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Handicapped Activist Law-Suits Settled and 95% of New York Subway Stations Accessable end of 2055

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Handicapped Activist Law-Suits Settled and 95% of New York Subway Stations Accessable end of 2055
Posted by daveklepper on Saturday, June 25, 2022 1:35 PM

All the details were in the computer before Friday night and now are missing.  And now I'm having problems in using the NYMTA website.  But you should have no problem, and perhaps you can post the details.   Thanks.

The settlement was an historic and important event.

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Posted by Overmod on Saturday, June 25, 2022 3:50 PM
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Posted by daveklepper on Sunday, June 26, 2022 8:04 AM

THANKS!!!

Very good work

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Posted by Overmod on Sunday, June 26, 2022 8:16 AM

I don't think MTA had worked out a full face-saving version of their position when I was finding references yesterday.  It will be interesting to see what they produce.

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Posted by BEAUSABRE on Sunday, June 26, 2022 8:24 PM

Gee, I'm so relieved! Only 33 years, a third of a century, an entire generation, before it's complete!! 

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Posted by daveklepper on Wednesday, June 29, 2022 2:15 AM

Check  the websikte for stations elready :"accessable."

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Posted by daveklepper on Thursday, February 23, 2023 3:22 PM

More accessabiliy:

 

February 23, 2023
MTA Announces 29 New Elevators Will Be Installed at Subway Stations Across All Five Boroughs
Accessibility Upgrades at 17 Subway Stations
 
·         Van Cortlandt Park-242 St 
·         Harlem-148 St 
·         96 St 
·         81 St 
·         86 St 
·         46 St-Bliss St 
·         33 St-Rawson 
·         Broadway 
·         Court Sq-23 St 
·         New Lots Av 
·         Classon Av 
·         36 St 
·         Huguenot SIR
·         168 St 
·         Broadway Junction (3 stations)
o    Broadway Junction 
o    Broadway Junction 
Broadway Junction
 
As construction continues at previously awarded stations, the MTA also projects that accessibility upgrades will open at 12 new stations in 2023. These stations are:
·  Dyckman St  (NB)
·  Tremont Av 
·  181 St 
·  E 149 St 
·  Court Square 
·  Lorimer St 
·  Grand St 
·  Metropolitan Av 
·  7 Av 
·  New Dorp SIR
·  8 Av  (SB)
 

 

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Posted by BaltACD on Saturday, February 25, 2023 5:49 PM

daveklepper
All the details were in the computer before Friday night and now are missing.  And now I'm having problems in using the NYMTA website.  But you should have no problem, and perhaps you can post the details.   Thanks.

The settlement was an historic and important event.

A 'settlement date' that is still 32 years in the future?  Nothing to brag about.

Never too old to have a happy childhood!

              

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Posted by CSSHEGEWISCH on Sunday, February 26, 2023 9:52 AM

When you consider the number of stations involved and the fact that a fair number of stations are substantially above ground level, 32 years may be long but not that much of a stretch.

The daily commute is part of everyday life but I get two rides a day out of it. Paul
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Posted by BaltACD on Sunday, February 26, 2023 11:07 AM

CSSHEGEWISCH
When you consider the number of stations involved and the fact that a fair number of stations are substantially above ground level, 32 years may be long but not that much of a stretch.

But it is a near guarantee that a person in need of the handicapped accessability today will likely be in the ground before 2055.  2025 or event 2035 would be something different.

Never too old to have a happy childhood!

              

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Posted by daveklepper on Thursday, March 2, 2023 8:47 AM

More than half of the subway stations should be handicapped-accessable by 2030, with the hard and expensive work at the most difficult and least-used stations taking longer.  My own opinion is that they are doing a good job, considering the age of most of the system and other demands on finances and logistics.

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Posted by BaltACD on Sunday, March 5, 2023 10:43 PM

daveklepper
More than half of the subway stations should be handicapped-accessable by 2030, with the hard and expensive work at the most difficult and least-used stations taking longer.  My own opinion is that they are doing a good job, considering the age of most of the system and other demands on finances and logistics.

How many handicapped individuals will die before their station becomes accessable to them?  2055 is still a long ways off for handicapped that have yet to be born.  

Feature that MTA's real thinking is that there won't be any handicapped to use the stations by 2055, so no one then will care.  

Never too old to have a happy childhood!

              

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Posted by daveklepper on Tuesday, March 7, 2023 2:06 PM

All NYCity transit buses are ADA-compliasnt, and with universal trasnsfer privileges, connectingv to a station that is accesable shouild not be a problem.  Buses can also take you anywhere in the city.

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Posted by BEAUSABRE on Friday, March 17, 2023 3:24 PM

OK, but I think you are missing the point. This ain't BUSSES Magazine

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Posted by BEAUSABRE on Friday, March 17, 2023 3:34 PM

If "take the bus" is the answer, then let's scrap the subway and replace it with busses

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Posted by daveklepper on Wednesday, March 22, 2023 3:40 PM

In NYCIty, it is one integrated system, and both modes are essential.

And, as I pointed out, it's temporarily part of the answer.

I'd be interested cin knowing if Chicago and/or Philadelphia are doing any better regarding handicapped access to older rapid-transit lines.   Comment?  

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Posted by CSSHEGEWISCH on Thursday, March 23, 2023 10:00 AM

The Chicago Transit Authority is in pretty good shape regarding handicapped access.  Most if not all stations on the "L" have elevators between ground and station level.

The daily commute is part of everyday life but I get two rides a day out of it. Paul
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Posted by BEAUSABRE on Thursday, March 23, 2023 8:30 PM

"Temporary" for a THIRD OF A CENTURY....You have to laugh. There may not be a subway system in the 2050's

From Bloomberg is a comparison of ridership figures 2023 compared to 2019 of some of the stations with heaviest passenger load. 

Times Square - 36 percent

Grand Central - 33 percent

Harold Square - 31 percent

Union Square - 33 percent

The riders have left and they ain't comin' back

Implications -

1) There is a hole of at least 60 percent in MTA's projected revenues from fares. Neither the city or the state has the funds to cover it as they have their own problems

2 That means MTA will have to reduce expenses

a) Cut employees across the board, operations, maintenance and security included

b) That means less trains with fewer operating personnel and more cars deadlined for parts which can't be ordered as the budget is shot

c) That means dirtier stations with more lights out, overflowing trash bins, etc

d) That means fewer police on a system that many New Yorkers already think is unsafe. They use Uber and Lyft instead if they can afford it. Only the poor and desperate ride the trains

e) There are no funds for preventive maintenance, let alone impprovements

The upshot is the system goes into a death spiral as fewer passengers ride the trains (who wants to wait around for long periods in dirty, badly policed stations for dirty, badly policed, poorly maintained trains?), which cuts revenue, which leads to further cuts by the MTA, which drives away more passengers

Sorry, for the bad news, Dave, but ya gotta face reality. New Yorkers are voting with their feet

 

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Posted by daveklepper on Friday, March 24, 2023 3:36 AM

Please visit the MTA website and check your ridership figures against their's.

Who is right?

I think you are nuts if you think that the State Legislature, City Council. Mayor, Borough Presidents, Governor, and the population' majority, would be anything but committed to retention and further improvement of the subway system.

And if you think you can do a better job of obtaining funds and how to allocate what's obtained, with better handicapped-access being only one of several needed improvements, by all means apply to the MTA for a job in transportation planning. 

The only time I had deep and heartfelt criticism was their very detailed planning for 14th-Street-Canarsie (L-Line) closure.  And those plans went into the wastebasket, and a far-better approach to the problem was effected.

From what I recall from their lazgtest figures, and I probably shoul,d haveSub posted them, and will when the next batch arrives, overall ridership of the Subway System is now at 80% pre-pandemic levels. 

I'd appreciate learning the actuakl extent of Station ADA compliance for the CTA and the program toward 100%.

 

  

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Posted by NittanyLion on Tuesday, March 28, 2023 12:17 PM

BEAUSABRE

If "take the bus" is the answer, then let's scrap the subway and replace it with busses

 

DC Metro, which has been fully accessible from opening day, still has to do this to cover elevator outages.  There's no workaround without resorting to the unlikely or impossible (I can't imagine how long a spiral ramp would be to get to some of the deeper stations).

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Posted by daveklepper on Wednesday, April 26, 2023 2:12 AM
April 24, 2023
Some editing.  Several speeces omitted.
 
 

MTA Announces Policy Permitting Personal Electric Vehicles on Subways, Buses and Commuter Railroads, Fulfilling a Goal of Micromobility Strategic Action Plan

 
Agency Outlines Safety Guidelines for Personal Electric Vehicles on Mass Transit

Charging and/or Riding Electric Vehicles Within MTA Facilities or On Board MTA Vehicles is Prohibited

The Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) today adopted a policy that allows the transport of personal electric vehicles (PEV) on MTA property and on board transit, with the exception of MTA express buses, and outlined the rules for safe transport. This policy supports New York State’s and New York City’s micromobility programs encouraging the use of personal vehicles such as bikes and scooters, particularly for first and last mile transportation, enhancing the transit experience by supporting multi-modal journeys and providing seamless integration. The policy will increase access to MTA transit by for people who do not live within walking distance from a transit station and fulfills one of the short-term goals established by the Extending Transit’s Reach, the MTA’s landmark Bicycle, Pedestrian, and Micromobility Strategic Action Plan issued in January. 

“Safety is the MTA’s priority,” said MTA Chief Safety & Security Officer Patrick Warren. “This policy safely introduces a way for passengers to bring personal electric vehicles on board transit while supporting the rise in micromobility and accessibility to transit.” 

“An accessible transit system that is reachable and convenient to use benefits all New Yorkers,” said NYC Transit President Richard Davey. “System accessibility is essential for all MTA riders and this policy allows riders in less well served areas to better connect with the transit system in a safe manner.”

“Today’s announcement of the new overarching policy regarding the use of e-bikes and e-scooters in stations and on board subways, trains and buses is very welcome,” said Executive Director of the Permanent Citizens Advisory Committee to the MTA (PCAC) Lisa Daglian.

The rules apply to all customers, MTA employees, contractors, consultants, andetc. For bike regulations, see here.
  • Charging of PEVs in or on any MTA train, subway, bus, platform, station, facility, or terminal is prohibited
  • Walk with it, don’t ride it
  • If the PEV can be folded, it must be folded, or compacted and carried, except for on MTA express buses. Any form of PEVs, including foldable permissible PEVs, are prohibited inside MTA express buses.
  • PEVs must remain powered off during transport
  • Doors, seats, aisles and emergency equipment must be kept clear
  • PEVs and their batteries must never be left unattended, discarded, stored, locked to any MTA asset within the system, or abandoned for any reason
  • Cannot exceed 100 pounds in weight
  • Must have a wheel diameter not exceeding 27 inches nor be more than 80 inches long or 48 inches high
  • Hoverboards are not permitted in the system
  • Must use batteries that are Underwriter Laboratory (UL) certified and listed
  • Must not emit environmental contaminants
  • Must not have damaged batteries
  • Property of a shared or rented PEV provider (e.g., Citi Bike, Lime, Bird, Lynx, etc.) into the system is not allowed
These rules go beyond the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). MTA employees and customers should always give priority to people with disabilities.

Read more here.
 



 

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Posted by Overmod on Wednesday, April 26, 2023 4:46 AM

Here is the MTA's list of rules:

https://new.mta.info/safety-and-security/personal-electric-vehicle-policy?auHash=RnyjUTDCo3RkN3N7NrcT65eUVx3NAhw4CffrHb6uNUM

It appears to me that a number of currently-popular scooter-type devices will be difficult if not impossible to use in both subways and buses: it would be interesting to see 'personal mobility equipment' that can be folded as MTA expects, or that a disabled person can carry through stations, or that fits existing racks and storage.

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Posted by daveklepper on Wednesday, February 28, 2024 7:17 AM
The Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) today announced that
the Tremont Av  subway station in the Bronx is now fully accessible to
all in accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). The
project included the installation of three new elevators, with one
taking customers from the street to the mezzanine, and two taking
customers from the mezzanine to the platform, as well as two
reconstructed and relocated staircases and new ADA platform edges.

The installed elevators include a new fire alarm system, smoke and
heat detectors and cameras inside the elevator cabs, all to enhance
customer safety. Each elevator is also equipped with an emergency
two-way communication system which gives riders the ability to
communicate with dispatchers in the event of an emergency via standard
voice communications or visually by answering on-screen questions,
which greatly improves communication for riders with hearing or speech
disabilities.

“With these upgrades at Tremont Av  there are now 149 fully accessible
stations across the subway system,” said MTA Chair and CEO Janno
Lieber.“That means tangible quality-of-life improvements for customers
with disabilities, parents with strollers, and all kinds of other
folks. Across the MTA we’ve already opened five newly accessible
stations this year, and we intend to continue pushing the pace
throughout 2024.”

“Newly accessible stations like Tremont Av  are the fruits of our
efforts to execute projects more efficiently through innovative
delivery methods like project bundling,” said MTA Construction &
Development President Jamie Torres-Springer. “We are completing ADA
upgrades in record time, which will greatly improve accessibility not
just in the Bronx but throughout our transit system.”

“Our top priority is creating a transit system that’s accessible for
everyone,” said MTA Chief Accessibility Officer Quemuel Arroyo. “The
new elevators at Tremont Av , along with the other accessibility
upgrades installed, will increase transit access for thousands of
Tremont residents. I’m excited to see even more stations become
accessible in 2024.”

“Public transportation is equity,” said MTA Chief Customer Officer
Shanifah Rieara. “In Tremont, a community that is often overlooked and
underserved, it is amazing to bring these new accessibility resources
to this neighborhood. Thank you to all the hardworking crews for
making this possible for Bronxites today and beyond.”

“The speed at which we’re upgrading stations like Tremont Av  is a
testament to how dedicated transit crews are to creating a fully
accessible subway system,” said New York City Transit President
Richard Davey. “We’re only just getting started – there are 12 more
stations set to receive accessibility upgrades by the end of this
year.”

The Tremont Av  station ADA upgrades are part of an ADA improvement
package of three subway stations, which also includes 149 St–Grand
Concourse . This package is one of several that MTA C&D is delivering
better, faster, and cheaper through innovative contracting tools such
as design-build and project bundling.
 
 
 
 
 
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