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Ogden & Cache Valley RR - Layout Construction

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  • Member since
    January 2017
  • From: Southern Florida Gulf Coast
  • 14,547 posts
Posted by SeeYou190 on Saturday, May 8, 2021 10:12 AM

Onewolf
Here's a draft version of the floorplan and basement of the house I plan to build 'up north'.

That looks like a beautiful place to be.

I had a good friend at work that retired to Tennessee from Florida about 10 years ago, and he is completely happy. The only thing he complains about is the sales tax rates.

Onewolf
The floorplan was in no way meant to imply it's close to a final version. I would say it's a proof of concept that all my givens/druthers fit in the space. It's amazing how much space it takes when all interior doors/doorways are at least 36".

36" doorways sound HUGE!

I don't know much about house planning, but the pantry door swinging into the kitchen looks like a bad idea to me. Is a pocket door possible/practical?

-Kevin

Wink Happily modeling my STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD. A Class A line located in a personal fantasy world of semi-plausible nonsense on Tuesday, August 3rd, 1954.

  • Member since
    January 2009
  • From: Maryland
  • 11,261 posts
Posted by ATLANTIC CENTRAL on Saturday, May 8, 2021 12:21 PM

SeeYou190

 

 
Onewolf
Here's a draft version of the floorplan and basement of the house I plan to build 'up north'.

 

That looks like a beautiful place to be.

I had a good friend at work that retired to Tennessee from Florida about 10 years ago, and he is completely happy. The only thing he complains about is the sales tax rates.

 

 
Onewolf
The floorplan was in no way meant to imply it's close to a final version. I would say it's a proof of concept that all my givens/druthers fit in the space. It's amazing how much space it takes when all interior doors/doorways are at least 36".

 

36" doorways sound HUGE!

I don't know much about house planning, but the pantry door swinging into the kitchen looks like a bad idea to me. Is a pocket door possible/practical?

-Kevin

 

Yes, I have already suggested a pocket door on the pantry in my PM.

Kevin, I would hope the entry doors to your house are 36".

For interior doors it is larger than usual, but much more wheel chair friendly if one is planning for that.

32" is the more typical interior door width for most rooms. Closets, bathrooms and other special situations can require other sizes.

Sheldon

    

  • Member since
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  • From: Southern Florida Gulf Coast
  • 14,547 posts
Posted by SeeYou190 on Sunday, May 9, 2021 12:27 AM

ATLANTIC CENTRAL
Kevin, I would hope the entry doors to your house are 36".

The front door is 36 inches.

Interior doors to rooms are 30 inches. Closet doors are 28 inches. The pocket door to the 1/2 bathroom is a skinny 24 inches.

-Kevin

Wink Happily modeling my STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD. A Class A line located in a personal fantasy world of semi-plausible nonsense on Tuesday, August 3rd, 1954.

  • Member since
    December 2008
  • From: Heart of Georgia
  • 4,644 posts
Posted by Doughless on Monday, May 10, 2021 9:06 AM

I tend to get into trouble talking about building codes, but its my understanding the each exterior opening must be at least 36 inches.  Front door, back door, and door to the garage.  Every modern house should have three 36 inch doors.  "Major" remodels require updating to that standard also.

- Douglas

  • Member since
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  • From: west coast
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Posted by rrebell on Monday, May 10, 2021 10:13 AM

Codes can vary by town, 36" is min. to be wheel chair accesable in general because the clear width is 32". 32" door plus hinge sticking out 1 1/2"  plus door knob sticking out 2 1/2".

  • Member since
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  • From: Heart of Georgia
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Posted by Doughless on Monday, May 10, 2021 10:25 AM

Even without codes, the builder needs to be able to fit furnaces, prefab shower units, etc into the house, and homeowners washers and dryers, so the opening has to be big enough.  Usually at least the front door and the garage.

Here in GA, we looked at some houses built as late a 2004 that had 28 inch back doors out to the deck.  I thought that was odd.

- Douglas

  • Member since
    January 2009
  • From: Maryland
  • 11,261 posts
Posted by ATLANTIC CENTRAL on Monday, May 10, 2021 11:34 AM

Doughless

I tend to get into trouble talking about building codes, but its my understanding the each exterior opening must be at least 36 inches.  Front door, back door, and door to the garage.  Every modern house should have three 36 inch doors.  "Major" remodels require updating to that standard also.

 

The IRC (international residential code used as the starting point for most jurisdictions) does not require ALL exterior doors to be 36", but it is good practice to make all exterior doors that hinge 36".

A 6' wide patio slider does not open to 36", and 5' sliders are legal as well and they only open about 27" in most cases.

Requirements for renovations are all over the map, all generalizations are false.

We restore/renovate houses all the time, with permits when needed, and keep original doors less than 36", porch railings only 27" high, stairs and stair winders that are not code today.

There are a million and one exceptions.

Sheldon

    

  • Member since
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  • From: Maryland
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Posted by ATLANTIC CENTRAL on Monday, May 10, 2021 11:39 AM

Doughless

Even without codes, the builder needs to be able to fit furnaces, prefab shower units, etc into the house, and homeowners washers and dryers, so the opening has to be big enough.  Usually at least the front door and the garage.

Here in GA, we looked at some houses built as late a 2004 that had 28 inch back doors out to the deck.  I thought that was odd.

 

Washers and dryers are only 27" wide, they go thru 30" doors fine. Refrigerators are mostly all made to fit thru 30" or 32" doors with the doors removed.

Prefab showers are pretty much a thing of the past, today cheap or expensive, tile or solid surface panels.

Furnaces, air handlers and boilers are smaller than ever, they too go thru 30" doors pretty much.

Sheldon

    

  • Member since
    January 2009
  • From: Maryland
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Posted by ATLANTIC CENTRAL on Monday, May 10, 2021 11:40 AM

Standard wheelchairs will go thru 30" doors, but it is not fun.

Bigger is better.

Sheldon

    

  • Member since
    January 2017
  • From: Southern Florida Gulf Coast
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Posted by SeeYou190 on Monday, May 10, 2021 8:40 PM

ATLANTIC CENTRAL
A 6' wide patio slider does not open to 36", and 5' sliders are legal as well and they only open about 27" in most cases.

I had to get a code variance on the permit for my new sliding rear door.

The original door was a two panel pocket door that had a 60" open width. The new door only has one sliding panel and only opens to a only little more than 24 inch width.

There is a travel stop that prevents the door from being opened far enough to damage the blind controls for the rigid door panel

It was easy for the contractor to get the variance from the city. The new door is rated for category 5 storms, and that improvement will get almost anything approved.

-Kevin

Wink Happily modeling my STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD. A Class A line located in a personal fantasy world of semi-plausible nonsense on Tuesday, August 3rd, 1954.

  • Member since
    January 2009
  • From: Maryland
  • 11,261 posts
Posted by ATLANTIC CENTRAL on Monday, May 10, 2021 11:26 PM

Here, as long as there is a 36" door into the house, as a secondary exterior door, your slider would not needed any special approval. In fact, unless it was part of a larger project, it would most likely be done without a permit and the inspection authority would be happy you did not bother them for that.

Our 1901 Queen Anne had five exterior doors when we bought it. Two were 36", the other three only 28".

Two of the smaller doors allow you to go from the dining room or the family room out onto the side sections of the wrap around porch.

The other small door was at the bottom of the rear staircase in the kitichen and took you onto a small service porch. We eliminated the door and that little porch.

Then we added a 6' slider in a different area of the kitchen/breakfast area out onto a deck which had a canvas awning system for summer.

So we still had five doors, and a basement bulkhead door.

Sheldon

 

    

  • Member since
    June 2014
  • From: East Central Florida
  • 480 posts
Posted by Onewolf on Tuesday, May 11, 2021 4:22 PM

The 36" interior door requirement is based on my desire to provide access for someone in a walker or wheelchair.  It could be either of my parents (early 80s) or me as I age. My goal is for this house to be my last/final house before the big dirt nap.  So to me, it makes sense to design it to be as accessible as possible.  36" doors is an easy way to help this.

 

Now, back to our regularly scheduled subject.  Trains.  I got most of the classification yard track pulled up last week, but I'm up in Tennessee this week meeting with builders so no progress on layout deconstruction.

Modeling an HO gauge freelance version of the Union Pacific Oregon Short Line and the Utah Railway around 1957 in a world where Pirates from the Great Salt Lake founded Ogden, UT.

- Photo album of layout construction -

  • Member since
    February 2001
  • From: Wyoming, where men are men, and sheep are nervous!
  • 2,958 posts
Posted by Pruitt on Tuesday, May 11, 2021 9:16 PM

Onewolf
My goal is for this house to be my last/final house before the big dirt nap.

Yeah, when I bought my house in Wenonah NJ, I planned to be hauled out out of it feet first at some point in the future.

I've lived in six different houses (owned four of them) since then. Big Smile You never know what life will throw at you next.

  • Member since
    January 2017
  • From: Southern Florida Gulf Coast
  • 14,547 posts
Posted by SeeYou190 on Tuesday, May 11, 2021 10:29 PM

Onewolf
My goal is for this house to be my last/final house before the big dirt nap.  So to me, it makes sense to design it to be as accessible as possible.  36" doors is an easy way to help this.

Mine too, but I can't put 36 inch doors on the inside. This is a very good idea.

I will need to struggle my wheelchair through 30 inch doorways.

-Kevin

Wink Happily modeling my STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD. A Class A line located in a personal fantasy world of semi-plausible nonsense on Tuesday, August 3rd, 1954.

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