Trains.com

Australian streamlined Pacific returns to operatiom

1000 views
6 replies
1 rating 2 rating 3 rating 4 rating 5 rating
  • Member since
    June 2002
  • 17,582 posts
Australian streamlined Pacific returns to operatiom
Posted by daveklepper on Saturday, March 13, 2021 1:59 PM
  • Member since
    February 2021
  • From: Germany
  • 142 posts
Posted by Sara T on Saturday, March 13, 2021 2:36 PM

>>http://cs.trains.com/trn/f/740/t/285910.aspx?page=4#3321990<<

 

Congratulations to their perseverance! I wish them good luck and many wonderful miles to cover!

But ...

(if I may dare to say)

wwhhyy but why always greeeeeeeen? And grass-green!  A loco is not a tree and it isn't even green technology. A steam loco is an outright dirty, sooty, and dark technology from the times when environment was just 'the things that happen to be around us'. I believe earth will forgive us running one or the other for recreation purposes. But then let's be honest: a steam locomotive is black and belongs black.

I can understand green locos in Britain because in Britain the clock goes the other way around and they are still dizzy about what locos, what ships, what cars they have brought to the world. (that's why Bexit!) The Southern Ry School class 4-4-0 that they dared to put in front of twelve cars and 'make a brave ascent' up the hills (in apostrophe: quote from old book "The last steam locomotives of Western Europe"), the Mini Cooper, the Jaguar XJ, the Rolls Royce .. the de Havillant Comet (ehm, yes) ...

But in Australia? That much emancipation from The British Empire should have been they choose a different color than this LNER apple green.

How about a 'candy apple red'?

SARA 05003

(initially black and red , but soon just greyish black on DB, maybe with a little beige soot and oil around)

  • Member since
    January 2019
  • From: Henrico, VA
  • 6,475 posts
Posted by Flintlock76 on Saturday, March 13, 2021 4:57 PM

Oh, that is so COOL!  

That streamlining reminds me of the New Haven's "Yankee Clipper," and I don't mind the green paint at all, looks good and is reminiscent of the Southern Railways "Virginia Green" that was applied to their "Georgian" PS-4's.

"Candy Apple Red" would be interesting.  Maybe if it was going to a street rod festival? 

  • Member since
    January 2002
  • 4,256 posts
Posted by M636C on Saturday, March 13, 2021 5:40 PM

wwhhyy but why always greeeeeeeen? And grass-green!  A loco is not a tree and it isn't even green technology. A steam loco is an outright dirty, sooty, and dark technology from the times when environment was just 'the things that happen to be around us'. I believe earth will forgive us running one or the other for recreation purposes. But then let's be honest: a steam locomotive is black and belongs black.

Possibly because it was painted green in regular service?

The locomotive in question was completed in December 1942 and was placed in service early in 1943.

As a result it was painted grey from 1942 until 1946. The first locomotive to enter service in green was 3806 in late 1946. 3806 was not streamlined, but 3805, the fifth streamliner was the first painted green.

3801 was painted black with red striping in the same pattern as the yellow stripes in 1955. I was taken to the nearest main line station, Hornsby, by my father in 1955 and we watched the up and down Newcastle Flyers pass. The southbound (up) train came first with 3801 in black with red stripes, and the northbound followed behind EMD A7 4201. I think the EMD was the loudest train I had heard to that date...

3801 continued in service in black until 1962, when it was withdrawn from regular service.

So, 3801 was:

grey - 1942 to 1947 - four years

green - 1947 to 1955 - seven years

black - 1955 to 1962 - seven years

It was restored to service in 1963 and was painted green again.

It remained green until its most recent withdrawal due to boiler condition in 2007 - 44 years.

It has operated briefly in black and grey after overhauls during the previous period in service.

The present green is said to be an exact match to that used in 1946. A lighter colour was used from 1963.

  • Member since
    February 2021
  • From: Germany
  • 142 posts
Posted by Sara T on Saturday, March 13, 2021 6:34 PM

M636C:

Ok, I see. Thank you for information.

 

Flintlock: street rod festival

ehm - this is a serious site, be earnest! [ ;-) ]

Candy apple red is a bright red metallic or pearl color that is much more glowing red than normal metallic tones. You can see it here (I hope):

color - candy apple red - Bing images

SARA 05003

For me as 05003 I would prefer metal flake black on the upper and a dark bluish-red metallic on the lower part (partition as was standard on DR / DB)  

Du liebe Zeit: wie spät is-das-denn? Huu, I have to leave, bye everyone!

  • Member since
    December 2007
  • From: Georgia USA SW of Atlanta
  • 10,241 posts
Posted by blue streak 1 on Saturday, March 13, 2021 7:46 PM

Noticed that loco front  had both buffers and regular janey ( knuckle ) coupler.

  • Member since
    January 2002
  • 4,256 posts
Posted by M636C on Saturday, March 13, 2021 9:26 PM

blue streak 1

Noticed that loco front  had both buffers and regular janney ( knuckle ) coupler.

 

 

Although the New South Wales Railways adopted the Knuckle coupler in the 1930s its use was confined to freight vehicles and European screw couplers remained in use on passenger trains. As aresult all vehicles retained buffers. A "bollard" on the top of the knuckle allowed the screw coupler to be attached to the knuckle. The centreline of the screw coupler above rail was 3 feet and the centreline of the knuckle was 2'9".

Passenger locomotives often didn't have knuckle couplers.

3801 was fitted with a knuckle coupler on its tender during the 1960s, but retained only the drawhook on the front until 1970. The buffers were removed when the knuckle was fitted in mid 1970 so that the locomotive could run to Western Australia.

The train operated over the South Australian Railways, Commonwealth Railways and Western Australian Railways. The SAR had not used buffers from the 1940s, the CR had never used them since operations began in 1912 and Western Australia had used Norwegian centre buffer couplings on the narrow gauge and only knuckles on the standard gauge (only since 1965).

So crews on those systems would be unaware of the considerable safety dangers concerning buffers.

On its return from Western Australia, buffers were refitted but the knuckles were retained on the front of both 3801 and 3813, the other locomotive used on the trip.

Peter

Join our Community!

Our community is FREE to join. To participate you must either login or register for an account.

Search the Community

Newsletter Sign-Up

By signing up you may also receive occasional reader surveys and special offers from Trains magazine.Please view our privacy policy