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Old logs in a stream bed

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  • Member since
    August 2010
  • From: Columbia, IL
  • 394 posts
Old logs in a stream bed
Posted by wdcrvr on Monday, September 27, 2021 9:58 PM

I would like to know if anyone has a method to make a piece of twig look more like a waterlogged tree trunk that is half submerged in a river or stream.  Twigs just dont have the right color or texture.  Just dont look right to me.  Any help would be appreciated.

wdcrvr

  • Member since
    November 2013
  • 1,976 posts
Posted by snjroy on Tuesday, September 28, 2021 10:34 AM

Another tough one... I have never done this, but I know what lumber looks like in a river, having seen it multiple times in this area. Wet lumber has a dark grey look that is difficult to model. First you need to find the right twigs: We have a lot of trees and shrubs on our property, so it's pretty easy for me to find convincing twigs. Shrubs are a good source. I used a band saw to get a clean cut. The wet look might be achieved by applying a coat of varnish.

Maybe someone else will provide a more informed opinion on how to do this.

Simon

  • Member since
    July 2006
  • From: 4610 Metre's North of the Fortyninth on the left coast of Canada
  • 8,005 posts
Posted by BATMAN on Tuesday, September 28, 2021 10:57 AM

Try weathering powders, as wood rots, it tends to turn black from decay. Experiment by hitting it with dullcoat first and then use black, brown, and grey powder on it along with a couple of shades of green to represent different green stuff that may grow on it depending on the geographical area. The powders may give you just enough texture, if not add a little ground cover, foliage will often grow on dead things.

The best hint I ever got when it came to modeling nature was to use as many different colours/shades of colours as possible.

 

Brent

It's not the age honey, it's the mileage.

https://www.youtube.com/user/BATTRAIN1/videos 


  • Member since
    August 2006
  • 1,401 posts
Posted by trainnut1250 on Tuesday, September 28, 2021 12:28 PM

Here is what I am doing:

I find that sagebrush and rotten sticks work well as long as you get the grain and look right for the scale.

Here are the sagebrush pieces:

Alyssum roots:

I am also installing some JTT cattails and reeds:

Still don't have any water yet but getting there

 

Guy

see stuff at: the Willoughby Line Site

  • Member since
    July 2006
  • From: 4610 Metre's North of the Fortyninth on the left coast of Canada
  • 8,005 posts
Posted by BATMAN on Tuesday, September 28, 2021 12:36 PM

That sagebrush looks great Guy. If you really take a hard look at all the colours and shades on it, that shows what mother nature can offer over what we can pull off.

Brent

It's not the age honey, it's the mileage.

https://www.youtube.com/user/BATTRAIN1/videos 


  • Member since
    March 2002
  • From: Milwaukee WI (Fox Point)
  • 10,976 posts
Posted by dknelson on Wednesday, September 29, 2021 10:46 AM

What I recall from the creek across the street from my childhood home is that a really old log, one that became mostly submerged in the creek water, would become green.  We called it seaweed but of course it was not seaweed per se, but green and mossy.  Submerged rocks also got green in that same way.  

It also seemed like the bark was fairly quick to deteriorate in the water and peel off.

Dave Nelson

  • Member since
    August 2006
  • 1,401 posts
Posted by trainnut1250 on Saturday, October 2, 2021 10:53 AM

BATMAN

 that shows what mother nature can offer over what we can pull off.

 

Brent so true. I use as much natural rock and sticks, crushed leaves, dirt, etc that I can find for exactly that reason.

 

Guy

see stuff at: the Willoughby Line Site

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