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SUNDAY PUZZLE FUN 11-14-21 HAULING DIAMONDS 1

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  • Member since
    July 2020
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SUNDAY PUZZLE FUN 11-14-21 HAULING DIAMONDS 1
Posted by pennytrains on Saturday, November 13, 2021 5:47 PM

HAULING DIAMONDS 1
59 WORDS

  1. Nope.  Not the kind that come out of South (_ _ _ _ _ _ _) jewel mines.  We’re talking (_ _ _ _ _) diamonds; (_ _ _ _).
  2. Believe it or not, (_ _ _ _ _ _) didn’t catalog a hopper car until the No. 803 arrived in 1923.  The dark (_ _ _ _ _) four wheeler was equipped with (_ _ _ _) couplers and wore (_ _ _ _ _ _) - stamped markings initially.
  3. The 803 would gain (_ _ _ _ _) couplers in late 1923 and nickel (_ _ _ _ _ _ _) boxes in 1925.  Two years later, brass (_ _ _ _ _ _ _) began dressing up the car until, in 1929, the car became (_ _ _ _ _ _ _) and also received brass nameplates.
  4. “But wait!”, you say, “I could swear Lionel made (_ _ _ _ _ _) cars prior to 1923!”  And you’d be half-right if not for the (_ _ _ _ _ _ _) descriptions.  True, the No. 116 looks an awful lot like the kind of car most of us would call a “hopper”.  However, both that car and the larger No. 16 model a car with a more specialized purpose than ones designed for (_ _ _ _ _ _ _) service.
  5. The Nos. 16 and 1196 were (_ _ _ _ _ _ _) cars of the type that track laying and (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) of way crews would use.  But the two are very different models.  The No. 1196 is a (_ _ _ _ _ _) dump car introduced in 1910 while the No. 16 of 1906 is a (_ _ _ _) dump car more akin to a (_ _ _ _ _ _ _) than a coal hopper.
  6. Twenty years into the Standard Gauge era, the No. 216 hopper car finally modeled a modern hopper in (_ _ _ _) green.  The brighter and smaller (_ _ _) No. 516 replaced the No. 116 in 1928 and was the only prewar car to come with a simulated (_ _ _ _).
  7. I suppose it’s possible that big twin-motored locos like a 408E could pull a few 216’s loaded with (_ _ _ _) crushed (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _), but otherwise3 there’s no explanation as to why the 216 never received the bumpy (_ _ _ _ _) inserts that make the 516 distinctive.
  8. Whatever it was that enterprising and imaginative hopper owners loaded into their Standard and (_ - _ _ _ _ _) cars during the twenties and most of the (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _), it wasn’t until the No. 97 (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) Coal (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) appeared that model (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) had an accessory to do the loading for them.
  9. Introduced in 1938, the tall No. 97 required two parallel tracks spaced about (_ _ _ _ _ _ _) inches on center to operate.  Barring an elaborate dogbone track scheme, Lionel was assured to sell at least one (_ _ _ _ _ _ _) to a coal elevator customer.
  10. On one side there was a dump (_ _ _) where operators could discharge loads.  Most likely from the new No. 3659 Operating (_ _ _ _) Car introduced that same year.  If they purchased the No. 188 “O” Gauge Coal Elevator, Car and (_ _ _ _ _) set for $12.75 ($250.11 in today’s money) they got everything for $5.25 more than the cost of the No. 97 alone.
  11. With a bit of landscaping to raise the (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) higher, the 97 could be used with a No. 216 and it’s kin.  However, by this late date (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) Gauge was on it’s way out and Lionel’s leaders were moving more and more toward (_ _ _ _ _ _ _) and O - Gauge in particular.
  12. The 97 wasn’t alone of course.  It was one of (_ _ _ _ _) accessories released at the same time to load coal.  All used the same (_ _ _ _ _ - _ _ _ _ _) tower, red (_ _ _ _ _ _) and red-roofed yellow (_ _ _ _ _ _).  But only the No. 97 was 100% (_ _ _ _ _ _) (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _).
  13. On the Nos. 97 and 96, priced at $7.50 and $5.00 respectively in 1929, ($149.24 and $99.49 if you bought them today) the base was seven by (_ _ _ _ _ _) inches including the “(_ _ _ _)” as the catalog described the receiving bin.  (By the way, the 1938 prices were $5.95 and $3.95 for these accessories.  To put that price change in perspective, the value of a dollar went up by 1.4% from 38 to 39, roughly 1 cent.  Lionel’s price increases were $1.55 and $1.05 respectively which is still in line with the 1.4%.  But, if we take those numbers and adjust them for 21st century inflation we get $116.72 for the 97 and $77.48 for the 96, or roughly a 1861.6% increase since 1938.)
  14. On the rear of the tower was the “Open (_ _ _ _ _ _) Column” containing the “(_ _ _ _ _ _ _) chain” of (_ _ _ _ _ _ _) that lifted the (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) “coal” up into the bunker.  The only difference between the two accessories was that the chain / bucket mechanism was (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) operated by means of a hand (_ _ _ _ _) on the 96 whereas a (_ _ _ _ _) did the work on the 97.
  15. The No. 98 Elevated Coal (_ _ _ _ _ _ _) Bunker didn’t need the large base since it lacked the chain / bucket assembly altogether.  Instead, the (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) needed to load the coal by means of a metal (_ _ _ _ _) installed were the open girder column would be.
  16. Discharge into a hopper, gondola or dump car was, however, the same on all three models.  By pressing a button on the (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _), a (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) was activated under the bunker to open a (_ _ _ _ _) and release the black diamonds, whether they be simulated anthracite, bituminous or lignite.
  17. After WWII, the No. 97 became a component of the No. 4110WS (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) Control Set priced at $199.95 in 1948, or $2,294.77 if you’re keeping score.  More on (_ _ _ _ _ _ _) cars and accessories in part 2.

    To be continued…

Big Smile  Same me, different spelling!  Big Smile

  • Member since
    July 2020
  • 588 posts
Posted by pennytrains on Saturday, November 20, 2021 5:25 PM

HAULING DIAMONDS 1
59 WORDS

  1. Nope.  Not the kind that come out of South (AFRICAN) jewel mines.  We’re talking (BLACK) diamonds; (COAL).
  2. Believe it or not, (LIONEL) didn’t catalog a hopper car until the No. 803 arrived in 1923.  The dark (GREEN) four wheeler was equipped with (HOOK) couplers and wore (RUBBER) - stamped markings initially.
  3. The 803 would gain (LATCH) couplers in late 1923 and nickel (JOURNAL) boxes in 1925.  Two years later, brass (LADDERS) began dressing up the car until, in 1929, the car became (PEACOCK) and also received brass nameplates.
  4. “But wait!”, you say, “I could swear Lionel made (HOPPER) cars prior to 1923!”  And you’d be half-right if not for the (CATALOG) descriptions.  True, the No. 116 looks an awful lot like the kind of car most of us would call a “hopper”.  However, both that car and the larger No. 16 model a car with a more specialized purpose than ones designed for (MINERAL) service.
  5. The Nos. 16 and 1196 were (BALLAST) cars of the type that track laying and (MAINTENANCE) of way crews would use.  But the two are very different models.  The No. 1196 is a (BOTTOM) dump car introduced in 1910 while the No. 16 of 1906 is a (SIDE) dump car more akin to a (GONDOLA) than a coal hopper.
  6. Twenty years into the Standard Gauge era, the No. 216 hopper car finally modeled a modern hopper in (DARK) green.  The brighter and smaller (RED) No. 516 replaced the No. 116 in 1928 and was the only prewar car to come with a simulated (LOAD).
  7. I suppose it’s possible that big twin-motored locos like a 408E could pull a few 216’s loaded with (REAL) crushed (ANTHRACITE), but otherwise3 there’s no explanation as to why the 216 never received the bumpy (STEEL) inserts that make the 516 distinctive.
  8. Whatever it was that enterprising and imaginative hopper owners loaded into their Standard and (O - GAUGE) cars during the twenties and most of the (THIRTIES), it wasn’t until the No. 97 (MOTORIZED) Coal (ELEVATOR) appeared that model (RAILROADERS) had an accessory to do the loading for them.
  9. Introduced in 1938, the tall No. 97 required two parallel tracks spaced about (FIFTEEN) inches on center to operate.  Barring an elaborate dogbone track scheme, Lionel was assured to sell at least one (TURNOUT) to a coal elevator customer.
  10. On one side there was a dump (BIN) where operators could discharge loads.  Most likely from the new No. 3659 Operating (DUMP) Car introduced that same year.  If they purchased the No. 188 “O” Gauge Coal Elevator, Car and (TRACK) set for $12.75 ($250.11 in today’s money) they got everything for $5.25 more than the cost of the No. 97 alone.
  11. With a bit of landscaping to raise the (ACCESSORY) higher, the 97 could be used with a No. 216 and it’s kin.  However, by this late date (STANDARD) Gauge was on it’s way out and Lionel’s leaders were moving more and more toward (REALISM) and O - Gauge in particular.
  12. The 97 wasn’t alone of course.  It was one of (THREE) accessories released at the same time to load coal.  All used the same (SHEET - METAL) tower, red (LADDER) and red-roofed yellow (BUNKER).  But only the No. 97 was 100% (REMOTE) (CONTROLLED).
  13. On the Nos. 97 and 96, priced at $7.50 and $5.00 respectively in 1929, ($149.24 and $99.49 if you bought them today) the base was seven by (TWELVE) inches including the “(WELL)” as the catalog described the receiving bin.  (By the way, the 1938 prices were $5.95 and $3.95 for these accessories.  To put that price change in perspective, the value of a dollar went up by 1.4% from 38 to 39, roughly 1 cent.  Lionel’s price increases were $1.55 and $1.05 respectively which is still in line with the 1.4%.  But, if we take those numbers and adjust them for 21st century inflation we get $116.72 for the 97 and $77.48 for the 96, or roughly a 1861.6% increase since 1938.)
  14. On the rear of the tower was the “Open (GIRDER) Column” containing the “(ENDLESS) chain” of (BUCKETS) that lifted the (BAKELITE) “coal” up into the bunker.  The only difference between the two accessories was that the chain / bucket mechanism was (MANUALLY) operated by means of a hand (CRANK) on the 96 whereas a (MOTOR) did the work on the 97.
  15. The No. 98 Elevated Coal (STORAGE) Bunker didn’t need the large base since it lacked the chain / bucket assembly altogether.  Instead, the (OPERATOR) needed to load the coal by means of a metal (CHUTE) installed were the open girder column would be.
  16. Discharge into a hopper, gondola or dump car was, however, the same on all three models.  By pressing a button on the (CONTROLLER), a (SOLENOID) was activated under the bunker to open a (HATCH) and release the black diamonds, whether they be simulated anthracite, bituminous or lignite.
  17. After WWII, the No. 97 became a component of the No. 4110WS (ELECTRONIC) Control Set priced at $199.95 in 1948, or $2,294.77 if you’re keeping score.  More on (POSTWAR) cars and accessories in part 2.

    To be continued…

Big Smile  Same me, different spelling!  Big Smile

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