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Do Peco’s ho turnouts have springs?

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Do Peco’s ho turnouts have springs?
Posted by JDawg on Sunday, May 9, 2021 5:41 PM

I know peco N scale switches have a built in spring, so you don't need an external device to throw the points. Is the same true of their HO turnouts? Or will I need ground throws?

JJF


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Posted by JDawg on Sunday, May 9, 2021 5:44 PM

I am specifically curious about their code 100 settrack line, BTW

JJF


Prototypically modeling the Great Northern in Minnesota with just a hint of freelancing. Smile, Wink & Grin

Yesterday is History.

Tomorrow is a Mystery.

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Posted by RR_Mel on Sunday, May 9, 2021 6:48 PM

This is a Peco code 100 turnout.




The tiny wire is the spring.



Mel
 
Modeling the early to mid 1950s SP in HO scale since 1951
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Posted by JDawg on Sunday, May 9, 2021 6:52 PM

Thanks Mel.

JJF


Prototypically modeling the Great Northern in Minnesota with just a hint of freelancing. Smile, Wink & Grin

Yesterday is History.

Tomorrow is a Mystery.

But today is a Gift, that is why it is called the Present. 

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Posted by doctorwayne on Sunday, May 9, 2021 7:56 PM

As long as the turnout is within easy reach, you can flip the points manually.  If the turnout is not readily within reach, you will need some sort of remote control.


For some such devices, such as a Tortoise, the spring apparently needs to be removed, as the machine cannot overcome the spring's resistance.  I believe that this applies to most other electrically-powered switch machines, too, although a manually-activated Blue Point switch machine should be able to easily overcome the built-in spring. 
I have them on most of my hard-to-reach turnouts, and am very satisfied with their performance.

Wayne

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Posted by Doughless on Monday, May 10, 2021 8:24 AM

I use Peco code 83s. They are sprung.  And the spring seems pretty high tension to me, strong.  

Just corroberating what Wayne has stated he has read.  I can say from personal experience that the code 83s require a strong throw.

I would assume the code 100s are not any weaker, but that is just my assumption.

- Douglas

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Posted by jjdamnit on Monday, May 10, 2021 11:04 AM

Hello All,

I use a mix of Atlas and PECO code 100 turnouts on my HO layout, all with remote switch machines.

Some are paired together so one controller activates both turnout switch machines on the crossovers, sidings, and wye.

I only pair Atlas with Atlas and PECO with PECO. Both use solenoid-type actuators.

The points on the Atlas turnouts are held in place by the turnout switch machines.

As has been posted the PECOs have a spring that holds the points in place.

The force needed by the PECO PL-11 side mounted turnout motor is significant to overcome the tension of the spring. To the extent that I needed to install PL-35 Capacitor Discharge Units.

Another problem with the PECO turnouts I have is the top of the throw bar linkage pin is rounded.

If the turnout motor is not securely fastened to the layout base, when activated, the link from the turnout motor will jump over the throw bar linkage. 

To solve this I drilled and tapped a hole in the throw bar, installed a 0-80 x 1/4-inch machine screw with a #0 flat washer on top, and secured it with a nut on the bottom.

Now when the turnout motor(s) are thrown the linkage does not separate from the force needed to overcome the tension of the spring.

When using a slow-motion Tortoise type turnout motor it is recommended the springs be removed on the PECO turnouts.

I have no experience with servo-type turnout motors.

Hope this helps.

"Uhh...I didn’t know it was 'impossible' I just made it work...sorry"

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Posted by Lastspikemike on Monday, May 10, 2021 2:41 PM

Walthers new line of turnouts also now have sprung throwbars.

A Peco under table solenoid motor (like their new twistlock) will work for those. 

Walthers new #6 turnout matches Atlas Customline Super Switch in Code 83 (now branded "Super Track) except the toe (entry straight) of the turnout is a bit shorter. 

Atlas Customline #6 are different again, the diverging route is shorter.

Alyth Yard

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Posted by bagal on Tuesday, May 11, 2021 5:35 AM

Yes, Peco code 83 has a spring. My experience has been that a Tortoise will require a larger wire, 0.032" I think, to drive against the spring, or remove the spring.

I think if I was to build a new layout I would finger flick the points and only use motors where reach is an issue. Then I would use Peco motors mounted under the roadbed.

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Posted by richhotrain on Tuesday, May 11, 2021 6:37 AM

bagal

Yes, Peco code 83 has a spring. My experience has been that a Tortoise will require a larger wire, 0.032" I think, to drive against the spring, or remove the spring.

I think if I was to build a new layout I would finger flick the points and only use motors where reach is an issue. Then I would use Peco motors mounted under the roadbed. 

That's what I have done on my new layout. I mostly have Peco Code 83 turnouts, all within reach, and I use my right index finger to flick the points. Works like a charm!

Rich

Alton Junction

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Posted by riogrande5761 on Tuesday, May 11, 2021 6:43 AM

bagal
I think if I was to build a new layout I would finger flick the points and only use motors where reach is an issue. Then I would use Peco motors mounted under the roadbed.

That's what I'm doing.  It's enough work and wiring to build a sizable layout.  Plus if you have a control panel,  you have to translate the diagram to the layout and try not to throw the wrong switch.  If you eliminate that fancy control panel, you just reach and throw.  Fewer mistakes throwing switches.

Rio Grande.  The Action Road  - Focus 1977-1983

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Posted by richhotrain on Tuesday, May 11, 2021 8:06 AM

riogrande5761
 
bagal
I think if I was to build a new layout I would finger flick the points and only use motors where reach is an issue. Then I would use Peco motors mounted under the roadbed. 

That's what I'm doing.  It's enough work and wiring to build a sizable layout.  Plus if you have a control panel,  you have to translate the diagram to the layout and try not to throw the wrong switch.  If you eliminate that fancy control panel, you just reach and throw.  Fewer mistakes throwing switches. 

Agreed.  100%.

Rich

Alton Junction

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Posted by Lastspikemike on Tuesday, May 11, 2021 8:35 AM

I'm building my yard with spring loaded turnouts. Not planning to install any switch motors there.

I have Walthers Layout Control System to install for the remotely located turnouts. I shall be a little annoyed if this System can't throw the sprung points on the new Walthers turnouts.

The Peco twin solenoid turnout motors are of an ancient design, robust and powerful. Even the new twistlock style are just a bright orange cased original design. Peco makes a low amperage version (the "W" version) that seems just as reliable. Not sure why. I use these interchangably. 

Connect all turnout motors to a CDU either from Circuitron or Peco (the Peco unit looks better, less radio shacky) and you'll never have a problem once those motors are properly aligned and wired. I prefer Peco the passing contact lever switches to activate those motors also.  Take up very little space and they have several Peco supplied mounting options. Four colours to choose from for the lever handles. 

Some object to the non prototypical snap sound and look as a sprung throwbar snaps over but since you can't really  see the turnout if it is far enough away to need a remote motor then really, why would thise things matter? I like to hear the snap confirming the points are thrown. The 1/87 sized switchman's voice doesn't carry well over the DCC sounds.

If the throwbar is stubborn, try your middle finger and get some respect....

Alyth Yard

Canada

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