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Classic Railroad Quiz (at least 50 years old).

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Posted by rcdrye on Friday, December 24, 2021 7:38 AM

Here's a softball question:  In most years, New York Central's Twentieth Century Limited operated on Christmas.  About once every six years, it took Christmas off.  What was the reason?

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Posted by rcdrye on Saturday, December 25, 2021 11:13 AM

If it's any help, it wouldn't be running today.  In years it ran it almost always ran as a single section.

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Posted by daveklepper on Sunday, December 26, 2021 3:35 AM

Nobody eished to ride that day.  (The Holiday and heightb of the Deression)

And the small edit overmod should vhave was to deletes any reference to subway use.

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Posted by rcdrye on Sunday, December 26, 2021 7:36 AM

Because of the way it worked out with leap years the Century ran every depression Christmas except 1937.

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Posted by daveklepper on Sunday, December 26, 2021 11:39 AM

If my answer was not correct, then it had to do with equip ment maintenance scheduling.  Or crew scheduling on sundays and hoklidays.

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Posted by ZephyrOverland on Sunday, December 26, 2021 9:02 PM

rcdrye

Here's a softball question:  In most years, New York Central's Twentieth Century Limited operated on Christmas.  About once every six years, it took Christmas off.  What was the reason?

 

For a number of years, the 20th Century Limited did not operate on Saturdays, especially after WW2. So, when Dec 25 fell on a Saturday, the 20th Century Limited had two reasons not to operate. Instead, the Commodore Vanderbilt would usually operate on the 20th Century's schedule, even handling the transcontinental Pullmans the latter would handle the other days of the week.

 

Happy Holidays to all.....

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Posted by daveklepper on Monday, December 27, 2021 12:26 AM

Did the practice of no 20th on Saturday continue until the Commodore Vanderbilt was discontinued?

Since you provided the only correct answer, you should ask another question.

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Posted by rcdrye on Monday, December 27, 2021 6:15 AM

ZO has the correct answer.  The practice of running daily except Saturday continued into the late 1940s at least.  The advent of the daily through Pullmans from the Super Chief may have been the changeover.  During the 1920s the Century frequently ran in multiple sections, but apparently never on Christmas.

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Posted by Overmod on Monday, December 27, 2021 6:51 AM

There's a reason I didn't make the 'small edit' -- it wouldn't be fair.

I had thought there was actual subway-equipment operation through the tunnels.  Since that ain't so, my answer shouldn't count.

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Posted by ZephyrOverland on Monday, December 27, 2021 2:31 PM

daveklepper

Did the practice of no 20th on Saturday continue until the Commodore Vanderbilt was discontinued?

Since you provided the only correct answer, you should ask another question.

 

The practice of ex-Saturday 20th Century ended when the Commodore Vanderbilt was combined with the 20th Century in April, 1958.

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Posted by ZephyrOverland on Monday, December 27, 2021 3:10 PM

rcdrye

ZO has the correct answer.  The practice of running daily except Saturday continued into the late 1940s at least.  The advent of the daily through Pullmans from the Super Chief may have been the changeover.  During the 1920s the Century frequently ran in multiple sections, but apparently never on Christmas.

 

Actually, the ex-Saturday 20th Century Limited operation was a product of the 1950's (BTW - the 20th Century did operate on Christmas Saturday, 1937, per NYC schedules and Official Guides of the time.)

The 20th Century Limited was a daily operation from its inception until June of 1953, when Saturday runs were scrubbed from July 4 to Labor Day, at which time daily operation resumed. Beginning in April 1954 through April 1958, the 20th Century consistently had no Saturday departures. Between 1954 and 1956, additional runs were scrubbed in and around holidays; sometimes only on the actual holiday, such as July 4 and Labor Day, but in November and December the Century did not run for a number of days around the Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Years holidays. This time period of no-Saturday Centuries coinsided with financial difficuties NYC was having at the time - the railroad was trying to save money any way it can without signaling to the public the problems it was having.

As for the Commodore Vanderbilt, the Saturday schedule change (when the Century was not operating) was the exception rather than the rule - the Commodore was operated on the Century's schedule on Saturdays only during the summer of 1954. There was another short time period where the Commodore operated on a schedule closer to - but not mimicing - the Century's. Otherwise the Commodore was a daily train and remained on its own schedule.

In April 1958, the 20th Century Limited resumed its daily operation (and would remain so until its discontinuance), but running "combined" with the Commodore Vanderbilt, the latter becoming a train on paper only until October 1960, when the name was dropped from NYC timetables.

A new question will be forthcoming in a few days.....

Happy New Year all.......

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Posted by daveklepper on Monday, January 10, 2022 10:53 AM

Waiting

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Posted by ZephyrOverland on Thursday, January 13, 2022 7:16 PM

daveklepper

Waiting

 

we all are....

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Posted by ZephyrOverland on Thursday, January 13, 2022 7:16 PM

Up to a decade before WW2, you were able to ride this Canadian transcontinental. After WW2 you were able to ride a western transcontinental with the same name.

The name and the routes, please...

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Posted by rcdrye on Saturday, January 15, 2022 4:58 PM

Don't have the CP train numbers (yet).

Imperial (or Imperial Limited) Canadian Pacific Montreal-Vancouver

discontined around 1931.  CPR's Dominion and later Canadian operated on the same route.

 

CRI&P/SP Imperial 39/40 Chicago-Los Angeles.  The name was first used on a local Yuma-LA train but it became the secondary train on the Golden State route after WWII. Routed through California's Imperial Valley, it also carried a San Diego Sleeper for at least a few years after WWII.  It remained mainly as a mail and express train into the 1960s.

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Posted by ZephyrOverland on Sunday, January 16, 2022 11:13 AM

rcdrye

Don't have the CP train numbers (yet).

Imperial (or Imperial Limited) Canadian Pacific Montreal-Vancouver

discontined around 1931.  CPR's Dominion and later Canadian operated on the same route.

 

CRI&P/SP Imperial 39/40 Chicago-Los Angeles.  The name was first used on a local Yuma-LA train but it became the secondary train on the Golden State route after WWII. Routed through California's Imperial Valley, it also carried a San Diego Sleeper for at least a few years after WWII.  It remained mainly as a mail and express train into the 1960s.

 

Yes, The Imperial was the name I was looking for. CP's version (as the Imperial Limited) began in 1899 as a seasonal operation, becoming year-round in 1911. The "Limited" designation was dropped in 1929, and the train itself was discontinued in 1933.

Your description of the RI/SP Imperial was correct, as their Imperial was secondary to the Golden State Limited. Other Golden State Route trains that filled this role at one time or another include: Californian, Apache, Southwest Express, Chicago Special, California Special, California Fast Mail, and Chicago Fast Mail.

Rcdrye, you have the next question...

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Posted by rcdrye on Sunday, January 16, 2022 12:05 PM

How about a similar question.  These two trains shared the same name, one in Canada connecting two major seaports, the other connecting three Gulf Coast ports.  The name of a cuisine common in the region of the second train is a corruption of the word used in the trains' name.

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Posted by Backshop on Sunday, January 16, 2022 7:46 PM

The SP Acadian connected New Orleans to Houston via Beaumont. The CN Acadian connected Montreal and Halifax. The food is Cajun. 

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Posted by rcdrye on Monday, January 17, 2022 9:06 AM

Well Done!  Of course the CN also served Quebec City, a minor seaport, via ferry from Levis across the river.  There was also a Boston connection - the Pine Tree Acadian - using the Gull B&M/MEC/CP route to St. John NB.

Texas & New Orleans (SP) had lots of secondary trains, many with Pullman service, connecting points all over Texas until after World War II.  Most T&NO routes were discontinued between 1950 and 1955, leaving only the Sunset Limited and Argonaut in the 1960s.  Many of T&NO's passenger GP9s served only a couple of years in that role before they were either sent to freight service or to parent SP's San Francisco Commute pool.

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