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Locomotive Paint Schemes

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Posted by kgbw49 on Friday, October 30, 2020 9:06 AM

Good point!

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Posted by CMStPnP on Saturday, October 31, 2020 11:35 AM

Lithonia Operator

I believe Berkshire Hathaway is a public holding company. But a single share will run you over $300K at the moment, if you can find one. (I don't know how often anyone sells.) BH, I found, does own 100% of BNSF. And a ton of other companies!

Not exactly true.  I manage a portfolio as a trustee and I have bought a lot of BH stock because it is a no brainer for the long-term growth rates.    BH has different classes of stock and currently the stock I hold sells for $201.90 a share, symbol is BRKB.   It is designed specifically for public participation in BH.......and by a stretch BNSF railway.

As for paint schemes the Eastern Railroads do not have the long distances and miles between washings as the Western Railroads do.    My vote is for NS as maintaining the cleanest paint and shiniest locomotives.   Second place would go to KCS.

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Posted by kenny dorham on Sunday, November 1, 2020 11:13 PM

I lived in usa, ca 94585. Now i live usa, ca, 95624.

Both have lots of rail traffic. My current location in Elk Grove, the train goes right through our little downtown. We actually have warning signals and arms on Main Street.....so cars have to stop for the trains..... MOST of the rail traffic is later in the day, but big trains do come through town every day from 6AM to 6PM.

Anyway....... what i seem to see is (mostly) UP power that looks like it was painted when new and then never touched again. It SEEMS like the BNSF locos are "cleaner" but i see a lot less of them. I imagine there is no real need to worry about the paint unless it presents some type of Safety/Mechanical/Performance issue.

What is the life-span of your "average" diesel loco these days.?

Thank You

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Posted by caldreamer on Monday, November 2, 2020 7:51 AM

I think the life span of a locomotive is about 20 years or so, then they are rebuilt.  Examples include the SD60/60M, C44-9W and SD8043MAC'S.  If they are not worth rebuilding they are sold or scrapped.

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Posted by BaltACD on Monday, November 2, 2020 9:23 AM

Under PSR I don't know how much $$$$$$ 'pretty' adds to the bottom line.

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Posted by kenny dorham on Tuesday, November 3, 2020 10:59 AM

caldreamer

I think the life span of a locomotive is about 20 years or so, then they are rebuilt.  Examples include the SD60/60M, C44-9W and SD8043MAC'S.  If they are not worth rebuilding they are sold or scrapped.

 

10-4..... thank you Smile

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Posted by BaltACD on Tuesday, November 3, 2020 1:15 PM

caldreamer
I think the life span of a locomotive is about 20 years or so, then they are rebuilt.  Examples include the SD60/60M, C44-9W and SD8043MAC'S.  If they are not worth rebuilding they are sold or scrapped.

The original high horsepower AC locomotives are now approaching 25 years in service - thus they are currently undergoing the various rebuilding projects on the various carriers.

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Posted by zugmann on Tuesday, November 3, 2020 8:04 PM

BaltACD
thus they are currently undergoing the various rebuilding projects on the various carriers.

New air freshener in the bathroom. 

   The opinions expressed here represent my own and not those of my employer or any other railroad, company, or person.

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Posted by BaltACD on Tuesday, November 3, 2020 9:30 PM

zugmann
 
BaltACD
thus they are currently undergoing the various rebuilding projects on the various carriers. 

New air freshener in the bathroom. 

NS effort to lower the OR!  Isn't the air freshener good for another 100 tons on the tonnage rating?

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Posted by samfp1943 on Thursday, November 5, 2020 10:05 AM

Flintlock76

I don't think I've ever seen either a photo of a BNSF locomotive, or one of the rare run-throughs we get around here, where the unit looked like a slum on wheels.  

But of course, it's Mr. Buffett's railroad, he doesn't answer to Wall Street bottom-liners.  Hey, he could have crews Simonizing his locomotives after runs and there's no-one to tell him he can't!  

  

        Warren Buffet is the entity 'controling' Berkshire-Hathaway,essenially a  'stockholder's'  corporation. So being, the controling owner, it might be 'extrapolated' that BNSF is 'His' railroad?  Captain

     As to the 'slums on wheels' comment... Living here on what coud be termed the middle of the BNSF Southern T-con; we are treated to, at times, appaear to be some pretty 'scruffy lookig power'Sigh

Generally, not too much 'graffiti' on the individual locomotives, but what at times, there seems to be 'a lot' of scorched paint, and some that looks to have been, way beyond the 'scorched' paint on the long hoods.

  Just as a casual observation, those G.E.'s seem to have a propensity for turbo's getting really hot, and causing fires that damage paint on the long hoods(?)  Some of them look pretty ugly, goin by.  Whistling

 

 


 

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Posted by wjstix on Tuesday, November 10, 2020 2:57 PM

Re cleaning...I think this was touched upon earlier, but there's a lot more involved in cleaning an engine now than in the past. Putting a diesel through a "power wash" may clean dirt off the engine, but it also can have oil, grease, etc. in the water runoff. Back when few people cared about pollution, the oily water just soaked into the ground. Now, environmental laws and regulations mean you have to collect the runoff water and treat it or dispose of it in such a way that it doesn't hurt the environment. Easier just to not wash the engines.

Stix
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Posted by zugmann on Thursday, November 12, 2020 2:17 PM

wjstix
Putting a diesel through a "power wash" may clean dirt off the engine, but it also can have oil, grease, etc. in the water runoff. Back when few people cared about pollution, the oily water just soaked into the ground. Now, environmental laws and regulations mean you have to collect the runoff water and treat it or dispose of it in such a way that it doesn't hurt the environment. Easier just to not wash the engines.

Many engine terminals have dedicated washing facilities.  They still get used occasionally - esp when an engine is shopped because it's covered in lube oil. 

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Thursday, November 12, 2020 4:11 PM

Back in the steam days locomotives were run through the wash racks before shopping, on the big 'roads at least, as a clean locomotive was easier to work on.  Is this still the procedure? 

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Posted by zugmann on Thursday, November 12, 2020 4:13 PM

Flintlock76
Back in the steam days locomotives were run through the wash racks before shopping, on the big 'roads at least, as a clean locomotive was easier to work on.  Is this still the procedure? 

Not anymore it seems.  The insides are a lot cleanner with the COVID stuff, but hte outsides aren't. 

   The opinions expressed here represent my own and not those of my employer or any other railroad, company, or person.

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Posted by BaltACD on Thursday, November 12, 2020 5:42 PM

zugmann
 

 

Flintlock76
Back in the steam days locomotives were run through the wash racks before shopping, on the big 'roads at least, as a clean locomotive was easier to work on.  Is this still the procedure?  

 

Not anymore it seems.  The insides are a lot cleanner with the COVID stuff, but hte outsides aren't. 

Cleanliness may be next to Godliness, but it doesn't increase the bottom line in PSR.

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Posted by theodorefisk on Tuesday, November 24, 2020 9:15 AM
millions of dollars were wasted in the effort to merge the two railroads and the paint scheme was revolting.
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Posted by kgbw49 on Tuesday, November 24, 2020 6:01 PM

Hey, if the Rat Patrol could function so effectively covered in a coating of grimy sand, I don't see why a diesel locomotive can't work as well with a little grime!

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Posted by BaltACD on Tuesday, November 24, 2020 8:45 PM

kgbw49
Hey, if the Rat Patrol could function so effectively covered in a coating of grimy sand, I don't see why a diesel locomotive can't work as well with a little grime!

That is the PSR view of cosmetics.

No matter how faded paint is - as long as rust is not poking through the paint - the paint is doing its job.

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