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Covered flatcar load

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  • Member since
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  • 595 posts
Covered flatcar load
Posted by mreagant on Friday, October 1, 2021 11:55 AM

I'm looking for suggestions for the cover of a load that won't be seen. I'd like it to be close to prototype, but if those are mostly canvas I'm not sure how to do it unless I use real canvas which I think would be hard to work with because I want it to conform to the shape of the load somewhat.

 

  • Member since
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  • From: Collinwood, Ohio, USA
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Posted by gmpullman on Friday, October 1, 2021 12:53 PM

There's this:

http://cs.trains.com/mrr/f/88/t/219063.aspx

 

There are several YouTube videos on the subject:

 

Use paper facial tissue or perhaps spent dryer sheets or those packaged alcohol wipes. Toilet tissue is designed to dissolve in water. Not a good choice for modeling.

Good Luck, Ed

  • Member since
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  • From: Southern Florida Gulf Coast
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Posted by SeeYou190 on Friday, October 1, 2021 1:12 PM

mreagant
I'd like it to be close to prototype, but if those are mostly canvas I'm not sure how to do it unless I use real canvas which I think would be hard to work with because I want it to conform to the shape of the load somewhat.

Canvas or tarps require careful shading and highlighting to make it look convincing. Indoor lighting will never recreate the reflective activity of sunlight on a large surface.

I love this Chooch casting with the torn tarp and a partially exposed load.

Without shading and highlighting, they just look like lumps.

To model a canvas covered load, I do not model the load. I work a slow setting hunk of epoxy putty into the basic shape and then emboss the surface with a piece of 120 grit sandpaper. That will look like canvas when painted properly. Most of the times it is difficult to tell what is underneath the canvas, so any shape can be convincing.

It is the folds towards the pull-points that are hard to get right.

-Kevin

Wink Happily modeling my STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD. A Class A line located in a personal fantasy world of semi-plausible nonsense on Tuesday, August 3rd, 1954.

  • Member since
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  • From: A Comfy Cave, New Zealand
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Posted by "JaBear" on Friday, October 1, 2021 5:37 PM
I used a piece of old worn thin cotton bed sheet, cut roughly to shape, placed over the deck then fixed down by using “white glue” diluted with water. After it dried, I then trimmed the edges with a razor knife and painted “almond”. I didn’t get as good as edge as I would have liked and you can also see where I got a little heavy handed with the glue!!Bang Head
 
Tarp by Bear, on Flickr
IMG_0922 by Bear, on Flickr
 
On this lifeboat I used tinfoil, which I had painted, then cut to shape, and glued in place using CA.
 
m42 by Bear, on Flickr
m43 by Bear, on Flickr
 
Cheers, the Bear.Smile

"One difference between pessimists and optimists is that while pessimists are more often right, optimists have far more fun."

  • Member since
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  • From: Fullerton, California
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Posted by hornblower on Wednesday, October 6, 2021 2:24 PM

You could also try gift wrap tissue paper.  It's thin enough that you should be able to shape it nicely using a little water and glue.

Hornblower

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Posted by mreagant on Wednesday, October 6, 2021 3:57 PM

I have assembled a couple of leftover building parts into the rough shape and I have an old wornout handkerchief ( no holes) that I am going to soak in brewed tea. If it's a disaster, lost 1 tea bag, a table spoon of white glue and a worthless piece of cotton cloth. Also we have a can of spray starch that I might experiment with.

Mike

  • Member since
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  • From: A Comfy Cave, New Zealand
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Posted by "JaBear" on Thursday, October 7, 2021 4:24 PM
Gidday Mike, the theory certainly sounds good, and I like the economics!
Please keep us informed as to the results.
Have fun,
Cheers, the Bear.Smile

"One difference between pessimists and optimists is that while pessimists are more often right, optimists have far more fun."

  • Member since
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  • From: Central Ohio
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Posted by basementdweller on Thursday, October 7, 2021 9:05 PM

Try experimenting with tissue paper. I have had good luck with dipping tissue paper in diluted white glue and draping over a load. Another option is to spray diluted glue onto tissue paper.

practice on scrap stuff and see if you like the results. 

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