Trains.com

Sad but that's progress I guess

2945 views
11 replies
1 rating 2 rating 3 rating 4 rating 5 rating
  • Member since
    July 2020
  • 1,517 posts
Sad but that's progress I guess
Posted by pennytrains on Wednesday, February 7, 2024 6:15 PM

Big Smile  Same me, different spelling!  Big Smile

  • Member since
    January 2019
  • From: Henrico, VA
  • 9,566 posts
Posted by Flintlock76 on Thursday, February 8, 2024 8:01 AM

It's too bad but that's the problem with BIG antiques of any kind, ships, buildings, large airplanes, you name it.  They still have to earn their keep in one way or another and if they can't, sooner or later it's "curtains."

  • Member since
    May 2003
  • From: US
  • 24,924 posts
Posted by BaltACD on Thursday, February 8, 2024 10:03 AM

Never too old to have a happy childhood!

              

  • Member since
    September 2010
  • From: East Coast
  • 1,174 posts
Posted by D.Carleton on Thursday, February 8, 2024 6:45 PM

It is a shame but that is a lot of steel to maintain to keep it presentable. Rust never sleeps. Much like the recent case in North Dakota of a group attempting to forestall the removal of a large BNSF bridge using every trick in the book. When the question arises about care for the structure there are intimations of some sort of State aid but nothing tangible. Hard as we try preservation cannot run on "maybes."

Editor Emeritus, This Week at Amtrak

  • Member since
    July 2020
  • 1,517 posts
Posted by pennytrains on Thursday, February 8, 2024 7:02 PM

Great video! Big SmileThumbs Up

Big Smile  Same me, different spelling!  Big Smile

  • Member since
    January 2019
  • From: Henrico, VA
  • 9,566 posts
Posted by Flintlock76 on Thursday, February 8, 2024 7:28 PM

pennytrains

Great video! Big SmileThumbs Up

I concur!  Thanks Balt!

 

  • Member since
    May 2003
  • From: US
  • 24,924 posts
Posted by BaltACD on Thursday, February 8, 2024 8:29 PM

I worked at B&O's Clark Ave. Yard in Cleveland off and on in 1970-71.  Spent time with crews that worked the Whiskey Island Interchange tracks with the NYC/PC - watching the Huletts work was meszerizing.

Never too old to have a happy childhood!

              

  • Member since
    July 2020
  • 1,517 posts
Posted by pennytrains on Friday, February 9, 2024 11:55 PM

Actually, they kinda scared the crap out of me when I was a kid Tongue Tied

Big Smile  Same me, different spelling!  Big Smile

  • Member since
    July 2006
  • 1,467 posts
Posted by NKP guy on Wednesday, March 20, 2024 8:05 AM

Growing up in Cleveland, I was fascinated by them. But I agree with pennytrains: up close they were scary. They were SO BIG and so...impersonal.

Then, to be at the bottom of a cargo hold and have the thing plunge down inside and be only a few feet away...one felt one could be eaten alive by this double-jawed monster! Very impressive.

  • Member since
    September 2003
  • 21,320 posts
Posted by Overmod on Wednesday, March 20, 2024 9:49 AM

NKP guy
Growing up in Cleveland, I was fascinated by them. But I agree with pennytrains: up close they were scary. They were SO BIG and so...impersonal.

A sure cure for that would be to spend even a couple of minutes in the 'control cab' for one.

They were designed and built in an era of electrical controls that used small physical levers without force feedback, so the whole thing was operated with very short hand motions and very little muscle strain.  There are interesting YouTube videos of the machines in action seen from 'over the shoulder' of the operator -- it actually looks easy to control them with only a few minutes' familiarization, even at frightening top machine speeds!

  • Member since
    July 2006
  • 1,467 posts
Posted by NKP guy on Wednesday, March 20, 2024 2:21 PM

Overmod
it actually looks easy to control them with only a few minutes' familiarization, even at frightening top machine speeds!

That's the thing--the speed at which they went up, down & around; and I couldn't be sure the operator saw me.

Here's a 1918 description of the efficiency of these unloaders:

"Not so many years ago it required a hundred men for a period of twelve hours to unload a 5,000 ton cargo of ore. Four of the improved Hulett machines have again and again demonstrated their capacity to lift a 10,000 ton cargo of ore from a lake vessel and deposit it on the docks in less than five hours, with the services of only twenty-five men of operation."

 

 

  • Member since
    July 2020
  • 1,517 posts
Posted by pennytrains on Wednesday, March 20, 2024 9:35 PM

The first I saw of them was from the river around the time I was in kindergarten in 1976 or 77.  If anyone remembers what the Cuyahoga looked (and smelled) like back then you can get some idea of the impression I got.  Many of the buildings along the river were abandoned, dark and dirty.  There was a passenger steamer half submerged in the oxbow behind the Terminal Tower and the aroma of the blast furnaces turned those enormous dark bucket arms into man eaters!  Tongue Tied

Big Smile  Same me, different spelling!  Big Smile

Join our Community!

Our community is FREE to join. To participate you must either login or register for an account.

Search the Community

Newsletter Sign-Up

By signing up you may also receive occasional reader surveys and special offers from Trains magazine.Please view our privacy policy