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SUNDAY PUZZLE FUN 11-21-21 HAULING DIAMONDS 2

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SUNDAY PUZZLE FUN 11-21-21 HAULING DIAMONDS 2
Posted by pennytrains on Saturday, November 20, 2021 5:30 PM

HAULING DIAMONDS 2
57 WORDS

  1. Before we look at (_ _ _ _ _ _ _) cars and accessories designed to haul a (_ _ _ _) of simulated black diamonds, we’d be remiss if we overlooked the Nos. 716 and 2956 (_ _ _ _ _) and semi-scale hoppers Lionel introduced in 1940.
  2. A portent of the future, the two cars used the same (_ _ _ - _ _ _ _) highly detailed body shell, but differed in their (_ _ _ _ _) and (_ _ _ _ _ _ _) assemblies.  Both also came lettered for the (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) & Ohio Railroad with the No. 716 intended for use with the Nos. 700EW scale (_ _ _ _ _ _) and 701 0 - 6 - 0 switcher while the 2956 could run with any models equipped with (_ _ _) or latch couplers such as the No. 763E.
  3. (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) Flyer, of course, wasn’t sitting on their hands while (_ _ _ _ _ _) was marketing their (_ _ _ _ _ _) Nos. 96, 97 & 98 Coal (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _).  During the war years (and most likely even earlier than that) their designers were hard at work creating a coal (_ _ _ _ _ _) that often ranks higher on collectors’ hit parades.
  4. The A. F. No. 752 (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) Coaler stood 16 inches tall and required the operator to (_ _ _ _) Flyer’s No. 23 coal into a metal (_ _ _ _) either by hand or with a No. 716 Automatic Dump Car.
  5. Operating the (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) bucket to hoist coal up into the 752’s hopper was even more fascinating (and engaging) than watching the scoops on Lionel’s Nos. 96 & 97 elevators of 1938.
  6. The only possible drawback to the early No. 752 was that a (_ _ _) had to be in position under the (_ _ _ _ _), as the 1946 version had no way of storing it’s load.  This was “corrected” in 1951 when a solenoid was added to the 752A to allow the operator to unload the (_ _ _ _ _ _) at will.
  7. Back in (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _), Lionel’s factory began pumping out No. 2456 (_ _ _ _ _ _) Valley hoppers in 1948.  These (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) molded two (_ _ _) cars were an excellent compliment to the No. 97 reissued from 1946 through 1950.
  8. Also new in 1948 was the spectacularly messy No. 397 (_ _ _ _ _ _ - _ _ _ _) Coal Loader.  Priced at $10.95, $125.67 in today’s dollars, the 397 originally came with a (_ _ _ _) light, a (_ _ _ _ _ _) motor housing and a red (_ _ _ _ _ _ _) scoop assembly.
  9. Advertised as “by far the most (_ _ _ _ _ _ _), most (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) of all Lionel rail side accessories”, was the No. 456 Operating Coal (_ _ _ _) and (_ _ _ _ _ _) Car of 1950.  The included No. 456-38 receiving bin was designed to transfer the (_ _ _ _ _ _ _) coal into the scoop of a No. 397 by utilizing a pair of included (_ _ _ _ _).
  10. Sold separately for $5.75 ($60.01) in 1952, the essential No. 3456 (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ - _ _ _ - _ _ _ _ _ _ _) operating hopper is much more common than the No. 456 (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) it was designed to work with.  And rightly so.  It’s a (_ _ _ _ _ _ _) that belongs in every collection.
  11. Interestingly, when Lionel introduced it’s near scale (_ _ _ _) hopper in 1954, it was a (_ _ _ _ _ _ _) type lettered for the N & W.  It was also labeled as a “(_ _ _ _ _ _) Car” which is fine, but the N & W was largely a (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) hauling road.  It wouldn’t be until 1972 with the No. 9111 (_ _ _ _ _ _) car  that model railroaders would have a (_ _ _ _) car lettered for the (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) favorite.
  12. Along the way, the Lehigh Valley continued to haul the majority of the black (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) in Lionelville.  And while many of those cars were (_ _ _ _ _) two - bay models, there are some interesting and (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) cars in both two and four bay versions.
  13. Look for a (_ _ _ _ _ _) red painted No. 6456-50 hopper with white (_ _ _ _ - _ _ _ _ _ _ _) reporting marks from 1954.  Equally rare but a lot less flashy is the No. 6176-100.  Since the car bears no (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _), collectors only know the number of this (_ _ _ _ _) two - bay car because of the Lionel (_ _ _ _ _ _ _) manual listing.
  14. Another car worth searching for is the No. 6636 (_ _ _ _ _ _) Railroad quad hopper from 1959.  Simple in decoration, at least compared to the 6464-825 boxcar, the ARR 6636 came in black with yellow (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) marks and included the (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) bar Lionel began adding to the large hoppers in 1957.  Since the four - bay hopper car debuted with the cover and (_ _ _ _ _ _ _), it wasn’t discovered until later that the sides of the cars would be prone to (_ _ _ _ _ _ _) if left unsupported.

    To be continued…

Big Smile  Same me, different spelling!  Big Smile

  • Member since
    July 2020
  • 588 posts
Posted by pennytrains on Saturday, November 27, 2021 4:55 PM

HAULING DIAMONDS 2
57 WORDS

  1. Before we look at (POSTWAR) cars and accessories designed to haul a (LOAD) of simulated black diamonds, we’d be remiss if we overlooked the Nos. 716 and 2956 (SCALE) and semi-scale hoppers Lionel introduced in 1940.
  2. A portent of the future, the two cars used the same (DIE - CAST) highly detailed body shell, but differed in their (TRUCK) and (COUPLER) assemblies.  Both also came lettered for the (BALTIMORE) & Ohio Railroad with the No. 716 intended for use with the Nos. 700EW scale (HUDSON) and 701 0 - 6 - 0 switcher while the 2956 could run with any models equipped with (BOX) or latch couplers such as the No. 763E.
  3. (AMERICAN) Flyer, of course, wasn’t sitting on their hands while (LIONEL) was marketing their (PREWAR) Nos. 96, 97 & 98 Coal (ELEVATORS).  During the war years (and most likely even earlier than that) their designers were hard at work creating a coal (LOADER) that often ranks higher on collectors’ hit parades.
  4. The A. F. No. 752 (SEABOARD) Coaler stood 16 inches tall and required the operator to (DUMP) Flyer’s No. 23 coal into a metal (TRAY) either by hand or with a No. 716 Automatic Dump Car.
  5. Operating the (CLAMSHELL) bucket to hoist coal up into the 752’s hopper was even more fascinating (and engaging) than watching the scoops on Lionel’s Nos. 96 & 97 elevators of 1938.
  6. The only possible drawback to the early No. 752 was that a (CAR) had to be in position under the (CHUTE), as the 1946 version had no way of storing it’s load.  This was “corrected” in 1951 when a solenoid was added to the 752A to allow the operator to unload the (BUNKER) at will.
  7. Back in (IRVINGTON), Lionel’s factory began pumping out No. 2456 (LEHIGH) Valley hoppers in 1948.  These (INJECTION) molded two (BAY) cars were an excellent compliment to the No. 97 reissued from 1946 through 1950.
  8. Also new in 1948 was the spectacularly messy No. 397 (DIESEL - TYPE) Coal Loader.  Priced at $10.95, $125.67 in today’s dollars, the 397 originally came with a (YARD) light, a (YELLOW) motor housing and a red (PAINTED) scoop assembly.
  9. .Advertised as “by far the most (UNUSUAL), most (FASCINATING) of all Lionel rail side accessories”, was the No. 456 Operating Coal (RAMP) and (HOPPER) Car of 1950.  The included No. 456-38 receiving bin was designed to transfer the (PLASTIC) coal into the scoop of a No. 397 by utilizing a pair of included (POSTS).
  10. Sold separately for $5.75 ($60.01) in 1952, the essential No. 3456 (NORFOLK - AND - WESTERN) operating hopper is much more common than the No. 456 (UNLOADER) it was designed to work with.  And rightly so.  It’s a (CLASSIC) that belongs in every collection.
  11. Interestingly, when Lionel introduced it’s near scale (QUAD) hopper in 1954, it was a (COVERED) type lettered for the N & W.  It was also labeled as a “(CEMENT) Car” which is fine, but the N & W was largely a (BITUMINOUS) hauling road.  It wouldn’t be until 1972 with the No. 9111 (TUSCAN) car  that model railroaders would have a (COAL) car lettered for the (VIRGINIA) favorite.
  12. Along the way, the Lehigh Valley continued to haul the majority of the black (DIAMONDS) in Lionelville.  And while many of those cars were (BLACK) two - bay models, there are some interesting and (COLLECTABLE) cars in both two and four bay versions.
  13. Look for a (GLOSSY) red painted No. 6456-50 hopper with white (HEAT - STAMPED) reporting marks from 1954.  Equally rare but a lot less flashy is the No. 6176-100.  Since the car bears no (MARKINGS), collectors only know the number of this (OLIVE) two - bay car because of the Lionel (SERVICE) manual listing.
  14. Another car worth searching for is the No. 6636 (ALASKA) Railroad quad hopper from 1959.  Simple in decoration, at least compared to the 6464-825 boxcar, the ARR 6636 came in black with yellow (REPORTING) marks and included the (SPREADER) bar Lionel began adding to the large hoppers in 1957.  Since the four - bay hopper car debuted with the cover and (HATCHES), it wasn’t discovered until later that the sides of the cars would be prone to (WARPAGE) if left unsupported.

    To be continued…

Big Smile  Same me, different spelling!  Big Smile

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