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Epoxy Resin: Pour-On or Envirotex?

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Epoxy Resin: Pour-On or Envirotex?
Posted by kasskaboose on Thursday, February 4, 2021 1:23 PM

I've used Envirotex and like the realistic results. Since I need a few more applications, should I get more or and use Pour-On? 

The cost of Envortex is driving me away from more purchases. The cost is about 25$ four 16 oz. In contrast, Pour-On is about that much for twice the amount.  I've read on Amazon some bad reviews and that could occur for many reasons.  

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Posted by RR_Mel on Thursday, February 4, 2021 1:34 PM

I like Park’s Super Glaze, about $25 a qt. at a big box store.  It works as good or better than the hobby epoxies.

 

Mel



 
My Model Railroad   
http://melvineperry.blogspot.com/
 
Bakersfield, California
 
I'm beginning to realize that aging is not for wimps.

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Posted by MisterBeasley on Thursday, February 4, 2021 1:45 PM

I've always bought Envirotex at Michaels.  They always have a coupon available for 1/2 off on one item, so that's what I get.  It really cute the price down.

It takes an iron man to play with a toy iron horse. 

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Posted by SeeYou190 on Thursday, February 4, 2021 2:19 PM

I will always stick with envirotex because I know how to work with it and get acceptable results.

If you are going to try a new product, you should experiment with it first, and that just drives the price up.

The 50% off coupon at Michael's is a good strategy.

-Kevin

Wink Happily modeling my STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD. A Class A line located in a personal fantasy world of semi-plausible nonsense on Tuesday, August 3rd, 1954.

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Posted by kasskaboose on Friday, February 5, 2021 8:55 AM

Michael's does have 20% coupons, but I've not seen 50%.  Perhaps that was at an earlier time?  I might try the HD product b/c still need more waterbodies.

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Posted by MisterBeasley on Friday, February 5, 2021 11:22 AM

kasskaboose

Michael's does have 20% coupons, but I've not seen 50%.  Perhaps that was at an earlier time?  I might try the HD product b/c still need more waterbodies.

I haven't bought Envirotex for some time, or even gone to Michael's.  Keep looking.  Unfortunately, A.C. Moore is gone, so that competition is no longer there.  Keep looking.  They may be more sporadic than they used to be.

It takes an iron man to play with a toy iron horse. 

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Posted by richhotrain on Sunday, February 7, 2021 7:06 AM

kasskaboose

I've used Envirotex and like the realistic results. Since I need a few more applications, should I get more or and use Pour-On? 

The cost of Envortex is driving me away from more purchases. The cost is about 25$ four 16 oz. In contrast, Pour-On is about that much for twice the amount.  I've read on Amazon some bad reviews and that could occur for many reasons.   

Stick with Envirotex Lite. It is worth the extra cost. Buy it on Amazon for less.

Rich

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Posted by hbgatsf on Sunday, February 7, 2021 7:29 AM

Can someone tell me how to calculate how much Envirotex is needed for a given area?

Rick

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Posted by richhotrain on Sunday, February 7, 2021 9:09 AM

hbgatsf

Can someone tell me how to calculate how much Envirotex is needed for a given area? 

The Envirotex Plus instructions indicate the following coverage, using a 1/8" deep pour:

4 oz. = 1 sq. ft.

16 oz. = 4 sq. ft.

32 oz. = 8 sq. ft.

64 oz. = 16 sq. ft.

128 oz. = 32 sq.ft.

When I poured my river, it covered a 12' x 30" space, plus an 18" x12" space for a total of 4,536 sq. in. or 31.5 sq. ft.

So, that space would require a 1/8" pour of just under 1 gallon (128 oz.). That was too close for comfort, so I bought a 1 gallon mix plus a 1 quart mix because I couldn't be sure that the pour would not be greater than 1/8". It was good that I did because I used the entire 5 quarts.

Of course, this was a major pour. In most applications, I am assuming that a lot less Envirotex Plus would be required, so I will leave it to you to do the math. 

Rich

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Posted by hbgatsf on Sunday, February 7, 2021 9:25 AM

Thank you.  Are there issues with needing two pours if it doesn't come out thick enough, or does it really need to be done in one?

Also, I bought some about 20 years ago and it has been sitting in a box unopened.  Does it have a shelf life?

Rick

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Posted by richhotrain on Sunday, February 7, 2021 9:35 AM

hbgatsf

Thank you.  Are there issues with needing two pours if it doesn't come out thick enough, or does it really need to be done in one?

In my case, it wasn't a question of thick enough or deep enough. I had every intention of following the instructions which cautioned against pouring the mix more than 1/8" deep. My concern was running out of mix before I completed the pour. If I ran out of mix, I could always buy more and complete the pour but would it match up or could a viewer see an overlap? So, my advice is to calculate the amount required and if it is close to the capacity of the next size bottle, buy more than you need because you just may need it, as I did.

Rich

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Posted by richhotrain on Sunday, February 7, 2021 9:39 AM

hbgatsf

Also, I bought some about 20 years ago and it has been sitting in a box unopened.  Does it have a shelf life? 

According to the Envirotex Plus instruction sheet, the compounds have a shelf life of 1 year. I wouldn't chance it with an unopened bottle that has sat on a shelf for 20 years.

Rich

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Posted by richhotrain on Sunday, February 7, 2021 9:48 AM

Sorry for a 3rd post, but I got to thinking about the pour that I did which was bit stressful over a 12 foot long area, 30 inches wide. I mixed a quart at a time and added some acrylic latex paint to tint the mix. 

For smaller spaces, after you pour the mix, you can spread it with a popsicle stick or some suitable alternative. Because my pour was over a 30 inch wide area, I used a paint stick.

Whatever type of stick that you use, you hold stick horizontally above the surface of the poured mix and then spread out the mix much like one would do when applying self leveling compound on a concrete floor.

In fact, Envirotex Plus is a self leveling compound. It is thick enough that it will not run all over the place so it is easy to control it as you apply it.

Rich

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Posted by hbgatsf on Wednesday, May 5, 2021 2:44 PM

richhotrain

 

 
hbgatsf

Also, I bought some about 20 years ago and it has been sitting in a box unopened.  Does it have a shelf life? 

 

 

According to the Envirotex Plus instruction sheet, the compounds have a shelf life of 1 year. I wouldn't chance it with an unopened bottle that has sat on a shelf for 20 years.

 

Rich

 

I was looking for something and came across my old package of Envirotex Lite.  Turns out I bought it in 1996.

I looked at it and didn't see any indication that it had hardened so I contacted them.  Here is the response:

For best results, EnviroTex Lite® should be used soon after purchase. 'Product in open containers should be used as soon as possible. Humidity and oxygen exposure while open can cause color degradation and crystallization with the remaining product. The shelf life of this product is approximately 1 year for an unopened container.

 

Expired product may still be usable;

The hardener will yellow over time, the yellowing is most noticeable over white or lighter colored backgrounds.

The resin will crystallize over time, Place the closed resin bottle into a warm bucket of tap water (not exceeding 80*F) for around 20 minutes. This method should dissolve any crystals present in the resin. If warmed resin is used right away you will lose about 10 minutes of your working time, to prevent this let the resin cool to room temperature before using.

With older product we recommend trying a sample first before committing to a larger project.

Never having worked with it before I wanted to do a small test anyway.  My hardener had yellowed, but since I was going to use it for nasty water that didn't bother me.  The resin didn't appear to have crystals but I heated it up anyway and then let it cool.  I painted some cardboard the same as my ditch and formed it into a 3" x 4" container.  When I mixed the product there was a slight yellow tint but after the pour it wasn't noticible.  The test hardened just fine.

I moved on and mixed a batch for the ditch.  Everything worked out fine.  If anything I probably should have tinted it more but this is in a spot that is not front and center so I am not going to worry about it.

I don't have enough of it for when I am ready for my bigger project so I will buy more when I am ready.  I do have another smaller project and have no reservations about using my old stuff.

Rick

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Posted by richhotrain on Wednesday, May 5, 2021 3:43 PM

hbgatsf
 
richhotrain 
hbgatsf

Also, I bought some about 20 years ago and it has been sitting in a box unopened.  Does it have a shelf life?  

According to the Envirotex Plus instruction sheet, the compounds have a shelf life of 1 year. I wouldn't chance it with an unopened bottle that has sat on a shelf for 20 years. 

Rich 

I was looking for something and came across my old package of Envirotex Lite.  Turns out I bought it in 1996.

I looked at it and didn't see any indication that it had hardened so I contacted them.  Here is the response:

For best results, EnviroTex Lite® should be used soon after purchase. 'Product in open containers should be used as soon as possible. Humidity and oxygen exposure while open can cause color degradation and crystallization with the remaining product. The shelf life of this product is approximately 1 year for an unopened container. 

Expired product may still be usable;

The hardener will yellow over time, the yellowing is most noticeable over white or lighter colored backgrounds.

The resin will crystallize over time, Place the closed resin bottle into a warm bucket of tap water (not exceeding 80*F) for around 20 minutes. This method should dissolve any crystals present in the resin. If warmed resin is used right away you will lose about 10 minutes of your working time, to prevent this let the resin cool to room temperature before using.

With older product we recommend trying a sample first before committing to a larger project.

Never having worked with it before I wanted to do a small test anyway.  My hardener had yellowed, but since I was going to use it for nasty water that didn't bother me.  The resin didn't appear to have crystals but I heated it up anyway and then let it cool.  I painted some cardboard the same as my ditch and formed it into a 3" x 4" container.  When I mixed the product there was a slight yellow tint but after the pour it wasn't noticible.  The test hardened just fine.

I moved on and mixed a batch for the ditch.  Everything worked out fine.  If anything I probably should have tinted it more but this is in a spot that is not front and center so I am not going to worry about it.

I don't have enough of it for when I am ready for my bigger project so I will buy more when I am ready.  I do have another smaller project and have no reservations about using my old stuff.

Rick 

Excellent. That is good to know. Thanks for the update.

Rich

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Posted by hbgatsf on Thursday, May 6, 2021 5:51 AM

My next challenge will be sealing the containers so that it is still usable when I am ready to do another pour.  That may not be for another year.  I guess at that point I'll try another test batch to make sure it hasn't gone bad.

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Posted by kasskaboose on Thursday, May 6, 2021 7:23 AM

Rick: Thanks for providing the update and validating what others state in working with Envirotex: put a little on at a time.  Being impatient, that approach is a difficult one to swallow, but it makes sense to avoid a gloppy mess.

I too had really old Envirotex and it worked just fine.  Of course, I wouldn't recommend you follow that approach constantly!

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Posted by SeeYou190 on Thursday, May 6, 2021 11:21 AM

SeeYou190
I will always stick with envirotex because I know how to work with it and get acceptable results.

Since I posted this, I accidentally ordered this product from Amazon, so I will be giving it a try. Hopefully it is OK.

-Kevin

Wink Happily modeling my STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD. A Class A line located in a personal fantasy world of semi-plausible nonsense on Tuesday, August 3rd, 1954.

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Posted by MisterBeasley on Thursday, May 6, 2021 3:06 PM

I've never had Envirotex go bad, even after a few years.  I do practice good epoxy hygiene, wiping the inside and outside of the screw top thread to keep them clean after use.

I've only had trouble once, and that was my own fault.  I didn't mix it well enough, and after a week it remained sticky and unset.  I mixed another thin layer and poured it on.  That set fine, had no noticable boundary line and fixed the problem.

It takes an iron man to play with a toy iron horse. 

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Posted by wp8thsub on Thursday, May 6, 2021 6:46 PM

There is nothing magical about the Envirotex brand.  Every brand of epoxy resin is basically the same to work with, and should yield the same results.  I've used many different brands, including Pour-On, and encountered no issues working with any of them.

Rob Spangler

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Posted by hgodling on Saturday, May 8, 2021 5:30 PM

wp8thsub

There is nothing magical about the Envirotex brand.  Every brand of epoxy resin is basically the same to work with, and should yield the same results.  I've used many different brands, including Pour-On, and encountered no issues working with any of them.

 

 

The resin itself is pretty much the same. However the hardener can change a lot. The most ovious is the hardening time, but there can be other more subtle differences. 

( I'm not real familiar with pouring epoxy. My background is more with fiberglass and carbon fiber, but there is a lot of similarity.)

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