it. Excerpt from The Journal of Transport History, March 2003 —— This 'dieselisation' of the railways had its early beginnings in 1939 when two diesel coaches were ordered from the British firm of D. Wickham & Co. But nothing more seems to have happened until 1963, when twenty multi-unit railcars with Rolls-Royce C6T Mark IV engines of 350 g.h.p. driving two axles on one bogie through a twin-disc torque converter were acquired from the Metropolitan Cammell Carriage & Wagon Company at a cost of £621,000. Seven of these cars were composite, each carrying twenty first-class and fifty-eight second-class passengers. The remaining thirty accommodated eighty-three second-class passengers each. There was also one special-purpose car, peculiar to Jamaica, known as 'the market car wheel', a modified boxcar fitted with seats and windows, to carry passengers and their goods to market.
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Posted by M636C on Sunday, March 11, 2018 12:06 AM

wanswheel
Presume that’s MacDonald and not the Dooby brother. I can’t find motor info or a picture of it. Excerpt from The Journal of Transport History, March 2003 —— This 'dieselisation' of the railways had its early beginnings in 1939 when two diesel coaches were ordered from the British firm of D. Wickham & Co. But nothing more seems to have happened until 1963, when twenty multi-unit railcars with Rolls-Royce C6T Mark IV engines of 350 g.h.p. driving two axles on one bogie through a twin-disc torque converter were acquired from the Metropolitan Cammell Carriage & Wagon Company at a cost of £621,000. Seven of these cars were composite, each carrying twenty first-class and fifty-eight second-class passengers. The remaining thirty accommodated eighty-three second-class passengers each. There was also one special-purpose car, peculiar to Jamaica, known as 'the market car wheel', a modified boxcar fitted with seats and windows, to carry passengers and their goods to market.
 

The standard Jamaican cars looked like this:

http://metcam.co.uk.nstempintl.com/1960s.htm

Scroll down for the Jamaican cars.

I assume the "market car" would have looked similar externally, possibly with different windows and doors.

The "first class" interior illustrated may have been for a Royal Visit.

Peter

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Posted by Overmod on Sunday, March 11, 2018 11:38 AM

Thanks, guys.  It appears iPhones autocorrect to fast-food spelling (I was amused to recall the old comedy routine about how you could tell the game "Trivial Pursuit" had come from Canada) as indeed I do know better.

 

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