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NYC subways MOW work.

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Posted by daveklepper on Tuesday, December 20, 2022 2:09 PM

Something very similar is the freight railroads' slab-track, very common for tunnels.

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Posted by G Mack on Tuesday, December 13, 2022 5:43 PM

I thank you all for the replies. I have never heard of Direct Fixation Track. And at fifty years, wow! That is along time but, I suppose since it doesn't see heavy freight traffic it would last much longer. My home is in Indianapolis and we don't have a rail system like NYC, unfortunately. So, I am fascinated by the NYC subways, New Jesey Transit, Metro North, and Long Island Railroad systems of NYC area.

Gregory

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Posted by daveklepper on Tuesday, December 13, 2022 11:13 AM

Direct Fixation track, as it is called, requires replsacement after about 50 years, not sooner.  Everything is removed to the tunnel floor, and a complete new track structure is installed.  Depending on the length being repaired, this csn be a weekend 10pm Friday - 5am Monday job or up-to-a-month out-of-service.  In any case, there is also  prerparatory work and finishing work 11pm-5am weekdays. 

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Posted by BaltACD on Monday, December 12, 2022 8:38 PM

MidlandMike
I remember seeing that the underground subway track ties were set partly in cement, and the ties were not the typical RR tie that spans the two rails, but instead there was a small separate tie under each rail, with a gutter like channel between the two tie pairs.  The ties were about 1/3rd the length of a regular tie, so tunnel width constraints should not have been the problem.  However, I seem to remember the above ground ties were full width.

This article has a photo showing the ties at an NYCT underground station.

 https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2016/aug/31/new-york-city-subway-trains-noise-pollution-jet-engine

Never too old to have a happy childhood!

              

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Posted by MidlandMike on Monday, December 12, 2022 8:15 PM

I remember seeing that the underground subway track ties were set partly in cement, and the ties were not the typical RR tie that spans the two rails, but instead there was a small separate tie under each rail, with a gutter like channel between the two tie pairs.  The ties were about 1/3rd the length of a regular tie, so tunnel width constraints should not have been the problem.  However, I seem to remember the above ground ties were full width.

This article has a photo showing the ties at an NYCT underground station.

 https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2016/aug/31/new-york-city-subway-trains-noise-pollution-jet-engine

 

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Posted by G Mack on Monday, December 12, 2022 3:39 PM

I thank Mr. Klepper for his reply to my question, but this wasn't what I was looking for. How do the M.O.W. forces actually do the work? For example, how do they remove and replace a cross tie down in the tunnels where there is no side-to-side clearance to get the tie out or on elevated track where they must negoiate switches, walkways, third rail anchor points, and other such infrastructure? To me it seems you would have to disassemble a lot of things just to so a simple task, such as replace a cross tie, a switch point, or section of rail. I have not ever seen videos of the M.O.W. doing such work, but I think it would be fascinating to see.

Gregory

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Posted by daveklepper on Tuesday, September 20, 2022 11:17 AM

Some of the information you want is already posted on the Restoration in the New York Area thread on this Forum, but to answer directly:

Specific sectiuons  of track may removed from service, in some cases aropound the clock, but more often noights 11pm - 5am plus weekends, for periods of weeks or even two months.

When three or four tracks are available, usiallu one track is  out oif service.  No express service with all trains making local stops.  Or no local service in one direction, with some passengers needing to neediung to reverse direction.

When there are only two tracks, in one or both directionsm trains  may be rerouted.  The A and C are currently running via the F between West 4th Street and Jay street during nights and weekends.

In some cases, shuttle busses are uased.

By all means visit the subwayb system's websight for a complete picture.

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NYC subways MOW work.
Posted by G Mack on Tuesday, September 20, 2022 9:00 AM

Greetings,

I have been watching videos of the NYC subways on YouTube, especially Welcome To An Experience and David Limes videos, they are excellent. When watching these, I often wonder how the MOW workers get track work done. It seems to me, that in many areas the job of replacing cross ties, switches, and track would be a tremendous job given all the infrastructure and the limited access. Anyone know how this is done? Are there any videos out there that may show the MOW work on the subway lines? 

Gregory

 

 

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