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SUNDAY PUZZLE FUN 11-7-21 S. T. P. PART 5

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SUNDAY PUZZLE FUN 11-7-21 S. T. P. PART 5
Posted by pennytrains on Saturday, November 6, 2021 5:49 PM

S. T. P. PART 5
64 WORDS

  1. Switch to a lower case letter “T” now as we’re going to explore (_ _ _ _ _ _ _) Milwaukee and (_ _. - _ _ _ _) type locomotives.  They’re the only (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) Flyer, (_ _ _ _) and Lionel modeled at the same time in the same gauge.
  2. We’ll start with (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) Flyer’s No. 4637.  It wasn’t the first, (_ _ _ _ _ _ ‘ _) No. 380 predated it by five years, and the Ives 3237 came out two years before Flyer’s loco hit the market.  But the 15 inch long A. F. loco was equipped with an extra special feature and thereby deserves special recognition.
  3. A tiny brass (_ _ _) extended from the front of the cab, under the (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) and terminated at an (_ _ _) on one side of the tiny brass bell’s yoke.  When energized, the bell swung back and forth in time with the (_ _ _ _ _ _ _) of the real bell attached to the (_ _ _ _ _).  This neat bit of (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) gave Flyer’s “(_ _ _ _ _ _)” a unique sales advantage.
  4. To be honest, the (_ _ _ _ _), red and (_ _ _) color scheme of this loco isn’t my favorite.  Maybe if they had left out the red, I’d like it better.  But, nevertheless, it’s a key part of (_ _ _) train history, and it’s extra trim and longer (_ _ _ _ _) help it outshine the 13 ¼ inch long red and (_ _ _ _) Nos. 4635 & 4633 models that came out in 1929 & 30 respectively.
  5. Lionel’s No. 380 of 1923 was, as mentioned, the first (_ _ _ _ - _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) Standard (or Wide) Gauge model locomotive designed along the lines of the (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) Road EP-2 (_ _  - _ _ _ _ _) of 1918.  However, the 13 ½ inch long 0 - B - 0 No. 380 is just a few axles shy of the prototype’s 1 - B + D + D + B - 1 wheel arrangement.
  6. To be fair, Lionel did commission a one - of - a - kind, 3 ¼ inch Gauge, triple (_ _ _ _ _ - _ _ _ _ _) equipped test model from Societa (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) La Precisa in 1927.  But at 28 inches in length, even if the super wealthy chose to spoil their kid with one of these magnificent beasts, this “Super Wide Gauge” loco would have run in only the big ballrooms of the wealthiest parent’s mansions.  Even in the expansive economy of those days the 381SS would have been tough to sell in numbers large enough to justify creation of the tooling required to manufacture it.
  7. If you’re keeping score, that’s two (_ _ _ _ _) for the No. 380, six for the 381SS and fourteen for the real EP-2.  In fact, nobody did better than (_ _ _), not in (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) Gauge anyways.  All three leading manufacturers had two axle models, but only Lionel and Ives went beyond four (_ _ _ _ _ _).
  8. But let’s stick with the 380/380E for a moment.  It’s (_ _ _ _ _ _) windows and centered door made it look more like an (_ _ _) loco than one that ran in (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) state.  Also curious is the fact that the earliest 380’s lacked pantographs and had an extra-large (_ _ _ _ _ _ _) and bell atop it’s hoods instead.
  9. Ives did a little better simulating an EP-2 with their 0 - B - 0 No. 3237.  The large (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) windows on the loco’s squared-off cab are more prototypical, as are the separately-applied brass (_ _ _ _ _) covers and the (_ _ _ _ _) stamped into the rounded hoods.
  10. The 3237 was likely produced to compete with Lionel’s No. 380 rather than the No. 10 that was introduced in Lionel’s 1925 (_ _ _ _ _ _ _).  The 10’s pulled low-priced (_ _ _ _ _ _ _) and (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) sets along side Lionel’s No. 8 (_ _ _ _ _ _).  Be aware that extremely rare Ives 3237’s came with (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) (_ _ _ _ _ _ _) plates.
  11. Atop the Ives and Lionel rosters were, of course, the 3245R and 381E.  Both were introduced in (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ - _ _ _ _ _ _ - _ _ _ _ _) and both deserve the title “(_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _)” although only the Ives model was frequently marketed as such.
  12. The first version of the 3245 used the (_ _ _ _) and modified (_ _ _ _ _) of the earlier 3237.  Attached to each end of the frame was a large curved brass (_ _ _ _ _ _) plate on which the flat “s - shaped” (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) bracket would ride.  This let the (_ _ _ _ _) trucks pivot without damaging the frame.
  13. A few 3245’s have been found with (_ _ _ _ - _ _ _ _) frames and the Ives Train Society believes these rare locos may have been sold in (_ _ _ _) that included only Ives (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ - _ _ _ _ _).  Remember, Ives was in (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) at this time and many cataloged Ives sets included Lionel and/or (_ _ _ _ _) complete cars and/or car parts.
  14. The later (_ _ _ _) hood 3245’s are the one’s best remembered.  Even though they can correctly be described as a (_ _ _ _ _ _) product.  They were equipped with Lionel’s (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) pantographs and pulled Flyer’s big 19 inch cars in set No. 1088, priced at $71.75 in 1929, or a whopping $1,150.98 in 2021 greenbacks!
  15. By 1929, Lionel had become sole owner of Ives, and (_ _ _ _ _) now had his prize.  Soon the patented Ives sequence (_ _ _ _ _ _ _) mechanism would go down in history as the Lionel “(_ - _ _ _ _)”.
  16. But not on the (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) reverse equipped 381E of 1928.  “Reversing” was not the locomotive’s biggest problem however.  That distinction goes to the twenty eight pounds of (_ _ _ _ _) cars the 381E was assigned to pull at the head of the (_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _) Limited.  But even with the shortcoming of having to leave one car out of the consist, the 381E is still the favorite among collectors who prefer locos that represent the (_ _ _ _ _ _ _) - Tacoma run.  Yours truly included.

Big Smile  Same me, different spelling!  Big Smile

  • Member since
    July 2020
  • 588 posts
Posted by pennytrains on Saturday, November 13, 2021 5:42 PM

S. T. P. PART 5
64 WORDS

  1. Switch to a lower case letter “T” now as we’re going to explore (CHICAGO) Milwaukee and (ST. - PAUL) type locomotives.  They’re the only (ELECTRICS) Flyer, (IVES) and Lionel modeled at the same time in the same gauge.
  2. We’ll start with (AMERICAN) Flyer’s No. 4637.  It wasn’t the first, (LIONEL ‘ S) No. 380 predated it by five years, and the Ives 3237 came out two years before Flyer’s loco hit the market.  But the 15 inch long A. F. loco was equipped with an extra special feature and thereby deserves special recognition.
  3. A tiny brass (ROD) extended from the front of the cab, under the (PANTOGRAPH) and terminated at an (ARM) on one side of the tiny brass bell’s yoke.  When energized, the bell swung back and forth in time with the (RINGING) of the real bell attached to the (MOTOR).  This neat bit of (ANIMATION) gave Flyer’s “(SHASTA)” a unique sales advantage.
  4. To be honest, the (GREEN), red and (TAN) color scheme of this loco isn’t my favorite.  Maybe if they had left out the red, I’d like it better.  But, nevertheless, it’s a key part of (TOY) train history, and it’s extra trim and longer (HOODS) help it outshine the 13 ¼ inch long red and (GRAY) Nos. 4635 & 4633 models that came out in 1929 & 30 respectively.
  5. Lionel’s No. 380 of 1923 was, as mentioned, the first (MASS - PRODUCED) Standard (or Wide) Gauge model locomotive designed along the lines of the (MILWAUKEE) Road EP-2 (BI - POLAR) of 1918.  However, the 13 ½ inch long 0 - B - 0 No. 380 is just a few axles shy of the prototype’s 1 - B + D + D + B - 1 wheel arrangement.
  6. To be fair, Lionel did commission a one - of - a - kind, 3 ¼ inch Gauge, triple (SUPER - MOTOR) equipped test model from Societa (MECCANICA) La Precisa in 1927.  But at 28 inches in length, even if the super wealthy chose to spoil their kid with one of these magnificent beasts, this “Super Wide Gauge” loco would have run in only the big ballrooms of the wealthiest parent’s mansions.  Even in the expansive economy of those days the 381SS would have been tough to sell in numbers large enough to justify creation of the tooling required to manufacture it.
  7. If you’re keeping score, that’s two (AXLES) for the No. 380, six for the 381SS and fourteen for the real EP-2.  In fact, nobody did better than (SIX), not in (STANDARD) Gauge anyways.  All three leading manufacturers had two axle models, but only Lionel and Ives went beyond four (WHEELS).
  8. But let’s stick with the 380/380E for a moment.  It’s (ARCHED) windows and centered door made it look more like an (NYC) loco than one that ran in (WASHINGTON) state.  Also curious is the fact that the earliest 380’s lacked pantographs and had an extra-large (WHISTLE)    and bell atop it’s hoods instead.
  9. Ives did a little better simulating an EP-2 with their 0 - B - 0 No. 3237.  The large (RECTANGULAR) windows on the loco’s squared-off cab are more prototypical, as are the separately-applied brass (HATCH) covers and the (VENTS) stamped into the rounded hoods.
  10. The 3237 was likely produced to compete with Lionel’s No. 380 rather than the No. 10 that was introduced in Lionel’s 1925 (CATALOG).  The 10’s pulled low-priced (FREIGHT) and (PASSENGER) sets along side Lionel’s No. 8 (BOXCAB).  Be aware that extremely rare Ives 3237’s came with (SOUTHERN) (PACIFIC) plates.
  11. Atop the Ives and Lionel rosters were, of course, the 3245R and 381E.  Both were introduced in (NINETEEN - TWENTY - EIGHT) and both deserve the title “(OLYMPIAN)” although only the Ives model was frequently marketed as such.
  12. The first version of the 3245 used the (BODY) and modified (FRAME) of the earlier 3237.  Attached to each end of the frame was a large curved brass (SWIVEL) plate on which the flat “s - shaped” (ARTICULATION) bracket would ride.  This let the (GUIDE) trucks pivot without damaging the frame.
  13. A few 3245’s have been found with (CAST - IRON) frames and the Ives Train Society believes these rare locos may have been sold in (SETS) that included only Ives (ROLLING - STOCK).  Remember, Ives was in (RECEIVERSHIP) at this time and many cataloged Ives sets included Lionel and/or (FLYER) complete cars and/or car parts.
  14. The later (LONG) hood 3245’s are the one’s best remembered.  Even though they can correctly be described as a (LIONEL) product.  They were equipped with Lionel’s (OPERATING) pantographs and pulled Flyer’s big 19 inch cars in set No. 1088, priced at $71.75 in 1929, or a whopping $1,150.98 in 2021 greenbacks!
  15. By 1929, Lionel had become sole owner of Ives, and (COWEN) now had his prize.  Soon the patented Ives sequence (REVERSE) mechanism would go down in history as the Lionel “(E - UNIT)”.
  16. But not on the (PENDULUM) reverse equipped 381E of 1928.  “Reversing” was not the locomotive’s biggest problem however.  That distinction goes to the twenty eight pounds of (STATE) cars the 381E was assigned to pull at the head of the (TRANSCONTINENTAL) Limited.  But even with the shortcoming of having to leave one car out of the consist, the 381E is still the favorite among collectors who prefer locos that represent the (OTHELLO) - Tacoma run.  Yours truly included.

Big Smile  Same me, different spelling!  Big Smile

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