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EMD Locomotives -- 'Trade In' Division

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EMD Locomotives -- 'Trade In' Division
Posted by sswcharlie on Monday, June 27, 2022 9:17 PM

Hi

Where can I locate archives re the locomotives that EMD traded in during the 1960s ? Including non EMD products on GPs and SDs.

Thankyou

Charles Harris

Tags: Diesel , Ingalls , switcher
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Posted by BEAUSABRE on Tuesday, June 28, 2022 3:58 AM

I would think back issues of Extra 2200 South (aka X2200S), "The Locomotive News Magazine" would be your best bet. Unfortunately, I'm not aware of an on-line archive. But the  Kalmbach Library ought to have it, try contacting them. "The Kalmbach Memorial Library has been the research library of the National Model Railroad Association, and this will continue as we merge with CSRM. CSRM will  provide research and photocopy services for your convenience." 

The Kalmbach Memorial Library | National Model Railroad Association (nmra.org)

 

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Posted by CSSHEGEWISCH on Tuesday, June 28, 2022 10:10 AM

When I consider the number of locomotives I saw on Pielet's scrap line on just one day in April 1969, the number of trade-ins is going to be huge and tracking down the paperwork involved, assuming it still exists, may be well nigh impossible.  That being said, attempting to assemble this data in one place is a worthy goal.

The daily commute is part of everyday life but I get two rides a day out of it. Paul
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Posted by BEAUSABRE on Tuesday, June 28, 2022 12:10 PM

Each issue of X2200S had long lists of locomotive transactions - down to the serial number. In many cases the lists of new locomotives included the units traded in for them. I'm not saying it would be complete but baring the miraculous discovery of a complete official EMD list it's probably the best starting point available.

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Posted by Backshop on Tuesday, June 28, 2022 12:19 PM

BEAUSABRE

Each issue of X2200S had long lists of locomotive transactions - down to the serial number. In many cases the lists of new locomotives included the units traded in for them. I'm not saying it would be complete but baring the miraculous discovery of a complete official EMD list it's probably the best starting point available.

 

X2200S used to be my "bible".  I'm glad that I weaned myself off of keeping track of locomotive numbers before they went bellyup.

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Posted by bogie_engineer on Tuesday, June 28, 2022 3:02 PM

I don't know if this is of help, but you can identify whether an EMD order included trade-ins by the third digit starting with the 6-digit orders which I believe started in the early 70's or perhaps before. For the 6 digit order numbers the first two denote the year the order was first worked on and the third digit for locomotive US orders is a 6 if it's new and 7 if it's an LRO (Locomotive Rebuild Order). 8 denotes and export order. Starting in 2000, order numbers went to 8 digits with the first 4 being the year.

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Posted by BaltACD on Tuesday, June 28, 2022 6:02 PM

bogie_engineer
I don't know if this is of help, but you can identify whether an EMD order included trade-ins by the third digit starting with the 6-digit orders which I believe started in the early 70's or perhaps before. For the 6 digit order numbers the first two denote the year the order was first worked on and the third digit for locomotive US orders is a 6 if it's new and 7 if it's an LRO (Locomotive Rebuild Order). 8 denotes and export order. Starting in 2000, order numbers went to 8 digits with the first 4 being the year.

Y2K

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Posted by BEAUSABRE on Wednesday, June 29, 2022 12:48 AM

Backshop
I'm glad that I weaned myself off of keeping track of locomotive numbers before they went bellyup.

Yes,  it ended up as being the American version of "trainspotting" which is why I let my subscription lapse. Modeling the transition era in the East, I had no interest in the serial numbers of BN's latest order of GE's. In the early days they had complete rosters of transition era line's motive power and had more or less in depth articles on locomotive models that occasionally contributed to the general knowledge of dieselization (and certainly broadened my personal knowledge). Case in point, we went from calling all of Alco's early 539 powered A1A-A1A's "DL109's" to knowing that what we thought was one model were actually the DL103b (and powered by 538's!), DL105's, DL107's, DL108's, DL109's and DL110's 

"The ALCO DL-109 was one of six models of A1A-A1A Diesel locomotives built to haul passenger trains by the American Locomotive Company (ALCO) between December, 1939 and April, 1945 ("DL" stands for Diesel Locomotive). They were of a cab unit design, and both cab-equipped lead A units DL-103b, DL-105, DL-107, DL-109 and cabless booster B units DL-108, DL-110 models were buiit."

X2200S also instituted the idea of "phases" within models and laid out what distinguished one from another. 

 

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