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Ships Engine Room with EMD Engines.

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Ships Engine Room with EMD Engines.
Posted by CMStPnP on Wednesday, October 20, 2021 4:38 PM

They sure are kept clean!!!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y5EeBhGHar4

 

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Posted by BaltACD on Wednesday, October 20, 2021 4:49 PM

When I was a kid we took a vacation that included riding the Panama Limited from Chicago to New Orleans.  During our staty in New Orleans one afternnon we too a water tour of the port area along the Mississippi.  During the tour while we were in the middle of the river, it sounded like a B&O Timesaver was 'right there' - it was a tow boat powered by some number of good old EMD 567's chanting their way along the river in Run 8.

Never too old to have a happy childhood!

              

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Posted by tree68 on Wednesday, October 20, 2021 5:13 PM

CMStPnP
They sure are kept clean!!!

Not surprising in a business that includes a job titled "wiper..."

LarryWhistling
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Posted by CSSHEGEWISCH on Thursday, October 21, 2021 10:06 AM

Railroad-size diesel engines from all of the builders are common in marine usage.  I've heard EMD engines on the M/V "Incan Superior" as it passed under the Duluth Aerial Bridge.

The daily commute is part of everyday life but I get two rides a day out of it. Paul
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Posted by BEAUSABRE on Thursday, October 21, 2021 10:39 AM

CSSHEGEWISCH
Railroad-size diesel engines from all of the builders are common in marine usage

Don't forget that Alco, Baldwin & Lima bought maritime diesel builders (Mackintosh & Seymore, Delavergne and Hamilton) to provide them with a prime mover. FM adopted an engine originally built to power submarines. And Winton was a power in the maritime market before GM bought it. 

Consider this. The US built over 1000 LST hulls in WW2. Every single one had two 1000hp Model 567 engines. That's 2000 plus NW2's that never got built (or a thousand E6's). That's why EMD wasn't allowed to build switchers during the war. And while everyone knows about EMD and Detroit Diesel Division (Model 6-71 engines for LCM's and M4A2 tanks for the Marines and Russians), Cleveland Diesel Engine Division (the old Winton organization) supplied thousands of Model 278 and 268 engines to the Navy

"War production for CDED would ultimately amass 5,562 Navy ships – 141 Submarines, 376 Tugs, 399 Destroyers, 1140 Sub Chasers/Escorts, 1817 Landing Craft, 992 Minesweepers/Layers, 299 Cargo Ships, 89 Tenders, 48 Transports, 97 Patrol/Rescue/Salvage Vessels, 85 Carriers/Ammo Ships/Other and 79 Battleships, Cruisers and Gunships.  39.5% of these used CDED for propulsion and auxiliary, 23.75% for propulsion only and the remainder for auxiliary only.  21,709 engines were ultimately built strictly for WWII service"

Cleveland Diesel Engine Division – GM’s war hero turned ugly stepsister. – Vintage Diesel Design (wordpress.com)

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Posted by lenzfamily on Thursday, October 21, 2021 11:24 AM

tree68

 Depends on the Chief Engineer and the Seconds. Some are sticky about cleanliness, others, not so much. Not sure how many marine wipers there are left.

Charlie

 
CMStPnP
They sure are kept clean!!!

 

Not surprising in a business that includes a job titled "wiper..."

 

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Posted by NittanyLion on Thursday, October 21, 2021 1:25 PM

The Saturn Vs, Space Shuttles, and (eventually) SLSes all rolled out to the pad on the back of a pair of ALCO 251Cs.

So, two C628s or one C855.  Your pick.

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Posted by 7j43k on Thursday, October 21, 2021 2:46 PM

Speaking of engine rooms, when I was a kid we took a boat ride down to Mount Vernon from DC.  On that boat, you could look down into the engine room and watch the triple compound steam engine run.  BIG fun!

 

Ed

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Posted by mvlandsw on Thursday, October 21, 2021 3:21 PM

BaltACD

When I was a kid we took a vacation that included riding the Panama Limited from Chicago to New Orleans.  During our staty in New Orleans one afternnon we too a water tour of the port area along the Mississippi.  During the tour while we were in the middle of the river, it sounded like a B&O Timesaver was 'right there' - it was a tow boat powered by some number of good old EMD 567's chanting their way along the river in Run 8.

 

When I worked on Neville Island at the Dravo plant EMD engines were being installed on tow boats.

I still occasionally hear them as they leave the Emsworth locks on the Ohio River. It can be hard to tell whether I'm hearing a tow boat or a CSX train on the far bank of the river. Usually the tow boats take longer to move away though and they don't whistle for road crossings.

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Posted by tree68 on Thursday, October 21, 2021 4:11 PM

7j43k

Speaking of engine rooms, when I was a kid we took a boat ride down to Mount Vernon from DC.  On that boat, you could look down into the engine room and watch the triple compound steam engine run.  BIG fun! 

Ed

Did that on the BobLo boats on the Detroit River.  All that brass, and it really shined!

Spent a summer on what was probably the last Liberty Ship in the Navy inventory at the time. Didn't get down to the engine room often, but it, too had a triple expansion steam engine.  Eighty-eight turns was max, and if it was doing that, you knew it...

LarryWhistling
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Posted by Euclid on Friday, October 22, 2021 9:17 AM
There are a lot of good engine room videos, but for best drama and excitement, this is my favorite.  It walks through the crew quarters, and then gets serious when the engine room door opens.   It works best at high volume.
 
 
 
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Posted by CSSHEGEWISCH on Friday, October 22, 2021 10:08 AM

tree68

 

 

 
7j43k

Speaking of engine rooms, when I was a kid we took a boat ride down to Mount Vernon from DC.  On that boat, you could look down into the engine room and watch the triple compound steam engine run.  BIG fun! 

Ed

 

Did that on the BobLo boats on the Detroit River.  All that brass, and it really shined!

Spent a summer on what was probably the last Liberty Ship in the Navy inventory at the time. Didn't get down to the engine room often, but it, too had a triple expansion steam engine.  Eighty-eight turns was max, and if it was doing that, you knew it...

 

The VTE engines used in the Liberty Ships were a wartime necessity in consideration of the inexperienced ship's engineers that were being trained and hired at the time.

The daily commute is part of everyday life but I get two rides a day out of it. Paul
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Posted by tree68 on Friday, October 22, 2021 10:48 AM

CSSHEGEWISCH
The VTE engines used in the Liberty Ships were a wartime necessity in consideration of the inexperienced ship's engineers that were being trained and hired at the time.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HfnXk1nccQs

There is also a video of the engine room of the Jeremiah O'Brien on YT.  It's a little longer, and includes some train sound effects at the beginning and end...

I was on YAG40, the Granville S. Hall.

LarryWhistling
Resident Microferroequinologist (at least at my house) 
Everyone goes home; Safety begins with you
My Opinion. Standard Disclaimers Apply. No Expiration Date
Come ride the rails with me!
There's one thing about humility - the moment you think you've got it, you've lost it...

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Posted by 54light15 on Friday, October 22, 2021 10:49 AM

I had a short cruise on the Liberty John Brown about 15 years ago. I could go into the engine room but not to the lower level. I could watch that engine for hours! There's a huge triple-expansion engine here in Toronto in a city pumping station. It's no longer used but has been kept intact and can be run on compressed air and often is during the "open doors Toronto" event that they used to have. I was told that the makers of the movie Titanic filmed it while running and that's the engine that you see in the movie. 

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