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String Lining.

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Posted by Overmod on Tuesday, May 12, 2020 3:11 PM

Second Narrows was worse than the pictures indicate.  There was substantial structure to the 'left' of that left-leaning pier which pulled it over to where the visible span fell down.  You can imagine how much there would be to have that many steelworkers on it, working and with heavy tools, to cause all those prompt casualties.

There was at least one diver fatality during the recovery, too: more lives thrown at the failure.

NDG
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Posted by NDG on Tuesday, May 12, 2020 5:41 PM

 

FYI.
 
Replacing the Bridge @ Wasa, M. 14.6 Windermere Sub. Former Kootenay Division.
 
Bridge Replaced Built 1914. Kootenay Central. 600 Feet. 8 Spans.
 
 
 
 
Road Bridge about 2 miles downstream washed out in 1948.
 
CPR bridge planked and used as both Rail and Road bridge thru 1954.
 
Interlocked with Flagman and Swinging Gates. Four/Six trains a week. Light steel.
 
Line considered for abandonment, then refurbished early Sixties for Now Main Line to Coast via Colvalli/Golden.
 
Old Southern Routes later abandoned West from High Arrow Dam, Castlegar.
 
On Google.
 
 
1954-1979 Road Bridge approach to right.
 
 
 

Thank You.

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Posted by Paul_D_North_Jr on Tuesday, May 12, 2020 8:40 PM

Fascinating time-lapse videos of the Kootenay River bridge replacement - 'not their first rodeo!'

Thanks for sharing!

- PDN. 

"This Fascinating Railroad Business" (title of 1943 book by Robert Selph Henry of the AAR)
NDG
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Posted by NDG on Wednesday, May 13, 2020 1:13 AM

Oftentimes the past is better left there and viewed thru soft-tinted lenses

Thank You.

NDG
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Posted by NDG on Friday, May 15, 2020 6:53 AM

 

Changes.
 
Certainly has changed since the streetcars came off?
 
 
 
 
Same in Lachine.  Dominion Bridge Affluence.
 
 
Mais, C'est La Vie.
 

Merci.

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Posted by Paul of Covington on Friday, May 15, 2020 8:40 AM

NDG

 

 
 
 
 
Mais, C'est La Vie.
 

Merci.

 

   The convex/concave sides were common back in the early days.  Does anyone know why they would go to the trouble of building them that way?

_____________ 

  "A stranger's just a friend you ain't met yet." --- Dave Gardner

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Posted by Overmod on Friday, May 15, 2020 10:00 AM

Paul of Covington
The convex/concave sides were common back in the early days.  Does anyone know why they would go to the trouble of building them that way?

We've actually had discussions on this in the past.  The 'concavity' was to clear the hubs of adjacent wagon wheels, and in some cases other parts of the wheels themselves.  In the old days, closer to the era of beaked chariots, those were the parts that projected furthest into potential contact.

Some of the convexity of the sides was an attempt to provide more useful space for seated passengers, on the general model used in, for example, coffins.  Some of it has been attributed to the kind of structural strengthening for weight that was seen more dramatically in newer high-speed interurban car construction, or in things like Metroliner/Amfleet shells.  I have a suspicion that some of it might be to give a better or more 'streamlined' appearance.

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Posted by CSSHEGEWISCH on Friday, May 15, 2020 10:27 AM

CTA has had curved sides on its rapid transit equipment since the PCC's were introduced in the 1950's.  It allowed a wider carbody above platform level.  Also see the article in July 1965 TRAINS about Cincinnati Car Company's curved-side lightweight cars.

The daily commute is part of everyday life but I get two rides a day out of it. Paul
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Posted by Paul_D_North_Jr on Friday, May 15, 2020 8:34 PM
Cincinnati Car Company�s curved-side lightweight cars
from Trains July 1965  p. 28
"This Fascinating Railroad Business" (title of 1943 book by Robert Selph Henry of the AAR)
NDG
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Posted by NDG on Sunday, May 17, 2020 6:02 PM

 

O. T.
 
Interior View Can Car/Brill Diesel Autobus.
 
Montreal Transportation Comission.
 
Autobus 2841. Can Car/Brill
 
 
Emergency Exit to right of two boys on seat. Heater underneath.
 
Roster.
 
 
Engine on side.
 
 
Electric Transfer Dispenser. Fare Box from Streetcars. Change Tray added in Fifties.
 
 
Fare Box. From Streetcars. Being installed in new Autobus
 
 
 
Thank You.
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Posted by SD70Dude on Tuesday, May 19, 2020 12:01 AM

As a kid, I had a lot of fun dropping change into those fareboxes on our city buses.

Greetings from Alberta

-an Articulate Malcontent

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Posted by SD70Dude on Wednesday, May 20, 2020 9:38 PM

An attempt to give the hated desktop control stand more space:

https://railpictures.net/photo/14390/

Greetings from Alberta

-an Articulate Malcontent

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Posted by Paul_D_North_Jr on Thursday, May 21, 2020 9:06 PM

That's kind of funny, as long as no crew members were injured or killed.  Hard-luck unit, from the caption info.  Amazing that the desktop control stand survived in such good condition.  Should be lot more conveninet to look backwards during reverse moves now!

- PDN. 

"This Fascinating Railroad Business" (title of 1943 book by Robert Selph Henry of the AAR)
NDG
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Posted by NDG on Wednesday, May 27, 2020 5:25 PM
Arc Light.
 
In the old days illumination was achieved by the electric ' Arc ' between two
 electrodes in a suitable fixture.
 
The problem was that the electrodes were consumed during the process
 and had to be replaced.
 
 
 
Anyway.
 
 When used in street lighting mode, the lamps had to be lowered to
 street level so the Lamp Trimmer could trim or replace carbons as required.
 
A winch, rope and drum were used to do this.
 
In the following image, the Winch can be seen on pole next to pole with Car Stop sign to right.
 
 
Arc Lamp above Truck. 1945. US 2-8-2.
 
 
Interesting photographs.
 
 
Note Water Pump on CN 2545 2-8-0 at end of street.
 
 
The B T Co Cross Connect Terminal and Seat to left is interesting.
 
Connects Cable from CO Underground to Aerial Cable for distribution.
 
Thank You.
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Posted by tree68 on Wednesday, May 27, 2020 6:21 PM

Detroit (and some other cities) took arc lights to new highs - litterally.  Over 100 towers 175' high were spaced around downtown.  Each had several arc lights at the top.  Known as moonlights, they didn't last long, as incandescent lighting became more practical.

Detroit's Moonlights

Photo from the Shorpy collection.

Despite their height, the lamps had to be serviced daily.  The towers had a hoist mechanism to make it possible for men to go up the tower for said service.

LarryWhistling
Resident Microferroequinologist (at least at my house) 
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Posted by zugmann on Wednesday, May 27, 2020 6:43 PM

tree68
Detroit (and some other cities) took arc lights to new highs - litterally.  Over 100 towers 175' high were spaced around downtown

Dont' be fooled - those were 5G towers erected to spread viruses! 

   The opinions expressed here represent my own and not those of my employer or any other railroad, company, or person.

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Posted by BaltACD on Wednesday, May 27, 2020 8:24 PM

zugmann
 
tree68
Detroit (and some other cities) took arc lights to new highs - litterally.  Over 100 towers 175' high were spaced around downtown 

Dont' be fooled - those were 5G towers erected to spread viruses! 

Everything goes better with Chlorox.

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Posted by rdamon on Thursday, May 28, 2020 9:05 AM

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Posted by Overmod on Thursday, May 28, 2020 9:14 AM

rdamon

 

As charlie hebdo complained, stop spreading these conspiracy theories! If the 5G transmission is vaccine-based why are we having so much consternation over getting actual vaccine that works on this disease?

For amusement you would have to include the timeline of flubs and walkbacks that have characterized this disaster, some of which are even wackier than the meme.

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Thursday, May 28, 2020 11:27 AM

rdamon

 

Bad enough I have to worry about midget albino neo-Nazi cannibals living under the Fort Lee anchorages of the George Washington Bridge!

What, you haven't heard about them?  Thank your lucky stars you haven't!

And don't get me started about the Satanist cults in the woods of Sussex County NJ!  

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Posted by SD70Dude on Thursday, May 28, 2020 2:03 PM

What his picture doesn't show is the little Illuminati pyramid that is found at the base of every cell tower.  The tower and its antennas represent the all-seeing eye. 

Must be some treasure clues in them thar towers.  Where is Nick Cage when we need him!!!?

Greetings from Alberta

-an Articulate Malcontent

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Posted by SD70Dude on Thursday, May 28, 2020 2:15 PM

NDG
Arc Light.
 
In the old days illumination was achieved by the electric ' Arc ' between two
 electrodes in a suitable fixture.
 
The problem was that the electrodes were consumed during the process
 and had to be replaced.
 
 
 
Anyway.
 
 When used in street lighting mode, the lamps had to be lowered to
 street level so the Lamp Trimmer could trim or replace carbons as required.
 
A winch, rope and drum were used to do this.
 
In the following image, the Winch can be seen on pole next to pole with Car Stop sign to right.
 
 
Arc Lamp above Truck. 1945. US 2-8-2.
 
 
Interesting photographs.
 
 
Note Water Pump on CN 2545 2-8-0 at end of street.
 
 
The B T Co Cross Connect Terminal and Seat to left is interesting.
 
Connects Cable from CO Underground to Aerial Cable for distribution.
 
Thank You.

Carbon arc lamps would seem to be as maintenance-intensive as brushed DC traction motors.  No wonder they fell out of use. 

What sort of a pump is that on 2545?  I assume you mean the shrouded thing immediately ahead of the cross-compound air compressor.

PDN - That GE unit was trailing in a consist that hit a semi at a level crossing in B.C.  No one was in it during the crash.  It appears that some cars and containers ran through its cab as the slack ran in hard after the impact. 

Greetings from Alberta

-an Articulate Malcontent

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Thursday, May 28, 2020 3:18 PM

SD70Dude
Where is Nick Cage when we need him!!!?

I'll settle for Helen Mirren!

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Posted by Overmod on Thursday, May 28, 2020 4:55 PM

SD70Dude
What sort of a pump is that on 2545?  I assume you mean the shrouded thing immediately ahead of the cross-compound air compressor.

Looks like one of those all-in-one feed water-heater things (what was it, a Worthington BL or something like that) which were supposed to be easier to retrofit than the kind with parts all over the locomotive.  Sure is big looking on that engine!

 

NDG
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Posted by NDG on Thursday, May 28, 2020 6:17 PM

FYI.

Bell Telephone Map 1909.
 
 
Thank You.
 
As Mr. O. says its one of those Worthington derivatives.
 
Have seen another view of a CN 2-8-2 with one.
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Posted by Flintlock76 on Thursday, May 28, 2020 6:37 PM

Amazing how big the Bell System grew by 1909, isn't it?

And only 33 years after "Mr. Watson!  Come here!  I need you!"

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Posted by Overmod on Thursday, May 28, 2020 6:52 PM
NDG
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Posted by NDG on Friday, May 29, 2020 7:24 AM

FYI.

 
Looking for something else, find this.
 
CN 3532 Built 1923 w Worthington FWH. Belpaire Fire Box, Vanderbilt Tender from 2-8-0. On Passenger.
 
 
Some of this class of Mikado received New Vanderbilt Tenders off New CN Built 2-8-0s. 1931.
 
 
Had V. Tender when built 1931. Front End Throttle. 250 PSI. Swivel Headlight. Wooden Western Pilot.
 
 
And so on.
 

Thank You.

 

NDG
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Posted by NDG on Saturday, May 30, 2020 7:33 AM

 

Feedwater Heaters.
 
Thank You to Mr. O for Posting the following!
 
 
The Worthington BL FWH definitely a COMPLEX piece of Equipment!!
 
Wonder how IT removed Cylinder Lubricating Oil from Exhaust?
 
According to Lore, Locomotive Firemen HATED some of the more modern FWH Devices, as they would ' Break ' when the Engineer moved the Throttle and Water Flow to Boiler had to be watched carefully.
 

Lovely Reading.

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