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New England's Largest?

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Posted by Fr.Al on Thursday, December 2, 2021 1:44 PM

It was the one superheater equipped Mallet, 1204, which hung on until 1934. The other three were retired earlier.

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Posted by rcdrye on Thursday, December 2, 2021 6:24 AM

It's not even clear how much the Mallets were used in Hoosac Tunnel service.  They were on the B&M less than six months.  Oil firing, undersized firebox and small drivers were some of the issues even before the electrics made them completely surplus.  MEC converted them to coal, used them on the Mountain Division (Crawford Notch) and happily replaced them with 2-8-2s when those were deliverd.  Only one of the Mallets ever got a superheater. MEC's S class mikes were delivered in 1916 and delivered about 51,000 lbs of tractive force - less than the Mallets but without the front engine slip.

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Posted by daveklepper on Thursday, December 2, 2021 4:26 AM

As far as I know, no Niagra ever ran on the Boston and Albany, which was one of the first parts of the New York Central System to be 100% diesel.   1950 or 1951.  One may have operated in test, but not in regular service.  Mohawks did run regularly on the B&A on heavy passenger trains that the Hudsons could not handle without helpers.

And I simply did not know that the Maine Central Mallets  originsally ran on the B&M.  Thanks!  Interesting that they were bought while the tunnel electrification was already under plan and/or construction.  So, possibly, sale to the MEC was planned as part of the B&M's purchase plan?

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Posted by MidlandMike on Wednesday, December 1, 2021 9:08 PM

Did NYC Niagarans ever make it to the B&A ?

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Posted by timz on Wednesday, December 1, 2021 1:23 PM

Steamlocomotive.com says the 2-10-4 had 60-inch drivers, 27 x 32 cylinders, and 250 psi with limited cutoff. It says the 2-6+6-2 had 61-inch drivers, cyl 22 x 30 and 35 x 30 and 200 psi. So the 2-10-4 has 77700 lb nominal TE (at 80% MEP) and the 2-6+6-2 has 58000 lb in compound. The 2-10-4 has more horsepower no doubt, and far more weight, if we can believe steamlocomotive.com.

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Posted by Fr.Al on Wednesday, December 1, 2021 12:41 PM

I believe that is the case. I don't have the statistics for the B&M Mallets handy. However, Solomon's book on North American locomotives has the numbers for the B&A's 2-6-6-2"types and the CV 2-10-4s. So the CV engines are New England's largest.

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Posted by timz on Wednesday, December 1, 2021 12:23 PM

If the criterion for "most powerful" is nominal (calculated) tractive effort, the 2-10-4 might well have beat the 2-6+6-2, if the Mallet's TE was calculated in compound. Might have beat it on weight too, esp if tender is included.

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Posted by Fr.Al on Wednesday, December 1, 2021 8:51 AM

Dave: According to this CT Fallen Flags Sept 30,2019-In 1910, B&M recieved four oil-fired 2-6-6-2 Mallets for use through Hoosac Tunnel. They were replaced in 1911 by electric locomotives and sold to MEC....however, the last one, MEC 1204 was scrapped in 1934. 

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Posted by daveklepper on Wednesday, December 1, 2021 3:29 AM

2-6-6-2 Mallets on the B&M?  Possibly borrowed power under USRA operation during WWI, but not B&M-owned.

The CV's 2-10-4s were the most powerful steam New England locomotives and the heaviest New  England loconotives.  The most poweerdul New England locomotives were the New Haven's EF-3 anf EF=3a electrics, evn more powerful that the GG-1.

 

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New England's Largest?
Posted by Fr.Al on Tuesday, November 30, 2021 7:29 PM

I enjoyed seeing the Central Vermont T3-a 2-10-4 on the cover of the CT Winter issue. Looking through Brian Solomon's book" North American Locomotives", one reads that they were New England's heaviest and most powerful engines, but the lightest 2-10-4s ever built.

      I'm pretty sure the B&M had 2-6-6-2 Mallets. Is it possible that they were smaller than the T3-a? Or maybe the New York Central ran larger power on the B&A?

     The same book notes that the CV didn't run the 2-10-4s south of Brattleboro, VT because if weight restrictions.

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