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Impressive Video

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Impressive Video
Posted by Pauley on Sunday, December 26, 2021 3:53 PM

I'm not sure if there is a special place around here to link neat videos, but I just came across this and though it was impressive - wanted to share:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zPJgrd43OiA

 

Pauley

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Posted by Backshop on Sunday, December 26, 2021 4:07 PM

That video shows speed but this one shows power!  Thank goodness for AC traction motors! This is my favorite RR video.

3 EMD SD70ACEs up front restart 12,000 ton train on a 2% Grade, Moffat Tunnel Subdivision, Colorado - YouTube

 

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Posted by BaltACD on Sunday, December 26, 2021 4:34 PM

Pauley
I'm not sure if there is a special place around here to link neat videos, but I just came across this and though it was impressive - wanted to share:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zPJgrd43OiA 

Pauley

Reminds me of working the 3rd trick Operators position at North Vernon, IN.  B&O trains had to make at Statutory Stop for a NYC branch that crossed at grade.  Eastbound was slightly down grade.  

The Operator's job included handing up Train Orders.  Handing up to the Eastbound's head end was no problem as the engines would pass the station at about 10 MPH - with all the engines in the 8th notch.  The trick was to locate the markers on the caboose - as Train Orders also needed to be handed up to the Conductor and the rear end crew.  By the time the caboose of a Trailer Jet was pounding over the diamond of the crossing and approaching the station it was moving at 50 MPH or thereabouts.  The dust being created by the cars pounding over the diamond made it even more difficult in trying to see the markers and return to a position to effect the handing up of the Train Orders.

A time long gone.

 

View is from the NYC Southbound.  Notice that the diamonds are now 'jump frogs' for the former NYC - former B&O is all rail and thus doesn't experience the pounding that existed in 1966.

Never too old to have a happy childhood!

              

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Posted by Gramp on Sunday, December 26, 2021 7:33 PM

Too bad such a train ever has to stop between origin and destination.  So much energy needed to overcome inertia at rest. 

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Posted by zugmann on Sunday, December 26, 2021 7:48 PM

Gramp
Too bad such a train ever has to stop between origin and destination.  So much energy needed to overcome inertia at rest. 

 

It's a bunch of empty hoppers.  Not really that much trouble to get them moving.  

Just an odd thing to lament, IMO. 

  

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Posted by SD70Dude on Sunday, December 26, 2021 11:01 PM

Amazing what you can do without throttle restrictions.  The GEVO engine does produce a satisfying smooth chug, and doesn't rattle and clank as badly as an FDL.  

I've always liked this clip, a demonstration of both the superior adhesion of AC units and the abuse that traction motors must endure.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=bdLcipx37b8

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Posted by BaltACD on Sunday, December 26, 2021 11:47 PM

SD70Dude
Amazing what you can do without throttle restrictions.  The GEVO engine does produce a satisfying smooth chug, and doesn't rattle and clank as badly as an FDL.  

I've always liked this clip, a demonstration of both the superior adhesion of AC units and the abuse that traction motors must endure.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=bdLcipx37b8

Without comments I find it difficult to understand why the train came to a stop in the first place.  Train appeared to have good pace as the head end power passed the camera and it maintained good pace as the head end power went out of sight.  Then the rear end power comes into view and the train stops.  Was there engine failure on the head end?  Was there engine failure on the rear end power?  Once the train got restarted, after the low, low, low speed struggle and working of the wheel slip control it appeared to move away at a pretty good pace.

Never too old to have a happy childhood!

              

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Posted by traisessive1 on Monday, December 27, 2021 9:21 AM

Trains stop for many reasons. Why you find it difficult to understand that a train came to a stop is puzzling. 

10000 feet and no dynamics? Today is going to be a good day ... 

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Posted by Backshop on Monday, December 27, 2021 10:42 AM

traisessive1

Trains stop for many reasons. Why you find it difficult to understand that a train came to a stop is puzzling. 

 

Dispatchers normally try to not stop a train on a steep grade.  Balt was a dispatcher. He was just wondering why the train had to stop.

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Posted by BaltACD on Monday, December 27, 2021 10:59 AM

traisessive1
Trains stop for many reasons. Why you find it difficult to understand that a train came to a stop is puzzling. 

Trains stop for reasons!  I'd just like to know what the reason was that this train stopped on a grade as the video does not make the reason obvious.

Never too old to have a happy childhood!

              

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Posted by Euclid on Monday, December 27, 2021 11:23 AM

If the reason for stopping is not obvious, or stated by an employee at the scene, the only way to anwer the question is if someone involved with making the video called the railroad company and inquired.  Stopping without an explanation is puzzling.  Wondering why a train stopped for no apparent reason is not puzzling.  

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Posted by Overmod on Monday, December 27, 2021 11:26 AM

I believe that is on the Braganza Ghat line, with a ruling grade of about 2.7% and heavy iron-ore trains.  Getting stopped there with the train wrapped around those curves would be no fun.

As s note, there is a special arrangement restricting downhill operation to 30 km/h, below the fade point of the brakeshoes:

https://www.irfca.org/docs/aeb.html

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Posted by Euclid on Monday, December 27, 2021 12:14 PM
I kind of like these Russian freight trains.  They seem to have a very serious demeanor.  It would be interesting to tour through those locomotives.  I understand they use Fairbanks Morse O.P. engines or ones built to that pattern.
 
This video may be started at time 2:00 to get to the point.  It seems like the photographer may have made prior arrangements with the crew to stop on the grade and then restart to demonstrate coming back under load.  The video has good audio.  Turn it up.  
 
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Posted by BaltACD on Monday, December 27, 2021 1:02 PM

Euclid
I kind of like these Russian freight trains.  They seem to have a very serious demeanor.  It would be interesting to tour through those locomotives.  I understand they use Fairbanks Morse O.P. engines or ones built to that pattern. 
This video may be started at time 2:00 to get to the point.  It seems like the photographer may have made prior arrangements with the crew to stop on the grade and then restart to demonstrate coming back under load.  The video has good audio.  Turn it up.  
 

Honorary steam engines.

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Posted by York1 on Monday, December 27, 2021 1:34 PM

BaltACD
View is from the NYC Southbound.  Notice that the diamonds are now 'jump frogs' for the former NYC - former B&O is all rail and thus doesn't experience the pounding that existed in 1966.

 

My railroad knowledge is less than this one sentence.

How does a "jump frog" work?  I don't get the rail setup for crossing trains in this photo.

York1 John       

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Posted by BaltACD on Monday, December 27, 2021 1:45 PM

York1
 
BaltACD
View is from the NYC Southbound.  Notice that the diamonds are now 'jump frogs' for the former NYC - former B&O is all rail and thus doesn't experience the pounding that existed in 1966. 

My railroad knowledge is less than this one sentence.

How does a "jump frog" work?  I don't get the rail setup for crossing trains in this photo.

Frogs are designed for one side to have high speed 'all rail' through the crossing.  The low speed side 'jumps' the high speed rails.

http://industrialscenery.blogspot.com/2015/03/high-speedlow-speed-diamond.html

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Posted by Backshop on Monday, December 27, 2021 2:02 PM

I found it unusual that a few of the blue cars near the end of the train had their company name written in English "Trans Oil Group of Companies".

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Posted by tree68 on Monday, December 27, 2021 5:24 PM

BaltACD
View is from the NYC Southbound.  Notice that the diamonds are now 'jump frogs' for the former NYC - former B&O is all rail and thus doesn't experience the pounding that existed in 1966.

The diamonds at Deshler are now "flange bearing, both directions."  There is no pounding, and trains can move in either direction at speed (35 MPH, I believe).  While one can hear some pounding going on, it's not the diamonds.  Instead it's the circuit isolation joints on each side of the diamond.  All you can hear of cars going over the diamond itself is a soft whirr.

The diamonds at Durand, MI, are as Balt describes, with the double track CN Flint sub getting the smooth sailing.

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Posted by Electroliner 1935 on Monday, December 27, 2021 8:08 PM

As to the Russian engines.

 

No EPA.

Definatly not Tier 4 

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Posted by York1 on Tuesday, December 28, 2021 11:20 AM

BaltACD
Frogs are designed for one side to have high speed 'all rail' through the crossing.  The low speed side 'jumps' the high speed rails. http://industrialscenery.blogspot.com/2015/03/high-speedlow-speed-diamond.html

 

Thanks!  I've never heard of or seen that before.

York1 John       

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