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String Lining.

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Posted by Paul of Covington on Tuesday, February 25, 2020 11:01 PM

SD70Dude

   Every time I see massive wooden trestles, I find them simply amazing.

_____________ 

  "A stranger's just a friend you ain't met yet." --- Dave Gardner

NDG
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Posted by NDG on Tuesday, February 25, 2020 11:11 PM

Thank You for Posting the films!

Something for everyone!

Magnificent!!

In many ways.

Memories.

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Posted by Paul_D_North_Jr on Wednesday, February 26, 2020 5:24 AM

V-10 Pacific Great Eastern Railway (PGE) Track Inspection - 8:34 long.  Would be interested in knowing more about that V-10 inspection vehicle.  Looks too big to be a typical motorcar or "speeder", and one of those wouldn't be adequate protection for that cold in the depths of winter anyway (note light snow in some of the segments).  Also interesting clips of the ALCos smoking as they run-by.

Thanks for sharing!

- PDN.  

"This Fascinating Railroad Business" (title of 1943 book by Robert Selph Henry of the AAR)
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Posted by tree68 on Wednesday, February 26, 2020 7:27 AM

V-10 reminds me of a couple of the "speeders" I've seen when NARCOA has paid us a visit - more like small buses.  At least the cab is fully enclosed, and if there's a decent heater it doesn't look like it would be too bad in most weather.

It's certainly too big to just set off for a meet, as can be done with your typical Fairmount, etc.

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Posted by SD70Dude on Wednesday, February 26, 2020 8:37 AM

The V-10 is a Wickham Inspection Car, manufactured in England.  CN and CP also had a few, and several have been preserved.

http://www.railpictures.ca/?attachment_id=4869

https://www.railpictures.net/photo/489372/

http://www.wpgrailwaymuseum.com/page2.html

V-10 in its original paint:

http://www.railpictures.ca/?attachment_id=29848

It survived in service long enough to get painted in the final BC Rail livery (dark blue with white lettering), and today resides at the Central BC Railway & Forestry Museum in Prince George:

http://rrpicturearchives.net/locoPicture.aspx?id=75000

Greetings from Alberta

-an Articulate Malcontent

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Posted by Deggesty on Wednesday, February 26, 2020 10:44 AM

This may not be appropriate to this thread, but the mention of speeders reminded me of a short trip I once had. One day, when I lived by the main line of The Main Line of Mid-America, I walked out of the house, and saw the signal maintainer working at the crossover between the two mains, and walked over to talk with him. After he finished that task, he invited me to go with him to get a cup of coffee. It was not a long trip--200-300 feet to the station--but it was a ride on a speeder. I do not remmeber if he set his vehicle off the track at the station.

Johnny

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Posted by cx500 on Wednesday, February 26, 2020 11:20 AM

Two CPR Wickhams have been preserved, one at Champion Park in operating condition, just south of Calgary, and the other at Smiths Falls in Ontario.

CN's narrow gauge (3'-6") line in Newfoundland had one but that seems to have disappeared with the railway.  Don't know offhand if any standard gauge ones survived.

I also saw one in Peru on the 3'-0 gauge line to Macchu Picchu.

Apparently they could get uncomfortably hot on a summer day.

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Posted by NDG on Thursday, February 27, 2020 2:47 PM
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Posted by Flintlock76 on Thursday, February 27, 2020 4:11 PM

Bad enough he robbed a Timmys.

Even worse that he used a rubber chicken.

Even worse  he stole a donation box!

Is there no depths to the depravity of some people?  Crying  

Stop the world, I wanna get off!

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Posted by tree68 on Thursday, February 27, 2020 5:45 PM

Flintlock76
Even worse  he stole a donation box!

We used to have an old fare box at our station for donations.  One day someone walked in to the station, picked it up, and walked out with it.  I suspect the money that was in it was a bonus - most likely they wanted the fare box.

LarryWhistling
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Posted by SD70Dude on Thursday, February 27, 2020 6:37 PM

And now for something completely different.

Could this have been the first covered hopper ever built?  It predates "Big John" by several decades:

Image may contain: train and outdoor

Greetings from Alberta

-an Articulate Malcontent

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Posted by tree68 on Thursday, February 27, 2020 7:46 PM

I found a source with an article from Railway Age dated 1920.  It said nothing about this car being the first covered hopper, but did describe how it was designed to work with existing unloading facilities.

Scroll down about halfway down the page:  http://www.trainweb.org/oldtimetrains/photos/cpr_rolling/two.htm

If Carl sees this thread, he may be able to add some insight.

LarryWhistling
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Posted by Flintlock76 on Friday, February 28, 2020 9:37 PM

That was incredible NDG, thanks so much for posting it!

All that work, and done by hand, with hand drills, sledge hammers, picks, and black powder for blasting.  How can you NOT admire the people who put those tunnels through?

You know, as we look back on history and those who came before us, we should celebrate their achievements, recognize their mistakes, but never, EVER, feel superior to them.  Who are we?  

Who the hell are we?

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Posted by CSSHEGEWISCH on Saturday, February 29, 2020 6:47 AM

I was impressed by the St. Clair Tunnel for similar reasons:  hand removal of the blue clay, alignment of the tunnel shields without lasers, etc.

The daily commute is part of everyday life but I get two rides a day out of it. Paul
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Posted by Overmod on Monday, March 2, 2020 1:55 PM

CN enginehouse in Prince Rupert reported as destroyed by fire.  Intentionally set.

See usual news sources.

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Posted by Electroliner 1935 on Monday, March 2, 2020 3:48 PM
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Posted by SD70Dude on Monday, March 2, 2020 7:00 PM

Montreal, 1995, after the final demise of the caboose.  Most of these were less than 20 years old, and most had been homebuilt at CN's Point St. Charles shops, also in Montreal.

Image may contain: sky, outdoor and nature

Image may contain: sky, train and outdoor

Evokes that iconic Pacific Electric shot.

At least no one was hurt in the CN Prince Rupert shop fire.  A shame, that building should have become part of the museum across the tracks, beside the also disused former CN and VIA brick station.

Greetings from Alberta

-an Articulate Malcontent

NDG
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Posted by NDG on Tuesday, March 3, 2020 1:42 AM

 

F-M Cabeese.
 
Thank You for posting these images!!
 
I saw the first of these @ Calder c. 1980, the man I was with worked downtown in the Headquarters building w the Chrome Driving Wheel
from the CN 3800 in the Lobby.
 
Some of this class renumbered near their end for new MLW Diesels.
 
 
 
Way back we had visited Buffalo, NY. in the Central Days and NYC was shoving the Hump w three 3 Unit sets of the F-M Visored Switchers.
 
Similar to this, one still in Lightning Stripes.
 
 
FWIW. Overhead corridor next to Station severed to allow passage of TOFC Flats and Auto Racks, or so it was said.
 
Most Central drags were all/most 244 and a treat to view hammering along the shore of Lake Erie on the Water Level Route.
 
Love the Horns!!! at dusk.
 
The then new Central U25Bs already looked like scrap.
 
When we went back a few years later PRR 6800s ???? 6-Motor RSD5s ??? on the Hump.
 
Anyway.
 
One of us remarked the New CN Cabooses somewhat resembled the 8300s @ Buffalo.
 
 
At LAST!!
 
Someone else knows about the PE cars piled up.
 
Some Internet sources claim they are retired Montreal Tramways cars.
 
FWIW.
 
Back in Fifties there was a TV Show called ' Rescue 8 ' which featured a plot centered around piled streetcars.
 
 
Meanwhile ' our ' streetcars had a year to go.
 
Steam about 18 months.
 
 
 

Thank You.

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Posted by tree68 on Tuesday, March 3, 2020 7:18 AM

Interesting cabeese.  I can't say that I've ever seen that configuration before.

Rescue 8 didn't have the same effect on fire and EMS as its later cousin "Emergency" did.  And Randolph Mantooth (Johnny Gage) still tours the country speaking on EMS.  Trivia:  the name "John Gage" was used because the technical consultant (and acknowledged fire/EMS guru) Jim Page wouldn't let them use his name.

Humor and side-stories notwithstanding, everything you saw on "Emergency" was technically correct - done just as the LA County FD would have done it.  Jim saw to that.

The show also introduced the country to the "Jaws of Life."  Per Mr. Mantooth, Hurst couldn't figure out why a fire department would want the tool, which was designed for getting race drivers out of race cars.  They did see the value of publicity, however, and wanted one of the five sets LACo bought to go on the show.  The rest, as they say, is history.

LarryWhistling
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Posted by Flintlock76 on Tuesday, March 3, 2020 11:20 AM

"Emergency!"  Lady Firestorm and I just love that show, as a matter of fact with Lady F's father being a volunteer firefighter that show was mandatory viewing in her house the nights it was on.  Her dad loved that show!

The firehouse in the show's still there, and it's hardly changed at all in the past 40+ years.  Here's a brief video.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I4jNjuzmgOA  

Randy Mantooth tells a story that as the series was wrapping up for the final time he was approached by the chief of the LA County FD with an offer to join the department.  "I can make it happen," he said, "By this time you know as much as any of us do!"  Mantooth was flattered, but politely turned the chief down. 

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Posted by tree68 on Tuesday, March 3, 2020 11:39 AM

Station 127.  Menard's sells a model of it.  Not too long ago they had a "reunion" there with the squad (currently housed in the LA Co Fire Museum) and the Ward LaFrance engine (ditto).

As I recall, both Randy and Kevin actually went through the paramedic training, but were never certified.  

LarryWhistling
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Posted by Flintlock76 on Tuesday, March 3, 2020 1:02 PM

We had quite a chat on the "Classic Toy Trains" Forum about that Menards Station 127 model.

Now, Menards doesn't say  it's a model of 127, or Station 51 for matter,  but if you're a fan of the show there's no doubt in your mind what it is!  

The major difference?  The Menards model has Jack the German Shepherd on the ramp.  Station 51 should have Henry the Basset Hound! 

I quote Captain Stanley, "Either that dog's sick or he's the laziest dog in the world!"  

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Posted by tree68 on Tuesday, March 3, 2020 1:20 PM

Flintlock76
Now, Menards doesn't say  it's a model of 127, or Station 51 for matter,  but if you're a fan of the show there's no doubt in your mind what it is!  

I took the poor representation of a fire truck off it and replaced that with a couple of Matchbox 70th Anniversary Seagraves.  And I'm replacing the sign with a changeable version, since I do show off my diecasts from time to time.  

The model isn't deep enough to hold a truck, though...

LarryWhistling
Resident Microferroequinologist (at least at my house) 
Everyone goes home; Safety begins with you
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Come ride the rails with me!
There's one thing about humility - the moment you think you've got it, you've lost it...

NDG
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Posted by NDG on Tuesday, March 3, 2020 1:52 PM
NDG
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Posted by NDG on Tuesday, March 3, 2020 2:36 PM

 

OT.
 
Sidewalk Maple Leafs. A Touch of Class?
 
Back in the day, when City Sidewalks were poured, Bronze Maple Leafs were inset in the fresh concrete to attest to their year of construction.
 
Les Duranceaux, Alexandre et Charles, were two of the many firms engaged in this practice.
 
A story in itself.
 
Thru Urban Renewal, these become less and less common and often create great interest when now discovered.
 
Once the most common version. This image about 5/6 size. Bronze. Three spikes cast on underside to hold same in concrete as poured.
 
 
Ditto.
 
 
 
J. Accurso. About 2/3 size.
 
 
Several other Contractors used various shaped Sidewalk Plates.
 
Few photos and fewer plates now extant.
 
Most roads and sidewalks used Concrete much of it mixed and poured on site by Crawler Mixers, a lovely machine to watch when a kid.
 
And as an Adult, also, judging by the crowds.
 
Example.
 
 
The boom to left had rolling bucket w clam shell bottom doors which swung side to side to pour fresh mixed concrete into sidewalk forms
or as underlay for asphalt pavement.
 
Dry cement, gravel and sand arrived in segmented Batch Trucks which discharged their loads into Skip, at right, which was hoisted
to discharged into mixer drum.
 
Water from hose to Hydrant, or water tanker truck.
 
Large crawler mixers poured many of the early Turnpikes.
 
And so on.
 
 
 
More than Steam to keep a kid busy after the War.
 
We used to follow Contractors on our bikes and salvage the maple leafs on betterment projects, dug up by Pneumatic Drills
 

Thank You.

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Posted by SD70Dude on Wednesday, March 4, 2020 4:34 PM

Prototype Octagon?

http://www.railpictures.ca/?attachment_id=40492

Could this be the only piece of "modern" commuter equipment with plain bearings?

I drew in the wet cement as a kid, when Mom wasn't looking.

Greetings from Alberta

-an Articulate Malcontent

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Posted by Electroliner 1935 on Wednesday, March 4, 2020 4:42 PM

SD70Dude

Prototype Octagon?

http://www.railpictures.ca/?attachment_id=40492

Could this be the only piece of "modern" commuter equipment with plain bearings?

I drew in the wet cement as a kid, when Mom wasn't looking.

 

It's a little early for April fools day.

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Wednesday, March 4, 2020 5:40 PM

Electroliner 1935

 

 
SD70Dude

Prototype Octagon?

http://www.railpictures.ca/?attachment_id=40492

Could this be the only piece of "modern" commuter equipment with plain bearings?

I drew in the wet cement as a kid, when Mom wasn't looking.

 

 

 

It's a little early for April fools day.

 

A GO Transit express shipments car?  Who'd a thunk it?

On the other hand, with plain bearings?  Probably not.

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