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Classic Train Questions Part Deux (50 Years or Older)

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Posted by Overmod on Saturday, December 4, 2021 11:56 AM

I haven't forgotten -- just not taken the time.  Still don't have a quality question ready, but I'm bumping the thread to keep it visible.

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Posted by daveklepper on Thursday, October 21, 2021 7:35 AM

Because of the short period involved, steam power required at Newark or Rahway ran light from (and to)  Jersey City or South Amboy, whivch were facilities in-use both before and after electrification.

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Posted by Overmod on Tuesday, October 19, 2021 4:57 PM

Can you post pictures of the engine-change facilities at Newark and Rahway for that short time?  I'd expect that even Depression-era PRR freight traffic would require extensive numbers of locomotives before the electrification was complete.

And I had a detailed account of how engine change in Paoli was conducted - was it in one of Bill Volkmer's books, or Churella's - but can't find it now.  It was interesting reading about something relatively nonobvious but of critical practical importance, like the 'relief arrangements' on Lindbergh's Spirit of St. Louis...

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Posted by daveklepper on Tuesday, October 19, 2021 3:00 AM

Overmod, I'll give you the  credit.  Wilmington is correct for both Washington and St. Chasrles and was permanent for St. Charles trains.  South Amboy did come a short tinme later, with trains for the New York and Long Branch getting steam at Newark or Rahway for a short time.

Paoli was the change point for trains to the west.

Your question

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Posted by Overmod on Monday, October 18, 2021 1:39 PM

daveklepper
When the 11000V 25Hz AC electrification was extended from Trenton to Sunnyside Yard...

To put this in perspective, the route was fully electrified from New York to Wilmington at this point, but not to Washington.  That would have been an additional  engine-change point of interest here...

...where was the engine change point for:

Trains to Pittsburgh, Chicago, Cincinnati, and St. Louis?

These would have diverged at North Philadelphia  and presumably gotten the engine change near Paoli.  For some reason I remember the actual engine service facilities for steam being some distance from the actual change point.

Trains to Washington, DC and south?

Not until Wilmington.

Trains to Atlantic City?  (The Nellie Bly)?This might depend upon coming from where.  From Philadelphia I think they were steam the whole way, over the Delair Bridge.  From New York I think they may have gone via Jamesburg although I don't know when the piece of the 'secondary' between South Amboy and Monmouth Junction was electrified.  

Trains to Cape Charles?

Probably same as Washington trains at that point, as the Del-Mar-Va trains diverged at Wilmington.

Trains to Bay Head Junction?

South Amboy

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Posted by daveklepper on Monday, October 18, 2021 8:37 AM

Hints:  Two of the above PRR services shared the same engine-change point.  Thus, only four such locations, not five.

Two of the locations survived into the full electrification era.

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Posted by daveklepper on Sunday, October 17, 2021 2:53 AM

Manhattan Transfer was the engine-change location for PRR trains to and from Penn. Sta., NYC.  When the 11000V 25Hz AC electrification was extended from Trenton to Sunnyside Yard, where was the engine change point for:

Trains to Pittsburgh, Chicago, Cincinnati, and St. Louis?

Trains to Washington, DC and south?

Trains to Atlantic City?  (The Nellie Bly)?

Trains to Cape Charles?

Trains to Bay Head Junction?

Of couse, trains to Philadelphia were electric all the way and ran to the old Broad Street Station.

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Posted by rcdrye on Friday, October 15, 2021 12:16 PM

Have at it. 

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Posted by daveklepper on Friday, October 15, 2021 9:15 AM

I did not understand that i answered correctly.  If I did, I can come up with a  queation.

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Posted by Overmod on Wednesday, October 13, 2021 8:09 PM

CSSHEGEWISCH
It's getting harder to come up with questions that most people have a reasonable shot at answering.

I can't find many that are any fun, either.  I miss Mike MacDonald.

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Posted by CSSHEGEWISCH on Wednesday, October 13, 2021 10:08 AM

I'll pass.  It's getting harder to come up with questions that most people have a reasonable shot at answering.

The daily commute is part of everyday life but I get two rides a day out of it. Paul
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Posted by Overmod on Tuesday, October 12, 2021 7:58 PM

CSSHEGEWISCH
I'll supply the next question.  Erie Lackawanna 5-6, the "Lake Cities", briefly operated by another name in the mid-60's.  What was the name and the basis for the name.

You asked this already, about the World's Fair.  Ask another one.

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Posted by CSSHEGEWISCH on Tuesday, October 12, 2021 10:23 AM

I'll supply the next question.  Erie Lackawanna 5-6, the "Lake Cities", briefly operated by another name in the mid-60's.  What was the name and the basis for the name.

The daily commute is part of everyday life but I get two rides a day out of it. Paul
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Posted by Overmod on Friday, October 8, 2021 10:29 PM

daveklepper
I'm unsure if CNJ had any FP-7s, but they certainly did have Baldwin. EMD, and Alco diesels in commuter sevice at the same time.

You left out two kinds of FMs, too.

The Reading ran their FP7s over CNJ, but I don't think there were any 'native' Jersey Central painted examples... they valued runaround bidirectionality.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=t3eqnW5H2ac

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Posted by Overmod on Friday, October 8, 2021 10:11 PM

daveklepper
I'm unsure if CNJ had any FP-7s, but they certainly did have Baldwin. EMD, and Alco diesels in commuter sevice at the same time.

You left out two kinds of FMs, too.

The Reading ran their FP7s over CNJ, but I don't think there were any 'native' Jersey Central painted examples... they valued runaround bidirectionality.

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Posted by rcdrye on Friday, October 8, 2021 7:36 PM

That's what I was looking for.  SD7s also made cameo appearances.

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Posted by CSSHEGEWISCH on Friday, October 8, 2021 10:08 AM

The other railroad would be Southern Pacific.  Six-axle power came in the form of H24-66's, SD9's and SDP45's.  FP7's from SP and Cotton Belt (just one) also ran in commute service.

The daily commute is part of everyday life but I get two rides a day out of it. Paul
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Posted by rcdrye on Friday, October 8, 2021 8:24 AM

Rock Island is one, with EMC, Alco (including an EMD-re-engined DL-109) and Fairbanks-Morse.  FP7s were irregular until fairly late in the game.  The other railroad I'm looking for isn't in Chicago.  CNJ had F7s which I think were freight-only.

Milwaukee had Alco RSC-2s in service on pasenger trains in light rail territory, but Chicago commuter service was all EMD.

The other railroad I'm looking for isn't in Chicago. The "off-brand" diesels there lasted until the early 1970s, after the FP7s had been sold (FP7's were only occasional visitors).  Unlike most other commuter systems, a large percentage of the locomotives were six axle power.

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Posted by daveklepper on Friday, October 8, 2021 7:27 AM

Reading assogned FP7s to commuter trains as well as Alco RS-?.   I'm unsure if CNJ had any FP-7s, but they certanly did have Baldwin. EMD, and Alco diesels in commuter sevice at the same time.  *I think they did  have FP-7s.  Regularly used on the  Queen of the Valley, if memory is correct.

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Posted by Overmod on Friday, October 8, 2021 7:16 AM

rcdrye
PRR never assigned FP7s to commuter trains to the best of my knowledge...

Not in Pittsburgh?

If further west, Rock Island qualifies -- they even had at least one commuter locomotive that was two builders at the same time!  That would make the other the Milwaukee.

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Posted by rcdrye on Friday, October 8, 2021 6:27 AM

PRR never assigned FP7s to commuter trains to the best of my knowledge, thhough both PRR and Reading had them, as well as both Alco and Baldwin power.  New Haven had Alco, EMD and F-M power on commuter trains at various times, but no FP7s.  

The two I'm looking for are a bit further west.  Both commuter operations survive in diesel operation today.

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Posted by Overmod on Friday, October 8, 2021 5:10 AM

PRR and Reading?

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Posted by rcdrye on Thursday, October 7, 2021 7:30 PM

Maybe just as interesting it that cable operation, at least of local trains, continued even after the Brooklyn Bridge  Railway was connected to the Brookly El.  Through trains were electrically operated.

One railroad operated diesel locomotives from three different builders in commuter service, another operated diesels from two.  Both ran EMD FP7s on commuter trains from time to time, though neither assigned them regularly in the early years.  Name both of the railroads.

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Posted by daveklepper on Thursday, October 7, 2021 4:09 AM

You are the winner.  Not generally known, but at night when the cable was inspected, the steam engines, used in te day only for terminal switching, ran the service across the bridge.  And then, during the period of mixed cable and electric operation, the Brooklyn Rapid Transit had a power-house fire and a failure at a second power-house before the first was rebuilt, and some steam operation returned, including some trains running through over the bridge.

Thus, the very last steam revenue operation was as late as 1903.  The cable was shut down in 1908, ending close to 25-years of cable operation.

Your question

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Posted by rcdrye on Tuesday, October 5, 2021 5:05 PM

The New York & Brooklyn Bridge Railway was designed for cable operation over the bridge.  Small steam locomotives (ten 0-4-0Ts and two 2-4-2Ts) were used for switching at each end and to assist trains out of the stations.  The cable/steam hybrid operation began in October 1883. In 1896 an electric third rail was laid along the entire railway.  Twenty new Pullman motor cars began service in November 1896, using their motors for switching and starting but gripping the cable for the trip over the bridge.  When all of the new motors were in service the steam locomotives were retired, in late January 1897.  Cable operation continued during periods of heavier loads, with electric operation at other times, until January 1908. Rapid Transit operation on the Bridge lasted until 1944. 

Bridge cars were originally equipped with a Paine roller grip, later replaced by a grip similar to the original Hallidie grip, though much larger.

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Posted by daveklepper on Tuesday, October 5, 2021 4:09 AM

I suspect the C&NW tried when practical, most of the time, to place diesels that could display the train numbers. their own or on-hand UP and SP powerm to head westbound City trains to avoid the UP and SP having problems.

Name an operation, tracks, that for some time saw steam, electric, and cable operation every day, all on the same tracks.

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Posted by rcdrye on Monday, October 4, 2021 6:23 AM

Not all of C&NW's E8s (and no C&NW E7s) had changeable indicators, but those that did showed train numbers when leading "City" trains.  Milwaukee continued the practice, made easier since Milwaukee power (usually E9s) on "City" trains was part of a UP-MILW pool, with trains often led by UP power.  Other C&NW or Milwaukee trains just showed the engine number.  The practice ended for good around 1969 when UP and MILW began changing engines at Omaha instead of running through.

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Posted by daveklepper on Sunday, October 3, 2021 9:15 PM

Streamliner power ran through SP-UP-C&NW and then SP-UP-CMStP&P.   All "City" trains on these railroads.  So the two midwestern railroads are the C&NW and the CMStP&P, and the trains are all "City" trains to and from Chicago. 

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Posted by rcdrye on Sunday, October 3, 2021 6:44 PM

Until 1971 (and later in San Feancisco Commute territory) Both SP and UP put train numbers of passenger trains in the locomotives' indicators. Use of train numbers and "X" indications were dropped earlier for freight trains.

Two midwestern railroads also carried passenger train numbers in indicators, but not on all trains, and not at the same time.  Name the two railroads and any of the passenger trains involved.

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