Trains.com

Who remembers the S.I.R.T.?

4174 views
40 replies
1 rating 2 rating 3 rating 4 rating 5 rating
  • Member since
    February 2004
  • From: Chesterfield, Missouri, USA
  • 7,214 posts
Who remembers the S.I.R.T.?
Posted by siberianmo on Tuesday, February 22, 2005 1:15 PM
Does anyone out there remember the S.I.R.T.?

This was the Staten Island Rapid Transit electrified railroad.

For those who don't know or care to know - I still will tell you that Staten Island is one of the five boroughs of New York City. For some reason, I still remember it being about 15 miles in length and about 7.5 miles wide - kind of shaped like South America.

Anyway, when I was a kid, that system used to connect the key towns on the island - mine was Port Richmond. These 3rd rail runners looked pretty much like subway cars - but everything ran at ground level.

I can remember my Grandpa taking me on trips to St. George, where the main terminal was located inside the Staten Island Ferry terminal. From there you could take the train to South Beach - which once upon a time was a great place to swim and enjoy the sights - even had a boardwalk and amusement park. There was also a line to Tottenville - the southermost town in the State of New York.

Everything I'm telling you took place in the 1940's to early 50's. As happened in so many other places, the lines began to dismantle. I believe the only one remaining is the longest leg - St. George to Tottenville. But - I really don't have first hand knowledge - haven't lived in that part of the world since the early 60's.

S.I.R.T. was a fun ride for a kid.
Happy Railroading! Siberianmo
  • Member since
    May 2003
  • From: US
  • 22,320 posts
Posted by BaltACD on Tuesday, February 22, 2005 1:45 PM

SIRT was a subsidary of the B&O and was the outgrowth of the B&O's attempt to tap the New York freight market. The SIRT was steam operated until New York passed thier laws eliminating the operation of steam engines in the city in the 20's. The cars used on the SIRT were designed to be compatable with one of the New York subway lines in antacipation (never realized) that the SIRT would be joined to the subway line. The SIRT also operated the Authur Kill lift bridge, which at the time of it's construction was considered to be the the largest of it's kind ever constructed. In the 1980's the SIRT was deeded over and incorated into one of the transportation agencies in the greater New York area. The operating management of the SIRT were offered continued employment with B&O within the structure of the Chessie System, most accepted.

Never too old to have a happy childhood!

              

  • Member since
    June 2002
  • 18,751 posts
Posted by daveklepper on Tuesday, February 22, 2005 3:40 PM
I do... Went to South Beach as a kid, AZrlington on fan trtip and Tottonville too.
  • Member since
    February 2004
  • From: Chesterfield, Missouri, USA
  • 7,214 posts
Posted by siberianmo on Wednesday, February 23, 2005 9:47 AM
There was a book, "Staten Island Rapid Transit, 1860-1965," by Silver Leaf Rapid Transit (nearly impossible to find today) that has since been excerpted on the net. Silver Leaf has provided, through the Third Rail Online, some great stuff about the S.I.R.T. and of course, pictures! Irvin Leigh & Paul Matus's Staen Island Rpaid Transit, The Essential History is available through www.rapidtransit.net. Check it out and go for "thirdrail" and you will ultimately find it. Also, www.forgotten-ny.com has some additional info. Click on "subways," then "SIRT," and you wll find even more!

Well, so far, that's three of us who remember!

Hey Dave - when were you enjoying the beach? I grew up in Port Richmond - traveled to St. George - transferred to the South Beach line back in the late 40's into early 50's if memory still operates well!

See ya!
Happy Railroading! Siberianmo
  • Member since
    June 2002
  • 18,751 posts
Posted by daveklepper on Wednesday, February 23, 2005 2:52 PM
I was born in 1932. My trips to the Beach via the single-car trains were in the late 30's and early 40's, with my parents. It took an ERA fan trip much later to get me to ride one stop further to the actual end of the line at that one-door long high platform station

Wentworth Avenue?

Up through summer 1940 we would board the 9th Avenue elevated at 86th Street and Columbus Avenue. I would ride the front car, being careful not to step infront of the motorman's inner window on the front platform, while Dad and Mom would be sitting almost anywhere. At South Ferry one walked on the same level from the elevated train platform into the Ferry building for boarding the upper deck of the ferry. St. George in those days had ramps so one didn't need stairs to the platforms. The old BMT-like SIRT muc-cars also permitted me to ride the front platform. After the 9th Avenue el was torn town, our trips to Staten Island decreased because of the less convenient access to South Ferry, involving a walk all the way to Broadway to catch a Soutyh Ferry local on the IRT's B'way-7th Avenue line.

Dad's lodge had an annual picknick at Grant City and that allowed more SIRT riding.

Then came my railfan circle trip, to Tottonville on the SIRT, across to Pearth Amboy on the simpe ferry, and back to Manhattan on the Pennsy.

My last trip on the SIRT was a return from New Dorp after visiting Richmond Cemetary to check on the grave of Bob Marcus, who had often crewed with me at Branford and who had worked running streetcars for both Third Avenue Transit and Los Angeles Railways. This was June 1996.
  • Member since
    December 2001
  • From: Austin TX
  • 4,941 posts
Posted by spbed on Thursday, February 24, 2005 6:40 AM
I lived by exit 117 of the GSP & had to commute to the WTC. Well their was a strike so I drove to SI hopped on the SIRT then the ferry to downtown NYC. [:D]


QUOTE: Originally posted by siberianmo

Does anyone out there remember the S.I.R.T.?

This was the Staten Island Rapid Transit electrified railroad.

For those who don't know or care to know - I still will tell you that Staten Island is one of the five boroughs of New York City. For some reason, I still remember it being about 15 miles in length and about 7.5 miles wide - kind of shaped like South America.

Anyway, when I was a kid, that system used to connect the key towns on the island - mine was Port Richmond. These 3rd rail runners looked pretty much like subway cars - but everything ran at ground level.

I can remember my Grandpa taking me on trips to St. George, where the main terminal was located inside the Staten Island Ferry terminal. From there you could take the train to South Beach - which once upon a time was a great place to swim and enjoy the sights - even had a boardwalk and amusement park. There was also a line to Tottenville - the southermost town in the State of New York.

Everything I'm telling you took place in the 1940's to early 50's. As happened in so many other places, the lines began to dismantle. I believe the only one remaining is the longest leg - St. George to Tottenville. But - I really don't have first hand knowledge - haven't lived in that part of the world since the early 60's.

S.I.R.T. was a fun ride for a kid.

Living nearby to MP 186 of the UPRR  Austin TX Sub

  • Member since
    June 2002
  • 18,751 posts
Posted by daveklepper on Thursday, February 24, 2005 7:00 AM
The SIRT mu cars were built similar to the BMT "Steels" or B-types. They may have been designed by Stillwell, known most for the Erie cars, but also designer of the BMT and Hudson and Manhattan and NY Westchester & Boston, and other cars. In fact, when the postwar administration of the Transit Authority could not get rid of wood elevated cars fast enough, still running shuttle service on the outer end of the BMT West End line during rush hours for quicker turn-around of the steels (Bay Parkway - Coney Island), some surplus SIRT cars were transferred to the BMT and operated if I remember correctly in Culver and in Franklin Shuttle service. Later, the cars remaining on the SIRT, reduced only to the Tottenville service that survives today, with North Shore- Arlington without passenger service (the tracks now being rebuilt) and South Beach ripped up, became unreliable and parts were obsolete and hard to obtain. So for a while some Long Island RR 1948-era mu's, replaced in 1967 by the first M-1 Budd high-floor-only cars, provided some of the service. Then came the modified R-44 long four-door-per side subway cars, which I think are still running.

On those early trips, including my solo fan trip to Tottonville and Perth Ambor, one still saw B&O camelback steam engines on freight trains. I imagine they were 2-8-0's but I don't really have a good memory. If any B&O fan has the information, please add your comments. And I do remember B&O diesels, and I think they were GE 77 tonners, but they may have been EMD SW-9's. Definitely switchers and not road power. On one fan trip a diesel with adapter coupler pulled the original mu's to Port Ivory. This was the kind of the thing John Kneiling, later TRAIN's "Resident Iconoclast" could arange. But that was one trip where there were no trolley poles for me to put up and pull down for him and the engineer or motorman. That was about 1949 I would guess.

If a ferry boat was delayed, the connecting trains were usually held.

There is a Kosher restaurant in the main Staten Island shopping center, called Golda's after Golda Mier, not the owner, I think. It has most an R-4 or R-9 subway car body inside and one can eat a Kosher gourmet meal in a New York subway car on Staten Island. The food is (or was in 1996) very good. It is not near any SIRT station (about a 20 minute walk from the nearest) but there is good connecting bus service both from the nearest station and from the St. George Ferry. It is not terribly expensive either.
  • Member since
    February 2004
  • From: Chesterfield, Missouri, USA
  • 7,214 posts
Posted by siberianmo on Thursday, February 24, 2005 9:56 AM
The responses are terrific! Just what I had hoped for ........

For Dave Klepper: I arrived on scene in 1938, so we have been around awhile.

Yes, Wentworth Avenue was the last stop on the South Beach line. Keep that info handy for a Trivial Pursuit game for New Yorkers! Just so you will have it, here are the stations between St. George to Wentworth:

Tomkinsville - Stapleton - Clifton - Rosebank - Belair Road - Ft. Wadsworth - Arrochar - Cedar Avenue and South Beach. Bring back any memories??

There is a great picture of a steam loco pulling a consist of wooden 'L' type coaches in Grasmere (1919). Take a look at the site I mentioned for Sliver Leaf Transit. Unfortunately, the angle taken does not lend itself to further identification of the loco (drivers, etc.).

Since I departed the Island in the early 60's - I don't have any info regarding great, or not so great, "eateries." I do know that in Port Richmond, there was one helluva Kosher Deli called Sams - on Richmond Avenue. The food was outstanding and the place was about 5 blocks from the Port Richmond station at Church Street. But you know .... Sams may have opened AFTER service was removed on the S.I.R.T. - hazy memory.

Insofar as the cars are concerned, this I know - the ones I rode were purchased in 1925 and they were 67 ft, electrified and required high-level platforms. Your additional info (and that from "BaltACD") adds much to the story. Thanx!

Regarding the transfer of those cars to the BMT - the info I found on the Silver Leaf Rapid Transit web site indicates that they saw most service on the Culver-nassau route and also on the West End Short Line and Franklin Suttle. In 1961, the former S.I.R.T. cars were sent the way of the torch as replacement R27 cars arrived for the BMT.

Did you know that in the great St. George Ferry Terminal fire (June 25, 1946) the S.I.R.T. lost eight cars with about the same number damaged? The ticket booth agent was burned to death in this disaster imbued in Staten Island history. Some speculation had it that sparks from an S.I.R.T. train started it all, but were discounted later as credible observations placed the sighting of the first flames at a location somewhat distant from the train terminal.

The new train terminal opened in 1951 - built by the city. Until that time, all trains had to terminate at Tompkinsville.

Your description of your trips aboard the El really brought back some great memories of me and my Grandpa. I had totally forgotten about the "level" approach from the ferry terminal to the El. Those were good times ....... As a native Staten Islander, I rode that ferry so much, that at one time I could have named all of them, colors included.

For spbed: Sounds like your a "youngster," but appreciate the info!! I remember lower Manhattan without the WTC and it is such a damned shame that the scene is once again that way.

For BaltACD: Forgot to mention this in an earlier thread. I had hoped to get employed by the B&O, but quickly found out what a "closed shop" was! Fortunately for me, I had an uncle in the trades (plumbing) who got me a union card and my first day of work commenced at 6 AM the morning after my high school graduation! I was so good at plumbing, that I spent the next 32 years in the U.S. Coast Guard! And believe me, plumbing had no bearing whatsoever on the things I did in my career ........ but railroading remained and remains with me as a real love, to this day.

Best to both!
Happy Railroading! Siberianmo
  • Member since
    December 2001
  • From: Austin TX
  • 4,941 posts
Posted by spbed on Thursday, February 24, 2005 10:25 AM
Well downtown NYC was known also as the steamship district & my career was in the S/ship industry. One of the companies I worked for had offices way up in the WTC. I was elected to be the fire marshall for my floor & was trained by NYFD how to lead my floor down in case of a emergency. If I still worked their on 9/11 I would have been fried as I worked higher up then where the 1st plane hit. I used to spend my lunch hours watching the WTC rise so I guess I can say that I saw the rise & fall of the WTC sorry to say. My normal commute was the North Jersey Coast Line to Newark then the PATH to the WTC. :D]



QUOTE: Originally posted by siberianmo

The responses are terrific! Just what I had hoped for ........

For Dave Klepper: I arrived on scene in 1938, so we have been around awhile.

Yes, Wentworth Avenue was the last stop on the South Beach line. Keep that info handy for a Trivial Pursuit game for New Yorkers! Just so you will have it, here are the stations between St. George to Wentworth:

Tomkinsville - Stapleton - Clifton - Rosebank - Belair Road - Ft. Wadsworth - Arrochar - Cedar Avenue and South Beach. Bring back any memories??

There is a great picture of a steam loco pulling a consist of wooden 'L' type coaches in Grasmere (1919). Take a look at the site I mentioned for Sliver Leaf Transit. Unfortunately, the angle taken does not lend itself to further identification of the loco (drivers, etc.).

Since I departed the Island in the early 60's - I don't have any info regarding great, or not so great, "eateries." I do know that in Port Richmond, there was one helluva Kosher Deli called Sams - on Richmond Avenue. The food was outstanding and the place was about 5 blocks from the Port Richmond station at Church Street. But you know .... Sams may have opened AFTER service was removed on the S.I.R.T. - hazy memory.

Insofar as the cars are concerned, this I know - the ones I rode were purchased in 1925 and they were 67 ft, electrified and required high-level platforms. Your additional info (and that from "BaltACD") adds much to the story. Thanx!

Regarding the transfer of those cars to the BMT - the info I found on the Silver Leaf Rapid Transit web site indicates that they saw most service on the Culver-nassau route and also on the West End Short Line and Franklin Suttle. In 1961, the former S.I.R.T. cars were sent the way of the torch as replacement R27 cars arrived for the BMT.

Did you know that in the great St. George Ferry Terminal fire (June 25, 1946) the S.I.R.T. lost eight cars with about the same number damaged? The ticket booth agent was burned to death in this disaster imbued in Staten Island history. Some speculation had it that sparks from an S.I.R.T. train started it all, but were discounted later as credible observations placed the sighting of the first flames at a location somewhat distant from the train terminal.

The new train terminal opened in 1951 - built by the city. Until that time, all trains had to terminate at Tompkinsville.

Your description of your trips aboard the El really brought back some great memories of me and my Grandpa. I had totally forgotten about the "level" approach from the ferry terminal to the El. Those were good times ....... As a native Staten Islander, I rode that ferry so much, that at one time I could have named all of them, colors included.

For spbed: Sounds like your a "youngster," but appreciate the info!! I remember lower Manhattan without the WTC and it is such a damned shame that the scene is once again that way.

For BaltACD: Forgot to mention this in an earlier thread. I had hoped to get employed by the B&O, but quickly found out what a "closed shop" was! Fortunately for me, I had an uncle in the trades (plumbing) who got me a union card and my first day of work commenced at 6 AM the morning after my high school graduation! I was so good at plumbing, that I spent the next 32 years in the U.S. Coast Guard! And believe me, plumbing had no bearing whatsoever on the things I did in my career ........ but railroading remained and remains with me as a real love, to this day.

Best to both!

Living nearby to MP 186 of the UPRR  Austin TX Sub

  • Member since
    February 2004
  • From: Chesterfield, Missouri, USA
  • 7,214 posts
Posted by siberianmo on Thursday, February 24, 2005 11:34 AM
For spbed: That's interesting about your connection to the steamship industry. My father had a long career with Waterman steamship of Mobile, Alabama. Most of the ships he was assigned to as 3rd - 2nd and 1st mates were out of Baltimore, although from time to time he would luck out and get a NY ship.

My direct connection with the steamship industry is somewhat oblique. My father got me an appointment to take the exam for King's Point Maritime Academy during my junior year in High School. Well, I didn't want to go - but I sat for the exam - two days worth. Senator Keating was my political sponsor. Anyway, I placed high on the secondary list and figured there was no way I would be selected. Well, I received a notice that because others on the primary list had declined their appointments - I was next. I attended an indoctrination weekend and that convinced me - I didn't want any part of that life! Especially with an entire year spent at sea (transferring from ship to ship to ship.)

My father was bitterly disappointed in my decision. Well, I "showed him," as I enlisted in the Coast Guard and became a commissioned officer 14 1/2 years later - stayed on for 17 more and retired as a Commander. Amazing turn of events - as life usually can be.

Best to you.
Happy Railroading! Siberianmo
  • Member since
    December 2001
  • From: Austin TX
  • 4,941 posts
Posted by spbed on Thursday, February 24, 2005 12:55 PM
Well I know the name Waterman. I was a office minion though except for sailing on the Queen's to Europe & taking a West Indies cruise I did not go to sea. I started in the biz as the gofer & wound up as a senior intermodal traffic manger. When I left I started my own biz between the USA/the Far East to Russia. Had offices in Moscow & St. Pete with Russian Russians working for me. To bad the Russian economy collapsed abour 5 years ago otherwise I may have earned enough to buy my favorite FB team.

I am also aware of Kings Point & who Sen. Keating is. From being aboard the ships while they were in port I would speak with the officers & ask them what it is like. They mostly said depending on the area of destination was their biggest concern as some places were unsafe. None though that I spoke to were ever concerned that the ship would be hijacked. I once worked for the company who operated the nuclear ship Savannah & besides being on board the vessel I also met the 1st mate who was a Kings Point grad & lived in SI. [:D]





QUOTE: Originally posted by siberianmo

For spbed: That's interesting about your connection to the steamship industry. My father had a long career with Waterman steamship of Mobile, Alabama. Most of the ships he was assigned to as 3rd - 2nd and 1st mates were out of Baltimore, although from time to time he would luck out and get a NY ship.

My direct connection with the steamship industry is somewhat oblique. My father got me an appointment to take the exam for King's Point Maritime Academy during my junior year in High School. Well, I didn't want to go - but I sat for the exam - two days worth. Senator Keating was my political sponsor. Anyway, I placed high on the secondary list and figured there was no way I would be selected. Well, I received a notice that because others on the primary list had declined their appointments - I was next. I attended an indoctrination weekend and that convinced me - I didn't want any part of that life! Especially with an entire year spent at sea (transferring from ship to ship to ship.)

My father was bitterly disappointed in my decision. Well, I "showed him," as I enlisted in the Coast Guard and became a commissioned officer 14 1/2 years later - stayed on for 17 more and retired as a Commander. Amazing turn of events - as life usually can be.

Best to you.

Living nearby to MP 186 of the UPRR  Austin TX Sub

  • Member since
    December 2001
  • From: Austin TX
  • 4,941 posts
Posted by spbed on Thursday, February 24, 2005 1:09 PM
BTW congrats on being a commander. What was your dad recreation to that accomplishment? [:D]



QUOTE: Originally posted by siberianmo

For spbed: That's interesting about your connection to the steamship industry. My father had a long career with Waterman steamship of Mobile, Alabama. Most of the ships he was assigned to as 3rd - 2nd and 1st mates were out of Baltimore, although from time to time he would luck out and get a NY ship.

My direct connection with the steamship industry is somewhat oblique. My father got me an appointment to take the exam for King's Point Maritime Academy during my junior year in High School. Well, I didn't want to go - but I sat for the exam - two days worth. Senator Keating was my political sponsor. Anyway, I placed high on the secondary list and figured there was no way I would be selected. Well, I received a notice that because others on the primary list had declined their appointments - I was next. I attended an indoctrination weekend and that convinced me - I didn't want any part of that life! Especially with an entire year spent at sea (transferring from ship to ship to ship.)

My father was bitterly disappointed in my decision. Well, I "showed him," as I enlisted in the Coast Guard and became a commissioned officer 14 1/2 years later - stayed on for 17 more and retired as a Commander. Amazing turn of events - as life usually can be.

Best to you.

Living nearby to MP 186 of the UPRR  Austin TX Sub

  • Member since
    June 2002
  • 18,751 posts
Posted by daveklepper on Thursday, February 24, 2005 2:20 PM
Was Clifton the station at the Junction where the South Beach Branch left the Tottenville main line? Also the shops were located there, I believe.
  • Member since
    December 2001
  • 973 posts
Posted by mvlandsw on Thursday, February 24, 2005 11:28 PM
I remember an SIRT Alco switcher working around B&O's Glenwood yard near Pittsburgh, Pa. in the late 1970's. It may have been there for maintenance at the backshop.
  • Member since
    June 2002
  • 18,751 posts
Posted by daveklepper on Friday, February 25, 2005 3:19 AM
Do you remember what model Alco switcher?
  • Member since
    February 2004
  • From: Chesterfield, Missouri, USA
  • 7,214 posts
Posted by siberianmo on Friday, February 25, 2005 7:49 AM
For spbed: I've always had great respect for those who start at the bottom rung and then work their way upwards. Sounds like you had a very rewarding career.

My father never knew of my advancements through the enlisted ranks to commissioned status. Last time I saw him was in 1958 - I was a 2nd Class Petty officer (Radioman) with orders to report to a 180 ft buoy tender in Kodiak, Alaska. However, if there is a "hereafter," no doubt he smiled a bit when the "news" reached him. Fathers are that way .......

Regards ........

For daveklepper: YES - you win the prize! Clifton was the junction. I guess the prize could be something like a lifetime free pass for S.I.R.T. travel - I'll see what can be done!!

Be talking to ya .........

For mvlandsw: Never knew that! I'll have to do some "surfing" to perhaps find some more info on the switcher.

Thanx!

DID YOU KNOW?

Did you know that the SIRT once had a spur to the Mount Loretto children's home in Pleasant Plains, near the end of the line in Tottenville? The spur accommodated steam engines and wasn't electrified like the rest of the line. Although the service ended by mid-century, the tracks were in place until the 1980s and the spur's junction with the SIRT was recently removed. (quoted from http://www.forgotten-ny.com/SUBWAYS/SIRT/sirt.html)

Thanx for the responses!
Happy Railroading! Siberianmo
  • Member since
    December 2001
  • From: Austin TX
  • 4,941 posts
Posted by spbed on Friday, February 25, 2005 11:00 AM
Thx for the kudos. My dad had left my mom when I was 5 so he to never saw my success. I am sorry for you that your dad did not get the opportunity to see yours as well. Yes controlling large bloc's of freight get you lots of perks & for a rail fan like me I really made sure to take advantage of everyone of them. I actually at one time used to rent a loco from Conrail to spot cars at our own private intermodal terminal. After the cars were spotted I had the loco engineer let my kids operate it on a trip from No Bergen to the bridge in Jersey City that goes over the Hackensack River. Their were many good experiences that sorry to say my kids say so what even to operating the loco! Good weekend to you [:D]


QUOTE: Originally posted by siberianmo

For spbed: I've always had great respect for those who start at the bottom rung and then work their way upwards. Sounds like you had a very rewarding career.

My father never knew of my advancements through the enlisted ranks to commissioned status. Last time I saw him was in 1958 - I was a 2nd Class Petty officer (Radioman) with orders to report to a 180 ft buoy tender in Kodiak, Alaska. However, if there is a "hereafter," no doubt he smiled a bit when the "news" reached him. Fathers are that way .......

Regards ........

For daveklepper: YES - you win the prize! Clifton was the junction. I guess the prize could be something like a lifetime free pass for S.I.R.T. travel - I'll see what can be done!!

Be talking to ya .........

For mvlandsw: Never knew that! I'll have to do some "surfing" to perhaps find some more info on the switcher.

Thanx!

DID YOU KNOW?

Did you know that the SIRT once had a spur to the Mount Loretto children's home in Pleasant Plains, near the end of the line in Tottenville? The spur accommodated steam engines and wasn't electrified like the rest of the line. Although the service ended by mid-century, the tracks were in place until the 1980s and the spur's junction with the SIRT was recently removed. (quoted from http://www.forgotten-ny.com/SUBWAYS/SIRT/sirt.html)

Thanx for the responses!

Living nearby to MP 186 of the UPRR  Austin TX Sub

  • Member since
    February 2004
  • From: Chesterfield, Missouri, USA
  • 7,214 posts
Posted by siberianmo on Friday, February 25, 2005 1:08 PM
Hey spbed - I meant to comment on the GSP in an earlier thread. Back in the days of the "gas wars" when the refineries made it so the prices were 17 cents a gallon (yes - that happened!) - I could take my '53 Studebaker for a weekend drive along the GSP. Aside from the "one arm bandit" machines, the drive was great!

Your kids must have some great memories - especially when it comes to real trains. I just can't imagine having the opportunity to "drive" a locomotive! Then again, not too many kids could relate to being taken aboard a freighter in Baltimore, bound for Long Beach, CA - then put on a train, and sent back to NYC in bedroom facilities. All when I was about 8 or 9 - kind of hazy with the year. Some memories are better than others and some last forever.

Good weekend to you too.

Happy Railroading! Siberianmo
  • Member since
    December 2001
  • From: Austin TX
  • 4,941 posts
Posted by spbed on Friday, February 25, 2005 1:22 PM
Yes I can relate to that as I keep books on every car I had which included gas prices.

I would not consider a joy ride s/bound on summer Friday nites or n/bound on Sunday nites

My sons impression at the time was oh well. They were not RR fans so the experience for them is not what it was for me.

I also rode up in a couple of DHRR shark nosed diesels. That was a real trip but I wonder what would happen if the tracks gave way & you are doing 60 per.

Since I worked in the S/S industry I use to take them aboard ships but alas that also bored them to tears as well. Proves that one person thing is not anothers.

Wow that is wonderful & hope that your impressions was better then my 2 sons. [:D]



QUOTE: Originally posted by siberianmo

Hey spbed - I meant to comment on the GSP in an earlier thread. Back in the days of the "gas wars" when the refineries made it so the prices were 17 cents a gallon (yes - that happened!) - I could take my '53 Studebaker for a weekend drive along the GSP. Aside from the "one arm bandit" machines, the drive was great!

Your kids must have some great memories - especially when it comes to real trains. I just can't imagine having the opportunity to "drive" a locomotive! Then again, not too many kids could relate to being taken aboard a freighter in Baltimore, bound for Long Beach, CA - then put on a train, and sent back to NYC in bedroom facilities. All when I was about 8 or 9 - kind of hazy with the year. Some memories are better than others and some last forever.

Good weekend to you too.


Living nearby to MP 186 of the UPRR  Austin TX Sub

  • Member since
    February 2004
  • From: Chesterfield, Missouri, USA
  • 7,214 posts
Posted by siberianmo on Saturday, February 26, 2005 10:10 AM
Hello sped:

The weekend is upon us and I'm STILL at it (?) - "Get a life," you say? Ha ha.

Back to the GSP - no joke about southbound on Friday and northbound on Sunday (evenings ) - slow 'n go, slow 'n go. I'd rather not know what it is like today! Used to spend some time at my girl friends parents cottage at Lavellette Beach - sometimes I'd take the train in lieu of driving. My recollections go back into the mid-50's - so I can just imagine what it all is like today.

Also in later years (early Coast Guard), I spent some time at Cranberry Lake near Netcong (I think). Great summer memories from there too - but alas, no trains involved!

Just wondering, do you get to Staten Island very much these days? I was back in 1981 for a 25th high school reunion - spent about 5 days there. Great fun seeing the "chums" and "gals" of my day (some I really had a hard time figuring out just WHO they were!!).

I had taken a USAF flight from Scott AFB in Illinois to Andrews AFB outside of DC then Amtrak (Metroliner) to Newark where a buddy met me. Driving over to "the Island" was very nostalgic and here it is 2005 (!!) and that reunion seems like yeserday.

If I have any regrets about my time there in 1981 it was that I never rode the train to Tottenville! Don't know why - don't even think I gave it a bit of thought. Shame on me.

Another DID YOU KNOW?

South Beach Plus One. Though South Beach was nominally the last stop on the branch of the same name, passengers could be carried an additional station to Wentworth Avenue, undoubtedly the shortest rapid transit station passenger station in the world. Its platform accomodated a single door of one car. (from http://www.forgotten-ny.com/SUBWAYS/SIRT/sirt.html) Long live the memories of the S.I.R.T.!!


Well, time for weekend chores ......

Be talkin' to ya.

Happy Railroading! Siberianmo
  • Member since
    December 2001
  • From: Austin TX
  • 4,941 posts
Posted by spbed on Saturday, February 26, 2005 2:39 PM
Sorry no I now live some distance from the NY/NJ area. The closet I have gotten to SI recently was last Dec when I visited my younger son outside Philly.

I would presume the traffic has to be worse now then some years ago.

We moved from Queens to NJ in July of 69 a very short few days before Armstrong foot hit the moon. I was also in my glory since the NYJs were SB champs & the NYMs were BB champs.

In the mid 50s I was to young to drive yet.

We all have regrets of things that we should have done or seen but did not.

I am not so familar with the SIRT history all I know it existed & help me out in a pinch.

Right now my thinking mode is do whatever make me happy as tommorrow you may not be abple to accomplish your wish.

I am typing this from my sons home while I am watching one of his kids.

I go railfanning every year & this year so far I will be in Utah, Wy, Idaho, Montana, Texas & NM. [:D]




QUOTE: Originally posted by siberianmo

Hello sped:

The weekend is upon us and I'm STILL at it (?) - "Get a life," you say? Ha ha.

Back to the GSP - no joke about southbound on Friday and northbound on Sunday (evenings ) - slow 'n go, slow 'n go. I'd rather not know what it is like today! Used to spend some time at my girl friends parents cottage at Lavellette Beach - sometimes I'd take the train in lieu of driving. My recollections go back into the mid-50's - so I can just imagine what it all is like today.

Also in later years (early Coast Guard), I spent some time at Cranberry Lake near Netcong (I think). Great summer memories from there too - but alas, no trains involved!

Just wondering, do you get to Staten Island very much these days? I was back in 1981 for a 25th high school reunion - spent about 5 days there. Great fun seeing the "chums" and "gals" of my day (some I really had a hard time figuring out just WHO they were!!).

I had taken a USAF flight from Scott AFB in Illinois to Andrews AFB outside of DC then Amtrak (Metroliner) to Newark where a buddy met me. Driving over to "the Island" was very nostalgic and here it is 2005 (!!) and that reunion seems like yeserday.

If I have any regrets about my time there in 1981 it was that I never rode the train to Tottenville! Don't know why - don't even think I gave it a bit of thought. Shame on me.

Another DID YOU KNOW?

South Beach Plus One. Though South Beach was nominally the last stop on the branch of the same name, passengers could be carried an additional station to Wentworth Avenue, undoubtedly the shortest rapid transit station passenger station in the world. Its platform accomodated a single door of one car. (from http://www.forgotten-ny.com/SUBWAYS/SIRT/sirt.html) Long live the memories of the S.I.R.T.!!


Well, time for weekend chores ......

Be talkin' to ya.


Living nearby to MP 186 of the UPRR  Austin TX Sub

  • Member since
    February 2004
  • From: Chesterfield, Missouri, USA
  • 7,214 posts
Posted by siberianmo on Sunday, February 27, 2005 9:24 AM
For sped:

I surely can relate to the way you feel about doing today that which you may not be able to do tomorrow ..... that sounds very much like me!

When I get away for my solo rail trips they are pretty much restricted to within Missouri (round trip to KCity or JeffCity and back to Kirkwood (closest to my home, which is the first station westbound out of St. Louis). I also "do" a round trip between Montreal and a place called Sackville, New Brunswick, Canada aboard VIA Rail. I have a friend there and it turns out that Sackville just happens to be a "turn around" place for my weekend getaway.

The eastbound (destination Halifax) drops me off at about 12:30 PM and after about a four hour rendezvous with my friend and his family, I board the westbound (destination Montreal) for the completion of my two nights aboard the "Ocean" in a bedroom (of course!). I ensure that my bookings provide me wth at least one segment in the Budd stainless steel beauties, as VIA has replaced most of the equipment with their new "Euro" Renaissance cars. Not my cup of tea, to say the least. Just LOVE those Observation Dome cars (Park Cars) bringing up the rear of the train ..... dining cars are equally appealing as are the accommodations.

Anyway - all the aforementioned in response to your comment about railfanning, except I've been pretty much a solo act.

My wife and I will be traveling to Halifax this May and we booked the round trip for the Budd cars - cannot wait for this trip to commence! Have you ever been to either place - Montreal or Halifax? In my opinion, Montreal's Central Station is a really interesting place to "people watch" as the main waiting room is always chock full of people scurrying about to and from the Metro (subway) or connecting trains or ....... Kind of a European flare to it all with the chimes before the train boarding announcements in French and English. I could go on and on ....... The trains are one level below and inaccessible for picture taking, at least until boarding time. The Halifax station has its own charm and it isn't difficult to get to take some pictures outside along the train platforms.

Hey! This is supposed to be about the S.I.R.T. - well I guess we've exhaused what there is to be said - unless some new blood adds some info .....

Bon jour!
Happy Railroading! Siberianmo
  • Member since
    December 2001
  • From: Austin TX
  • 4,941 posts
Posted by spbed on Sunday, February 27, 2005 1:55 PM
I prefer a car to get where I want to go. Other then my wife I also run solo. I am not much for rail train trips. I guess all those overniters from St. Pete to Moscow that I took took riding a train love out of me. OK so if I dial up Missouri as my destination then I can dial U up. I have a tape that I got from Pentex of Gibbon Jct NE which is in your area sort of. If it is what I think it is I will have to get their to insure I know I eyeballed it.

Enjoy your Canadian trip.

As a aside when I was in Dagget last year I met a trainfan couple from England. The same at the T. Loop when I was their. At Dolton IL I met trainfans from Germany. [:D]



QUOTE: Originally posted by siberianmo

For sped:

I surely can relate to the way you feel about doing today that which you may not be able to do tomorrow ..... that sounds very much like me!

When I get away for my solo rail trips they are pretty much restricted to within Missouri (round trip to KCity or JeffCity and back to Kirkwood (closest to my home, which is the first station westbound out of St. Louis). I also "do" a round trip between Montreal and a place called Sackville, New Brunswick, Canada aboard VIA Rail. I have a friend there and it turns out that Sackville just happens to be a "turn around" place for my weekend getaway.

The eastbound (destination Halifax) drops me off at about 12:30 PM and after about a four hour rendezvous with my friend and his family, I board the westbound (destination Montreal) for the completion of my two nights aboard the "Ocean" in a bedroom (of course!). I ensure that my bookings provide me wth at least one segment in the Budd stainless steel beauties, as VIA has replaced most of the equipment with their new "Euro" Renaissance cars. Not my cup of tea, to say the least. Just LOVE those Observation Dome cars (Park Cars) bringing up the rear of the train ..... dining cars are equally appealing as are the accommodations.

Anyway - all the aforementioned in response to your comment about railfanning, except I've been pretty much a solo act.

My wife and I will be traveling to Halifax this May and we booked the round trip for the Budd cars - cannot wait for this trip to commence! Have you ever been to either place - Montreal or Halifax? In my opinion, Montreal's Central Station is a really interesting place to "people watch" as the main waiting room is always chock full of people scurrying about to and from the Metro (subway) or connecting trains or ....... Kind of a European flare to it all with the chimes before the train boarding announcements in French and English. I could go on and on ....... The trains are one level below and inaccessible for picture taking, at least until boarding time. The Halifax station has its own charm and it isn't difficult to get to take some pictures outside along the train platforms.

Hey! This is supposed to be about the S.I.R.T. - well I guess we've exhaused what there is to be said - unless some new blood adds some info .....

Bon jour!

Living nearby to MP 186 of the UPRR  Austin TX Sub

  • Member since
    June 2002
  • 18,751 posts
Posted by daveklepper on Thursday, December 23, 2021 4:43 AM

Apparently, files over 20 years old, are deleted.  i had additional old negative scanned, but apparently the old thread I had started on SIRT is not available.  So here are tthree recently scanned photos, and then some I probably posted long ago.

Fan trip, prlobably Tottenville:

Passing Clifton Shops:

 

Wentworth Avenue, was N. America's smallest high-platform station:

RoW near Clifton:

 

Grant City:

 

  • Member since
    June 2002
  • 18,751 posts
Posted by daveklepper on Thursday, December 23, 2021 9:30 AM

St. George Terminal:

Rail-Grinder at Clifton Sgops:

Inside Clifton Shops:

 

 

Crane at Clifton Shops:

 

Arligton:

  • Member since
    September 2003
  • 18,724 posts
Posted by Overmod on Thursday, December 23, 2021 11:13 AM

I still think it is a shame "Hylan's Holes" were not built. Aside from the promise of additional liner berths both on Staten Island and across in Brooklyn (see the PRR trains from Penn Station via the Bay Ridge part of the NYCR) the Narrows tunnel... intentionally planned oversize to freight clearances at the end, which was probably a factor that got it killed in the end... would have come out at near right angles to Bay Ridge, and a pretty direct connection both to the LIRR and to Penn Station.  That would give a double-track line from New Jersey south of most congestion right around to the New Haven east via Hell Gate.

All that expensive grade separation and third rail was almost certainly built with an eye toward running SIRT trains to the rest of Greater NYC.

  • Member since
    May 2003
  • From: US
  • 22,320 posts
Posted by BaltACD on Thursday, December 23, 2021 4:39 PM

Never too old to have a happy childhood!

              

  • Member since
    June 2002
  • 18,751 posts
Posted by daveklepper on Friday, December 24, 2021 4:34 AM

In time for your Holiday, more SIRT from that Kneiling fan-trip.

Another view at Arlington:

And the diesel switcher brought os to Port Ivory:

 St. GeorgecTunnels

 

  Exterior of Clifton Shops:

 

  • Member since
    June 2002
  • 18,751 posts
Posted by daveklepper on Sunday, December 26, 2021 9:01 AM

More ouside the  shop:

Connecting tracks at the St. George Terminal throatL

At a Terminal platform:

American Dock had its  owm switcher and had somwe tracks with trolley wire: 

 

  • Member since
    December 2021
  • 13 posts
Posted by roundstick on Tuesday, December 28, 2021 2:56 PM

3 branches on the Island one in use to Tottenville..Line to Arlington abandoned in place and tthe other to South Beach ILegaly taken by developors 

Join our Community!

Our community is FREE to join. To participate you must either login or register for an account.

Search the Community

Newsletter Sign-Up

By signing up you may also receive occasional reader surveys and special offers from Trains magazine.Please view our privacy policy