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Convertible streetcars (and semi-convertibles?)

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Posted by daveklepper on Thursday, September 2, 2021 11:12 AM

Henry Raudenbush

Attachments5:48 PM (1 hour ago)
 
 
 
Nice pictures!  Did a bit of location seeking.
 
 
 
11385  I think I have to differ on this location, but it is a bit tricky.  Note the NY Connecting RR catenary bridge in the background.  Neither the NYConn nor the LIRR Bay Ridge Branch would be visible from the Canarsie loop area.  I think this is in the extreme back of the yards at Fresh Pond Depot.  In the satellite view, this would be about the location of the blue P parking lot area, backing against the LIRR Montauk Branch (out of sight down in an a cut) and looking over the tracks of the Myrtle Ave el (hidden in the grass, from the low camera angle), to the NYConn. 
 
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Posted by daveklepper on Thursday, September 2, 2021 7:54 AM

A visit of (now) Shore-Line Trolley's 4573 to the Canarsie Shore:

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Posted by daveklepper on Tuesday, July 6, 2021 11:18 AM

One of the Birneys of the type brought to the final ceremony as the closest thing to the cartoon's single-trucker immediately available.  3rd Av. leased these cars to Steinway.

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Posted by daveklepper on Tuesday, July 6, 2021 11:14 AM

Herewith:

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Posted by Overmod on Tuesday, July 6, 2021 8:26 AM

Tell us the story behind Fontaine Fox and the Westchester trolley line

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Posted by daveklepper on Tuesday, July 6, 2021 4:49 AM

At the same location, the Harlerm River Shuttle car that ran ever the 3rd Avenue Bridge to the wired loop under the Elevated structure across Third Avernue from the East 129th Street Carhouse.  The line was closed in 1940. when the 3rd Avenue Bridge was made one-way sourhbound, with the 1st Avernue bridge, that had been used by the Willis Avenue streetcars, made one-way northbound.  The Willis Avenur bus replaced both dtreetcar lines.

The tracks over the 3rd Avenue Bridge were retained until sometime in July 1947 for middte-of-the-night non-revenue car transfer moves.  

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Posted by daveklepper on Saturday, July 3, 2021 2:51 PM

From Jack May, unkown original source, 138th Street and Third Avenue, south end of the Boston Road line, with the entrance to the 138th Street IRT subway \

station in the background.

 

 

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Posted by daveklepper on Tuesday, June 8, 2021 6:15 AM
149th Street Crosstown, wire in The Bronx and conduit on 145th Street in Manhattan, was the last Third Avenue System line to use only Convertibles.  But curve-sides were gone a few months after this Spring 1947 photo, with  only straight-sides closing out the service, as seen on previous postings. 

 

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Posted by daveklepper on Sunday, April 11, 2021 7:47 AM

Back to Pelham Bay Pasrk and the north end of the "A" Westchester Avenue Line, with my High-School classmate Mark Steele at the trolley-pole retriever rope.  Perhaps some Pittsburgh-area resder will remember Doctor Mark Steele as a very successful physician.

Another straight-side convertable at the same spot:

When I took the above photo, I did not know the car had a previous spot as a news item:

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Posted by daveklepper on Thursday, March 25, 2021 12:17 PM

On West 145th Street in Manhattan, straight-side convertable 79 with trolley poles for use on 149th Street in The Bronx uses conduit current collection.  The 149th Street crosstown was the last  Third Avenue Transit line to use conduit, going bus in the late summer of 1847.  It was also the loast Third Avenue line to use conveertables, wit enough sec ond hand and home-buiolt steel cars to handle the remaining routes

 .

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Posted by daveklepper on Sunday, March 21, 2021 11:43 PM

Edited the photos in the previous posting:

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Posted by daveklepper on Friday, March 19, 2021 5:08 AM

 

Third Avenue Convertable, summer configuration, on the "C" line approaches West 262 St., Yonkers City Line, coming from West Farms Square, and after reversed, heads south on Broadway, followed by Yonkers "1" line home-built lightweight 343 from Waburton Avenue and the Hastings town line.  343 will go only as far as W. 242 St., northern terminal of the IRT Broadway subway line.

At left is Van Cortland Park.

 

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Posted by daveklepper on Thursday, January 21, 2021 8:02 AM

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Posted by daveklepper on Sunday, January 17, 2021 3:18 PM

West 181st Street & Broadway was the terminal for four Bronx lines, O - Ogden Avenue, with 301-series lightweights, U University, with 1201-series second-hand steel cars, X 167th - 148th Crosstown, anf Z 180th Street crosstown, both with convertables.  889 iis an older curveside, and 35 a newer straightside.  Richard Akknab inporoved my restoration work on this photo, partiuclarly brining out grill detail on the auto on the left.

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Posted by daveklepper on Wednesday, December 30, 2020 2:19 PM

180th Street Crosstown Z approaching Third Avenue; glimps of the Elevated's yard at the righy.

A 149th Street crosseown cae crosses under the Eklevated.

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Posted by daveklepper on Tuesday, December 22, 2020 3:40 AM

I should note that Richard Allman helped with the editing process in some of these photos, although in a very few isolated instances I departed from his advice.

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Posted by rcdrye on Monday, December 21, 2020 9:59 AM

daveklepper
But what about the rear-door treadle? Probably missing, removed in Vienna.

I'll look next time I'm in the barn.  What I remember is that there is a rear treadle, but the air valve to allow its use was normally shut, so it wasn't part of normal use.

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Posted by daveklepper on Monday, December 21, 2020 8:16 AM

But what about the rear-door treadle?   Probably missing, removed in Vienna.

Restored at Branford.

All my photos can be copied and used for any constructive purpose, but I'd appreciate the credit as photographer and approimate age, plus the website credit.

The north end of the A, Westchester Avenue line, shortly before ex-Manhattan lightweights replaced the straight-side convertables, under the current "6" line at Pelham Bay  Parkway.

The "A" was one of the four last Bronx lines, the otheres T Tremont Av., S Southern Boulevard, and B Boston Rd. (one of four TATS-TARS Bs), bus August 1948.

 

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Posted by rcdrye on Monday, December 21, 2020 6:09 AM

daveklepper
On Third Avenue onw-man cars, there was no close-door button. One closed both front and rear doors by depressing the foot controller. One closed the doors by depressing the foot controller. Tapping it lightly would close the doors without releasing the brakes or reducing brake ressure. One could re-open the front door by pressing the unlabeled. but unique, door-open button.

Seashore's 631 has the original door controls plus the Vienna "auf" and "zu", with the pedal interlock still in place.

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Posted by daveklepper on Sunday, December 20, 2020 10:21 PM

Straight-side convertable in March 1947 on 138th Street viewed from near the New York Central overpass and "The Bronx" 138th Street Station with the double-deck Third Avenue Elevated (also used by 2nd Avenue rush-hour Bronx trains up to June 1940) structure in the background.

138th Street Crosstown was the last Third Avenue trolley line to enter Manhattan,  running to 135th Street and 8th Avenue.  Shortly after this photo, ex-Manhattan 101-200-series and 391-400, newly equipped with poles, replaced convertables on this and other Bronx lines.

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Posted by daveklepper on Thursday, December 17, 2020 4:20 AM

I recall the door cotrols, both when visiting Vienna in 1960 and speding time with these old friends from New York City, and in operating 629 before full restoration at Branford, winter 1967-1968.

On Third Avenue one-man cars, there was no close-door button.  One closed both front and rear doors by depressing the foot controller.  Tapping it lightly would close the doors without releasing the brakes or reducing brake pressure.  One could re-open the front door by pressing the unlabeled. but unique, door-open button.  When making a regular stop, an operator could make a smooth stop, without lifting the foot off the contoller all the way, and then open the front door with the button; but most preferred to make the smooth stop and then let the pedal rise to maximium height, opening the front door.

The rear door was opened by the tredle in the floor, interlocked; only working with the car brakes applied and the car stationary.

This applied to all one-man Third Avenue cars.

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Posted by rcdrye on Tuesday, December 15, 2020 6:13 AM

631 retains bits and pieces of its time in Vienna, including "auf" and "zu" door control buttons.  I have lots of controller time on the car, but have never worked on it.  Photos seem to show full width doors on all corners, though there is a jump seat.

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:NY_Third_Ave_Railway_631_at_Seashore.jpg

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Posted by daveklepper on Tuesday, December 15, 2020 3:03 AM

Apparently installed in Vienna, not on 629 at Branford.  Does Seashore's still have the Vienna modification, prepared-for in the original construction but not implemented at TARS-TATS, full double=width rear doors , same as front doors?  I believe Crich, England. retained this change.

629 was faithfully restored to its last-days-in-The Bronx condition 1947-1948, paint slightly different than conduit-only in Manhattan, 1939-1947.  This makes sence because of pole, not conduit, operation.  This includes single-width, two-leaf rear doors, with the small wood seat where the second pair of door-leaves would be.

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Posted by rcdrye on Sunday, December 13, 2020 4:15 PM

TARS 631 at Seashore has LB2As installed on its K-35 controllers.  It may have acquired them in Vienna. Out of service at the moment with motor bearing issues (Seashore fund 864).

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Posted by daveklepper on Sunday, December 13, 2020 3:16 PM

I ran the TATS cars on the B ailey Avenue line at age 15, 1947, and was a regular operator of 629 at Branford *Shore Line Trolley) 1967 - 1995.  No special jiggling switch, and you can inspect the K-type controller on the 629 or its mate at Seashore.  The jiggling was by foot (I always used the left foot, because the operation is the opposite from the automobile brake pedal.)   The controller was left on one point of power and the foot clickrd the line-swith on-and-off.  A very safe procedure, because lifting the foot off completely would stop the car immediately.  I put 629 into its carhouse space at least a hundred times.

I mentioned the Times Square switch-tender with his mechanically linked lever.  There may have others, possibly at 125th and Amsterdam.  But lots and lots of switch control in regular operation was done with the operator leaving the car with his switch iron, conduit as well as wire territory.  I often did the job on fantrips, more often than not.

But Brooklyn had hundreds of power contactors.  I never got to run a Brooklyn car, except at Branford.  Did use the switch-iron there too, however.  No switch tenders in Brooklyn.

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Posted by rcdrye on Sunday, December 13, 2020 11:49 AM

TARS safety cars had a GE LB2A line switch controller or "jiggler" on the main controller that could be used to draw power for a very short burst (put the controller in first point and push the handle toward the "Off" arrow on the LB2A), but the brake pedal did have to be all the way down.

Did TARS use switchtenders in conduit territory? DC Transit had some power switches in conduit areas, but some of those were controlled by towers.

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Posted by daveklepper on Sunday, December 13, 2020 8:21 AM

I should have added that one cannot apply both power and brake at the same time n any PCC (or the 1914 West Penn interurban hand, magnetic track-brake, and regnerative braking cars).  PCCs have a toggel-switch that sends the right amount of line current to ground to insure the "power-on" position of the ooperator-controlled track-switch.

But Third Avenue one-man cars lacked such a circiuit.  It could have been added. 

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Posted by daveklepper on Thursday, December 10, 2020 11:39 AM

For power-off, power-on switch control. safe operation requires the abilty to apply some power and braking at the same time.  Most regular one-man safety-car braking systems allow this, with the left-hand usually on the power control and the right on the brake control.   But Third Avenue (and Omaha and Council Bluffs) used a combination foot brake-and-deadman's control that opened the line switch with the slightest upward motion of that pedal.  This did have the advantage of allowing the operator to inch inch a car forward for maximum use of carhouse space , by leaving the power controller on one-pont of power lifting the foot slghtly for fractions of seconds 

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Posted by daveklepper on Thursday, December 10, 2020 9:26 AM

RC:  You have the correct explanation.  Third Avenue. as far as I remember. did not use any streetcar-operator-controlled power switches.  BMT-B&QT used many.   At Times Square, 42nd Street and Seventh Avenue, a switch-tender was on duty 7/24 in a small heated wood green cabin on the northeast corner with a large lever to send Bs right into 7th Avenue leading to Broadway and Xs straight ahead on 42nd Streeet to 12th Avenue and the Central's Ferry.

Third Avenue did use lots of spring-switches on trailing crossovers for both regular and emergency short-turn service.

Back to the rear of the Kingsbridge carhouse:

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