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Adhesive for Figures

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  • Member since
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Adhesive for Figures
Posted by LIRRs on Monday, February 24, 2014 3:00 PM

Hi.

I am looking for recommendations regarding adhesives for HO figures that do not bond permanently (able to remove the figure without damage)  but would hold the subject in place.  I am not sure where I read an article or posting regarding this.  Any suggestions are always welcome.

All the best.

Reinhard 

All the best.

Joe F

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Posted by BATMAN on Monday, February 24, 2014 3:08 PM

I use caulk, just a teeny tiny dab. The figure easily pulls off.

Brent

It's not the age honey, it's the mileage.

https://www.youtube.com/user/BATTRAIN1/videos 


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Posted by cowman on Monday, February 24, 2014 3:08 PM

Woodland Scenics makes a product called Scenic Accents that is made just for that purpose.  I think I have read that some folks have been successful using tacky glue.  There may be other products that will work too.  Hopefully someone that has used a product will chime in.

Good luck,

Richard

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Posted by zstripe on Monday, February 24, 2014 3:12 PM

Reinhard,

Some people use Aileens tacky glue. I use Woodland Scenics, Hob-e-Tac. Put a tiny bit on the feet and they will stay, but can be removed if need be. I have a figure of a Brakeman on a SW7's front steps, with that product and he hasn't fallen off yet, in five yrs. My experience only. Dry's clear, stays tacky.

Frank

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Posted by ALEX WARSHAL on Monday, February 24, 2014 3:52 PM

Woodland Scenics Accents Glue or Aleene's Tacky Glue would be good; I use the accents glue for figures and the tacky glue for other projects.

My Layout Photos- http://s1293.photobucket.com/user/ajwarshal/library/

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Posted by RogerThat on Monday, February 24, 2014 4:05 PM

What's the diffference between Hob-e-Tac and Scenic Accents? I already have Hob-e-Tac. Is the other better for figures?

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Posted by zstripe on Monday, February 24, 2014 4:25 PM

RogerThat,

I think they changed the name from Hob-e-Tac, to Scenic Accents. In any event, I still have 3/4's of Hob-e-Tac, left and it still works great after 10 yrs.

Frank

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Posted by doctorwayne on Monday, February 24, 2014 4:53 PM

I use the Accent Glue, too.  Apply it to the feet (or bum if it's a seated figure) using the brush-in-cap, let it sit for a few minutes until it turns clear, then place the figure where you want it.  The material stays tacky for a long time, allowing figures to be re-positioned elsewhere.

These folks have been standing around at this station for ages.  Some had been hanging around at other stations, too, but mysteriously ended up here.  I know that they didn't get here by train, though, as none of them ever buy a ticket....must be railfans.


Same with this guy.  He tried for years to unlock his car, to no avail.  Someone moved him to another spot (and a different car), but I don't think that he's even noticed:


I recently started hiring locomotive crews and was hampered by the lack of suitable HO scale figures. 


However, I'm modelling the late '30s, and while hard times are mostly past, there are quite a few folks out there who would give an arm and a leg for a decent job (not to mention a free train ride):


 

As an added bonus, I'm well on my way to creating a gondola load for my yet-to-be-built rendering plant:


The Accent Glue is especially useful for placing figures in locomotive cabs, where access is often limited and usually only with tweezers.  It allows an improperly positioned figure to be moved, several times if necessary, until you're satisfied with the placement.  Here are a few views of men at work:








 

Wayne

 

 

 

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Posted by bogp40 on Monday, February 24, 2014 5:20 PM

If you like to constantly rearrange your "lil people, you can glue them to small  pieces of styrene. That little bit of "shine" at thier feet is not that noticable.

Modeling B&O- Chessie  Bob K.  www.ssmrc.org

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Posted by Curt Webb on Monday, February 24, 2014 6:57 PM

I use clear bathroom caulk in a squeze tube.

Curt Webb

The Late Great Pennsylvania Railroad

http://s1082.photobucket.com/albums/j372/curtwbb/

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Posted by LIRRs on Monday, February 24, 2014 7:30 PM

Hi to All.

Thank you for all the excellent suggestions.  The greatest source of knowledge is the experience of the forum members.

All the best.

Reinhard 

 

All the best.

Joe F

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Posted by bruce22 on Monday, February 24, 2014 9:09 PM
I must be doing something wrong with scenic accents cause after a few months some of my figures end up in a prone position !!!
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Posted by hon30critter on Monday, February 24, 2014 9:50 PM

Wayne!

Your "rendering plant" reference is just plain sick!Smile, Wink & GrinLaughLaugh

I have heard of people modelling a shoe store with the left over bits.

Dave

I'm just a dude with a bad back having a lot of fun with model trains, and finally building a layout!

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Posted by chutton01 on Monday, February 24, 2014 10:46 PM

hon30critter
I have heard of people modelling a shoe store with the left over bits.

That was my original plan for the amputated feet I obtained trimming figures to fit in vehicles and such, but in the unpainted Preseir figures set I used the shoes were often poorly molded and so the usable shoe yield rate is pitifully low - so instead, I am painting a few sets white, drilling out the "ankle" stumps some, and gluing some line between each pair to model "Sneaker Tossing" over power lines.

BTW, Doctor Wayne, I'd recognize that Bachmann Plasticville Engineer of yours anywhere (3rd picture down, left-most unpainted figure), but the two figures I had (have) I don't remember all that much flash (albiet, the set was from the late 1970s, and the two engineers served as Gas Station attendants on my first layout). I still have them, although since I model the modern era they serve as volunteers on the Philaphilia & Western tourist train that the Philadelphia Delaware Terminal allows to run on it's tracks (I think all figures in that Plasticville set, including the Bald Business guy with cigar, are somewhat larger than HO, even after you grind off that ugly beige plastic dome under their feet - and so you do need the Scenic Accents to keep them standing up)

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Posted by doctorwayne on Monday, February 24, 2014 11:59 PM

chutton01
....I'd recognize that Bachmann Plasticville Engineer of yours anywhere (3rd picture down, left-most unpainted figure).....


Thanks for identifying him.  I got several in a bag of unpainted figures off the "used" table at the LHS.  When you bring together figures from various manufacturers, it's surprising to see the disparity in their heights (and girths, too - some of the Atlas figures are positively emaciated).  I like the LaBelle engine crews and the figures which came with Revell HO scale structures still look pretty decent, both in size and the variety of poses.  One notable exception amongst the latter is this guy:


He came with either the moving van or the automobile transporter, and although he's well-proportioned, they made him undersize so that the fully-modelled figure would fit in the Ford c.o.e.   Mine was on the same sprue as the grill and bumpers, and was chrome-plated, head-to-toes.
He does fit well into this Jordan Model T, though, and I believe his legs are still intact. Smile, Wink & Grin



For many of my vehicles, I built them with the bodies removeable from the chassis.  That way, the figures can be in a vehicle supposedly in motion, but removed when the same vehicle is in a parking lot.  I don't normally shuffle the figures in that manner, but it's handy if I do an illustrated "story" thread on another forum.





Sylvan provides drivers for their vehicles...


...but I'd guess that the owner, Clare Gilbert, has a model of a rendering plant, too, as none of his drivers come with legs Laugh:


Wayne

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Posted by MisterBeasley on Tuesday, February 25, 2014 6:29 AM

I'm a big fan of Aileen's Tacky Glue.  It is relatively thick, and sets up within an hour or so.  It goes on white but dries clear.  It seems to hold figures in place indefinitely, yet they come off easily without damaging either the figures or the surface they're attached to.

It's available at craft stores like Michaels and A.C. Moore, and it's much cheaper than "model railroad" products.  As long as you practice good "glue hygiene," keeping the tip clean and replacing the cap, it has a shelf life measured in years.

When adding tall "field grass" to my scenery, this is also my adhesive of choice.  I like to add interiors to my structures, too, and I find Aileen's to be perfect for attaching the inkjet-printed interior images to the plastic walls.  It does not "bleed through" the paper and ruin the ink.

It takes an iron man to play with a toy iron horse. 

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Posted by chutton01 on Tuesday, February 25, 2014 8:24 AM

doctorwayne
 
chutton01
....I'd recognize that Bachmann Plasticville Engineer of yours anywhere (3rd picture down, left-most unpainted figure).....

If you were modeling in the 1980s, then that guy was everywhere. Checking my inventory, turns out I lied, as I have only one of the engineer figures left (with a fannel shirt represented by rust colored paint), but two of the brakemen figures (with their lanterns removed). All three of these big guys got painted-on full "grizzly adams" beards - in my mind I think it hides the fact these figures are overscale because they are big, beared, barrel chested men.
The Atlas figures, if you mean the "Pedestrian Figures set" (really a racing set, as it includes guys with starting flags, and a 1960s Doctor and Nurse), I agree some of those figures are really slender and over-tall - one made a good imposing cop figure though.

But this Sylvan driver stuff:

as none of his drivers come with legs :

  



I never owned a Sylvan kit (not my era), but driver & passenger figures should always have at least a lap and upper thighs (even if thin representations of legs made of bits of painted styrene) just like the figures in your other vehicles, because if you are viewing the layout from the normal elevated angle looking down into the vehicles, it just looks wrong - I made the same mistake before and it's more silly than creepy.

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Posted by HO-Velo on Tuesday, February 25, 2014 11:01 AM

I've had success using a tiny gob of Duct Seal, the stuff is very sticky and stays that way, is removable, but can leave a stain.  Heard of morticians wax, but haven't tried it.

A past MRR tip makes for easy removal and repositioning of figures and other objects.  Carefully drill a #75 hole up into the figures leg and insert a cut off models makers pin with a hint of CA glue, then drill an accompanying hole in the scenery, sidewalk, etc. for placement.  The figure can be mounted without a hole if the surface is soft enough, but in most cases the tiny holes aren't noticeable. Certainly a tedious operation drilling the tiny holes and I've maimed a few legs, but the pin makes for a handy holding spot for painting.

In the attached photo all the standing figures, cyclists and motorcycles were pinned, but the cork roadway made mounting easy without holes.

BTW, Docwayne always enjoy seeing your work and how-to's, thanks.

regards,  Peter

   

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Posted by joe323 on Wednesday, February 26, 2014 7:32 AM

MisterBeasley

I'm a big fan of Aileen's Tacky Glue.  It is relatively thick, and sets up within an hour or so.  It goes on white but dries clear.  It seems to hold figures in place indefinitely, yet they come off easily without damaging either the figures or the surface they're attached to.

It's available at craft stores like Michaels and A.C. Moore, and it's much cheaper than "model railroad" products.  As long as you practice good "glue hygiene," keeping the tip clean and replacing the cap, it has a shelf life measured in years.

When adding tall "field grass" to my scenery, this is also my adhesive of choice.  I like to add interiors to my structures, too, and I find Aileen's to be perfect for attaching the inkjet-printed interior images to the plastic walls.  It does not "bleed through" the paper and ruin the ink.

 

 

Actually the biggest problem I have Aiken is losing the tiny cap but the stuff is thick enough that it has never dried out or leaked on me.

Joe Staten Island West 

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