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I was RICH!!!!

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I was RICH!!!!
Posted by 243129 on Friday, November 19, 2021 4:53 PM

My first pay stub for 4 days work, my previous job paid $52.50 for 5 days. I thought I became rich.

No photo description available.

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Posted by Electroliner 1935 on Saturday, November 20, 2021 10:46 PM

243129

My first pay stub for 4 days work, my previous job paid $52.50 for 5 days. I thought I became rich.

No photo description available.

 

hamb

The dollar isn't what it used to be. Remember hamburgers were $0.19. I used to work at a gas station washing windshields and checking oil while dispensing $0.25/gal fuel. This was in 1960.

Also, I do not see any State, local, Med, nor RRretirement deducts.

 

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Posted by BaltACD on Sunday, November 21, 2021 8:17 AM

Electroliner 1935
 
243129

My first pay stub for 4 days work, my previous job paid $52.50 for 5 days. I thought I became rich.

No photo description available. 

hamb 

The dollar isn't what it used to be. Remember hamburgers were $0.19. I used to work at a gas station washing windshields and checking oil while dispensing $0.25/gal fuel. This was in 1960.

Also, I do not see any State, local, Med, nor RRretirement deducts.

Railroad Retirement is shown being deducted.

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Posted by 243129 on Sunday, November 21, 2021 8:38 AM

Electroliner 1935

 

 
243129

My first pay stub for 4 days work, my previous job paid $52.50 for 5 days. I thought I became rich.

No photo description available.

 

 

 

hamb

 

The dollar isn't what it used to be. Remember hamburgers were $0.19. I used to work at a gas station washing windshields and checking oil while dispensing $0.25/gal fuel. This was in 1960.

Also, I do not see any State, local, Med, nor RRretirement deducts.

 

 

$7.39 Federal income tax $4.86 Railroad Retirement. No medical.

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Posted by Backshop on Sunday, November 21, 2021 6:35 PM

Please tell me that you don't have all your paystubs...

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Posted by 243129 on Sunday, November 21, 2021 7:39 PM

Backshop

Please tell me that you don't have all your paystubs...

 

I do right up until Penn Central took over.

 

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Posted by Electroliner 1935 on Sunday, November 21, 2021 9:59 PM

Not me. I moved to a retirement place and got rid of much more than I would have liked. No space. Sixty years of accumulation. Kept some OG's but back issues of Trains and other RR stuff, by by. Gave some RR books to museum.

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Posted by charlie hebdo on Sunday, November 21, 2021 10:54 PM

243129

My first pay stub for 4 days work, my previous job paid $52.50 for 5 days. I thought I became rich.

No photo description available.

 

Had a minimum wage ($1.25) job in summer 1964, one year after your check. 40 hours, gross $50.00.

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Posted by Backshop on Monday, November 22, 2021 7:36 AM

I had to clear out the house of an aunt and uncle who kept every paystub, utility bill, bank statement and tax return, all the way back to the 40's.  It wasn't fun.

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Posted by CSSHEGEWISCH on Monday, November 22, 2021 9:55 AM

My first summer job between high school and college was with the Postal Service in the summer of 1970, receiving the princely sum of $3.51/hour, plus night differential for hours after 6 PM.

The daily commute is part of everyday life but I get two rides a day out of it. Paul
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Posted by alphas on Monday, November 22, 2021 10:37 AM

My first part-time job (at 14) was at the then minimum wage--50 cents an hour.   My second p-t job (at 15) was at the new minimum wage of 65 cents an hour.  I really felt rich when I was working the 2nd one.   

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Posted by NKP guy on Monday, November 22, 2021 1:16 PM

   The US Inflation Calculator informs us that 1963's gross pay of $67.03 is today's $605.87, and the net pay of $54.78 is today's $495.15.  

   I've found that any teacher can tell you his first salary.  One former gym teacher and football coach told me his first job was for $1500...but he had to drive the team's bus to away games.

 

 

 

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Posted by 54light15 on Monday, November 22, 2021 3:53 PM

My father used to tell us about delivering the paper all around Oswego, New York in the 1930s. "For a lousy penny a paper!" he'd yell. A penny was big money back then, you could buy a newfangled electric cuspidor for less than 50 cents. Hell, new cars only cost 30 bucks or so. Hmm

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Posted by NKP guy on Monday, November 22, 2021 7:05 PM

54light15
Hell, new cars only cost 30 bucks or so. 

   I enjoy hyperbole as much as anyone, but Ford in 1935 was selling new cars for $475 (today's $9,589.76) to $575 (today's $11,608.66). 

   Still, I take your point...and agree with your dad.  (And one cent in 1935 is twenty cents today).

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Posted by BaltACD on Monday, November 22, 2021 8:04 PM

NKP guy
 
54light15
Hell, new cars only cost 30 bucks or so.  

   I enjoy hyperbole as much as anyone, but Ford in 1935 was selling new cars for $475 (today's $9,589.76) to $575 (today's $11,608.66). 

   Still, I take your point...and agree with your dad.  (And one cent in 1935 is twenty cents today).

I bought my first house in 1972 for $20K.  Made a commitment to my self that I would not spend more than that to buy a vehicle.  Had to break my own committement in 2003 whe I bought my Durango for $30K - of course I kept the Durango until 2018 (360K miles), I only kept the house until 1975.

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Posted by Electroliner 1935 on Wednesday, November 24, 2021 10:50 PM

Now you hit a memory. In 1952, I "bought" a paper route. The paper cost $0.05 each and I got to keep 1 & 1/4 cent per paper. Also had to collect for and pay for the papers. Took about an hour after school. Six days a week, rain or snow. No car, bike. The papers arrived on an Ohio Bus Lines bus that served our village. OBL's also ran some former Cincinnati and Lake Erie Interurban routes through Hamilton and Dayton. When I quit, I had to fight to get the "purchase" price" back. It gave me spending money but I sure didn't get rich.

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Posted by BaltACD on Wednesday, November 24, 2021 11:04 PM

Electroliner 1935
Now you hit a memory. In 1952, I "bought" a paper route. The paper cost $0.05 each and I got to keep 1 & 1/4 cent per paper. Also had to collect for and pay for the papers. Took about an hour after school. Six days a week, rain or snow. No car, bike. The papers arrived on an Ohio Bus Lines bus that served our village. OBL's also ran some former Cincinnati and Lake Erie Interurban routes through Hamilton and Dayton. When I quit, I had to fight to get the "purchase" price" back. It gave me spending money but I sure didn't get rich.

Collecting was the worst part of having a paper route.  Excuses, Excuses, Excuses.

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Posted by 54light15 on Thursday, November 25, 2021 3:23 PM

I never had a paper route of my own but I would do a friends when he was away. He saved all his money except expenses but made his real money lending it to his brother and two sisters when they needed it. He charged a LOT of interest to the point that when he was about 16 he paid cash for a new Hobie Cat sailboat. 

My brother had a paper route that involved getting up at 5am and delivering it. Needless to say, the bundles of undelivered papers built up at our house and the customers were not happy at all. My parents sure weren't happy about it either. He got fired from that job. 

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Posted by York1 on Thursday, November 25, 2021 4:40 PM

Backshop
I had to clear out the house of an aunt and uncle who kept every paystub, utility bill, bank statement and tax return, all the way back to the 40's.  It wasn't fun.

 

This is familiar to me.  When my parents died, I had to clean out their house.  They kept every record of expenses.

It was actually fun to read.  My mother handled the money.  She gave my father 15¢ every morning.  He would spend 10¢ at the coffee break and give the waitress 5¢.  This was all entered in a daily ledger of family income and expenses.

While it was neat to read, all those records got thrown away, along with a lot of other stuff that was important to them, but not to me or any other family member.

I don't care what your religion or political beliefs are.  Just use your turn signal.

York1 John       

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Posted by Jackflash on Thursday, November 25, 2021 8:31 PM

When I started on the RR,  brakemans job for a minimum day local paid $21.56      Yard switchman paid a little over $26.00

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