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Construction of San Francisco Transit Center causes 58 story high rise next door to start leaning.

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Posted by BaltACD on Wednesday, October 26, 2016 5:41 PM

aegrotatio
That's an interesting problem.  The progress of one of the stations being built for Phase Two of the WMATA Silver Line has fallen behind the other stations.  The contractor had soil problems and they had to drive a whole bunch of piles.  It went on for a few months.  Now they're drilling these large tubes into the ground. 

The pile driver looked like it had steam and smoke coming out of it.  I wonder what kind it was.

I believe Pile Drivers these days are diesel powered.  The moving head coming down to strike the pile forms a piston that is fed properly timed fuel to ignite the compressed air created by the falling head at the point of impact - what is seen as 'steam & smoke' is the diesel exhaust from what is in effect a single cylinder diesel engine.

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Posted by MikeF90 on Wednesday, October 26, 2016 7:54 PM

Per the latest article "Millennium Partners says they are identifying the best experts" (to mitigate the settling). Waiting to see what solution they come up with, popcorn in hand. Meanwhile, I'm not visiting anywhere in the fall zone.

Pile driving along side the existing building seems a bit dicey, and I'd like to see the compact driver that would fit in the basement. Surprise Perhaps some plentiful, deep grouting through a drilled hole under the NE corner (the leaning direction) would slow the tilting; experts, please weigh in.

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Posted by MikeF90 on Tuesday, November 29, 2016 3:29 PM

Measurements by European Space Agency satellites show that the building continues to sink into the landfill at the same rate, possibly more:

http://www.businessinsider.com/satellite-images-san-francisco-sinking-skyscraper-2016-11

An address like no other, indeed.

Links to my Google Maps ---> Sunset Route overview, SoCal metro, Yuma sub, Gila sub, SR east of Tucson, BNSF Northern Transcon and Southern Transcon

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Posted by blue streak 1 on Tuesday, July 6, 2021 12:44 AM

Florida collaspe causes new worry about Millennium tower.  That may cause worry for the new under construction Transbay terminal ?

Millennium Tower: Surfside catastrophe raises concerns about San Francisco's sinking building (msn.com)

 

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Posted by MikeF90 on Tuesday, July 6, 2021 1:36 PM

The new Transit Center has been open since August 2018, but I'm not sure about the interruption due to the steel defect found and since corrected.

The Millennium Tower spokespersons are not telling all of the history. The tower was originally designed as a conventional steel frame building but was later changed to concrete/steel to 'reduce costs' (hah). Approval of the change is still suspect IMO since the building is on the ocean side of the former shoreline. This area is mostly rubble from the 1906 earthquake cleanup, not sure how that compares to south Florida sand / limestone. The foundation steel pile 'fix' sounds good, but I still wouldn't live in a highrise building with that much concrete structure.

OTOH those buildings in Miami Beach look like more disasters waiting to happen. Concrete and steel rebar in a salt fog environment, now with added rising sea level issues. Color me out of there !!

Links to my Google Maps ---> Sunset Route overview, SoCal metro, Yuma sub, Gila sub, SR east of Tucson, BNSF Northern Transcon and Southern Transcon

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Posted by BaltACD on Tuesday, July 6, 2021 2:09 PM

MikeF90
The new Transit Center has been open since August 2018, but I'm not sure about the interruption due to the steel defect found and since corrected.

The Millennium Tower spokespersons are not telling all of the history. The tower was originally designed as a conventional steel frame building but was later changed to concrete/steel to 'reduce costs' (hah). Approval of the change is still suspect IMO since the building is on the ocean side of the former shoreline. This area is mostly rubble from the 1906 earthquake cleanup, not sure how that compares to south Florida sand / limestone. The foundation steel pile 'fix' sounds good, but I still wouldn't live in a highrise building with that much concrete structure.

OTOH those buildings in Miami Beach look like more disasters waiting to happen. Concrete and steel rebar in a salt fog environment, now with added rising sea level issues. Color me out of there !!

Throw in Florida's lax to corrupt politically inspired building inspections or the lack thereof - and anything above ground level is suspect for its structural integrity.

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Posted by Sunnyland on Tuesday, July 6, 2021 3:32 PM

not a place I would ever want to live, fear  of heights, but that is creepy. Just like the Hard Rock collapse in New Orleans, shoddy construction work.  Have a friend who works in construction and he said they did not give time to dry  concrete out and not enough piers to hold the building together. No thanks, I will stay on ground level. San Francisco used to never build high rises because of earthquakes and saw the Trans-America Needle on my last trip and earthquake proofed or so they said 

 

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Posted by timz on Tuesday, July 6, 2021 6:31 PM

The Millennium is a puzzle. Everyone says it has sunk 16 inches or whatever, but before they started the recent work on it you could walk into it, and you didn't step down 16 inches as you went thru the front door. You probably didn't step down at all. So has it pulled the surrounding sidewalk down with it? The sidewalk is still higher than the street, so has it pulled Mission St and Fremont St down too?

When I checked in late 2016, it seemed the sidewalk at the east corner of Mission and Fremont was 6 or 6-1/2 inches lower than it was circa 1990.

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Posted by timz on Tuesday, July 6, 2021 6:37 PM

blue streak 1
How is a 2 inch lean measured ?

If you hang a plumb bob from the west corner of the top of the building, at ground level it will be 1+ foot west of the corner of the building.

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Posted by blue streak 1 on Friday, January 7, 2022 8:16 PM

The confusion continues.  Appears that tower took a "sudden" extra tilt.  Pilig are scheduledtobe installed to bedrock. However 4 days lasped from piling excavation and grout installed.  Was supposed to be done immediately.  The though is soil  may have migrated into the piling?   

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Leaning San Francisco skyscraper is tilting 3 inches per year as engineers rush to implement fix (msn.com)

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