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Another gasoline truck fire closes I -95 again.

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Another gasoline truck fire closes I -95 again.
Posted by blue streak 1 on Friday, May 3, 2024 6:23 PM
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Posted by BaltACD on Saturday, May 4, 2024 4:57 PM

And we see/pass these BOMB trucks almost every day in our travels and in relative terms don't think twice about it.

Never too old to have a happy childhood!

              

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Posted by Erik_Mag on Friday, May 10, 2024 11:28 PM

California learned the hard way about gasoline tanker trucks and tunnels being a bad match back in 1978. What got me was that members of the Sacramento press thouht that an Assemblyman's proposal to ban tankers from tunnels was purely a political move - which doesn't reeflect well on the press.

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Posted by BaltACD on Saturday, May 11, 2024 1:51 PM

Erik_Mag
California learned the hard way about gasoline tanker trucks and tunnels being a bad match back in 1978. What got me was that members of the Sacramento press thouht that an Assemblyman's proposal to ban tankers from tunnels was purely a political move - which doesn't reeflect well on the press.

Bulk fuel trucks are prohibited through both the Fort McHenry Tunnel and the Baltimore Harbor Tunnel.  The 'short cut' for these types of cargos used to be the Francis Scott Key Bridge and using the East side of the Baltimore Beltway (I-695); with the bridge being destroyed these cargo's must utilize the longer West side of the the Baltimore Beltway.  Bulk fuel cargos have been prohibited from these tunnells from the day they opened.  Baltimore Harbor Tunnel opened for traffic in 1957.

Never too old to have a happy childhood!

              

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Posted by Erik_Mag on Saturday, May 11, 2024 8:20 PM

Prohibiting bulk fuel transoprt through tunnels makes perfect sense, just surprised that the state of California didn't have similar restrictions. One difference is that the Caldecott tunnels are on a grade, so the lowest point is a portal and not the middle as in the case of the Baltimore tunnels. I wonder about Nevada as there are a couple of tunnels on I-80 next to the SP and WP tunnels along the Humboldt river.

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Posted by MidlandMike on Saturday, May 11, 2024 8:37 PM

Don't know about Nevada, but in Colorado where I-70 goes under the continental divide thru the Eisenhower Tunnel at about 11,000' elevation, hazardous tankers must go over Loveland Pass at 12,000' summit.

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