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Rail Fanning and Preservation- Amusement and Theme Parks and Their Trains

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Posted by pennytrains on Wednesday, October 5, 2022 2:52 PM

I found 3 grainy photos of C. P. & L. E. operations from the 1988 to 1991 time frame.

https://link.shutterfly.com/uBnqzDCZStb

2-6-0 #3 "Albert" is retired and sits by the "old" mainline station platform near Millennium Force. You can also see loco #22 "Myron H." and I think the "Judy K." on the engine house leads.  The big red building in the background is the Cedars Hotel turned employee dormitory.  If you look just beyond the pole on the right side of that photo you can see the big pile of coal.

More on these locomotives: https://cplerr.weebly.com/locomotive-navigation.html

 

Big Smile  Same me, different spelling!  Big Smile

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Posted by CSSHEGEWISCH on Tuesday, October 4, 2022 12:06 PM

The cable may be analogous to the chain that pulls the coaster up the first grade (with all sorts of clicking and whirring) before that hair-raising first drop.

The daily commute is part of everyday life but I get two rides a day out of it. Paul
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Posted by wjstix on Tuesday, October 4, 2022 11:37 AM

CSSHEGEWISCH
 
wjstix

I'd argue - since I'm old and argumentative - that a roller coaster wouldn't count as riding a train, since it's not self-powered.

 

 

 
Based on that definition, riding the cable cars in San Francisco wouldn't count, either.
 

My thinking here was that most roller-coasters, at least 'traditional' ones, are coasters... i.e. they make their journey coasting downhill, using gravity as the only power. Since cables cars move on their own up and down hills via under-the-track cables they access, I would think they'd qualify as being 'powered' vehicles.

Stix
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Posted by NKP guy on Friday, September 30, 2022 8:19 AM

54light15
Don't the locals call it "Frisco?" 

54light15, I know you're kidding.  Actually, in California it's known simply as "the City."  

Among the Argonauts, calling the City "Frisco" will earn you a correction that's always embarrassing.

                                           * * * * *

 

Flintlock, you are so right about him.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Thursday, September 29, 2022 8:57 PM

NKP guy
 In the 1980's I was the faculty advisor/sponsor for the railroad club at our high school ("The Theodore Roosevelt Guild of Railway Enthusiasts").  A few years after he graduated, I ran into one of our former presidents on the Cedar Point & Lake Erie RR.  He was the engineer, and just as grimy from his work as he might have been had he worked for the New York Central in 1925.  Needless to say, he was delighted with his job!

That reminds me of Winston Churchill's career advice to his children:

"Do what you like, but LIKE what you do!"

He'll never get rich but I'm sure your former student is one happy guy!

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Posted by pennytrains on Thursday, September 29, 2022 6:16 PM

Well I do

Big Smile  Same me, different spelling!  Big Smile

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Posted by wjstix on Thursday, September 29, 2022 3:29 PM

54light15

Don't the locals call it "Frisco?" Devil

 
My understanding (I'm not from there, but do have relatives there) is an emphatic NO!! Wink
 
Stix
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Posted by NKP guy on Sunday, September 25, 2022 7:30 PM

   In the 1980's I was the faculty advisor/sponsor for the railroad club at our high school ("The Theodore Roosevelt Guild of Railway Enthusiasts").  A few years after he graduated, I ran into one of our former presidents on the Cedar Point & Lake Erie RR.  He was the engineer, and just as grimy from his work as he might have been had he worked for the New York Central in 1925.  Needless to say, he was delighted with his job!

   Since then he has spent his working life as a Boomer, employed by several small roads, always in engine service.  The C.P. & L.E. gave him a great start to his career.

   Among my former students are any number of doctors, lawyers, scientists, professors and the like, but just one steam locomotive engineer, of whom I'm very proud. 

 

   

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Posted by CSSHEGEWISCH on Sunday, September 25, 2022 10:01 AM

Most cities have something like that. 

The daily commute is part of everyday life but I get two rides a day out of it. Paul
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Posted by Erik_Mag on Saturday, September 24, 2022 11:57 AM

The "san franCISco" is the way I remember the locals pronouncing during my Bezerkeley years. Bay area was pronounced as one long word...

The San Diego area has a few place names that are useful for separating the locals from the tourists. Garnet is one that comes to mind.

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Posted by 54light15 on Saturday, September 24, 2022 9:56 AM

Don't the locals call it "Frisco?" Devil

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Posted by Overmod on Saturday, September 24, 2022 8:47 AM

Hey, when did SLSF have cable equipment?  That's a whole new one on me.

The accepted correct term for the Bay City is just SF, the same as it is for 'science fiction' instead of sci-fi.

If you must capitalize your stereoisomers, isn't there more of it that's technically San FranTRANSco? Mischief  (What you meant to write was FrANCisco, a left reading-frame, or a register, shift or something, simple but significant...)

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Posted by Overmod on Saturday, September 24, 2022 8:45 AM

.

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Posted by Erik_Mag on Friday, September 23, 2022 11:20 PM

pennytrains

However trains of coaster cars make more sense than trains of Frisco cable cars.  Wink

To be an annoying pedant... Mischief

Many of the cable car lines used a grip car to haul trailers, so some cable lines did operate trains. OTOH, I would expect that the cable trailers were on lines that were relatively flat such as in Chicago as opposed to the steep hills in san franCISco.

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Posted by pennytrains on Friday, September 23, 2022 6:23 PM

True.  Cars are cars and locomotives are locomotives but like die casting, the word train has been morphed by the uninitiated to mean anything they think it should mean.  However trains of coaster cars make more sense than trains of Frisco cable cars.  Wink

Big Smile  Same me, different spelling!  Big Smile

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Posted by Overmod on Friday, September 23, 2022 9:24 AM

One might argue that a railroad definition of 'train' would be more appropriate in this situation than an OED or even Fowlerite one.

But even so, no current coaster would qualify -- they all lack the requisite markers to display...

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Posted by pennytrains on Thursday, September 22, 2022 7:25 PM

Oxford dictionary sez a train is: a series of railroad cars moved as a unit by a locomotive or by integral motors.

Big Smile  Same me, different spelling!  Big Smile

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Posted by CSSHEGEWISCH on Thursday, September 22, 2022 10:02 AM

wjstix

I'd argue - since I'm old and argumentative - that a roller coaster wouldn't count as riding a train, since it's not self-powered.

 
Based on that definition, riding the cable cars in San Francisco wouldn't count, either.
The daily commute is part of everyday life but I get two rides a day out of it. Paul
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Posted by wjstix on Thursday, September 22, 2022 9:55 AM

I'd argue - since I'm old and argumentative - that a roller coaster wouldn't count as riding a train, since it's not self-powered. But riding an amusement park train with an engine of some type and cars would. Just think of it as very-narrow gauge!

Stix
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Posted by BaltACD on Saturday, September 17, 2022 11:31 PM

pennytrains
I've seen photos of Cedar Point's Cyclone.  It lived up to the name.  Although "Nightmare" would probably have been more fitting!  Tongue Tied

Haven't been back to Cedar Point since the late 70's.  Wanted to get the entire family back there last year for a reunion, however, one of my brother-in-laws died unexpectedly.

Never too old to have a happy childhood!

              

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Posted by pennytrains on Saturday, September 17, 2022 6:19 PM

I've seen photos of Cedar Point's Cyclone.  It lived up to the name.  Although "Nightmare" would probably have been more fitting!  Tongue Tied

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Posted by Erik_Mag on Friday, September 16, 2022 11:52 PM

The Cyclone at what used to be Belmont Park in San Diegois my favorite wood roller coaster for nostalgic reasons. First rode it in 1967 with my dad and siblings, last time was circa 2014 with my kids. I told my kids that more time had passed between the first time I rode it and when I rode it with them then had passed between when it was built in 1924/25 and my first time riding it.

RR conection: Belmont Park was one of the last "Electric Parks" built - it was intended to create traffic for the SDERy La Jolla line, which also carried a bit of freight.

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Posted by pennytrains on Friday, September 16, 2022 6:47 PM

Wood coasters.  Back seat.  Big Smile

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Posted by Overmod on Friday, September 16, 2022 12:20 PM

I'm not too fond of those tubular upside-down-and-backward-in-the-dark coasters.  They are sort of like the 35,000 Scoville unit sauce of the ride world.

But strangely even the steepest of the Cyclone-style conventional coasters never really got me upset... because I thought of them as they were originally designed, a more thrilling version of elevated railroads.  Just with more gradients and sharper curve negotiation...

https://www.comicstriplibrary.org/display/957

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Posted by Flintlock76 on Friday, September 16, 2022 10:12 AM

CSSHEGEWISCH
I wasn't much of a coaster rider

Me neither.  Getting the hell scared out of me was never my idea of fun.  It still isn't.   

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Posted by CSSHEGEWISCH on Friday, September 16, 2022 10:06 AM

I can remember that some of the coasters at Riverview (world's largest amusement park!) had a sign saying "Let's go again" and showed a lower rate.  Except for the "Flying Turns", I wasn't much of a coaster rider so I never paid up for a second ride.

The daily commute is part of everyday life but I get two rides a day out of it. Paul
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Posted by pennytrains on Thursday, September 15, 2022 6:47 PM

Well, not nowadays.  In the past they used to let you stay on the cars and ride again at a lower rate.  Wink  Of course if you're like me and loved big coasters and happened to work at a park then you got to play crash test dummy and ride them while they were being tested!  Laugh  Like poling a train car, using employees to test roller coasters is illegal these days.  Smile, Wink & Grin

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Posted by Overmod on Wednesday, September 14, 2022 6:25 AM

Flintlock76
As long as we're on the subject of amusement parks I have to ask:

Do roller coasters count as "Rare mileage?"

The problem is that even if you ride them more than once it isn't much mileage.

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Posted by Erik_Mag on Tuesday, September 13, 2022 10:44 PM

pennytrains

Or when a Fort Wayne engineer decides to lay on the whistle while you're standing beside the 765!  (There's no emoji here for having the crap scared out of you!)

A Gary Larson cartoon comes to mind: Two spiders ad the caption was something to the effect of "Hey Bob, did I scare you or what?".

Also reminds me of Ward Kimball dancing a jig when Ventura County #2 blew its whistle.

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