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String Lining

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Posted by BaltACD on Thursday, December 1, 2022 6:09 PM

NDG

Evident that Pivot style irrigation isn't used in the area.

Never too old to have a happy childhood!

              

NDG
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Posted by NDG on Thursday, December 1, 2022 5:37 PM
NDG
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Posted by NDG on Tuesday, November 29, 2022 8:01 PM
This JUST CAME IN not two minutes ago!
>
> It looks like your photo of the CP 2-8-2 is a Sherbrooke. See photo in link.
>
>
>
 

Thank You

 

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Posted by rixflix on Tuesday, November 29, 2022 7:53 PM

I found 5300's in Google Bing images. Looks like a CPR class P2(e?) 2-8-2 and would most likely be on that road. Was the class operated system wide or in specific territories?

Rick 

rixflix aka Captain Video. Blessed be Jean Shepherd and all His works!!! Hooray for 1939, the all time movie year!!! I took that ride on the Reading but my Baby caught the Katy and left me a mule to ride.

NDG
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Posted by NDG on Tuesday, November 29, 2022 5:28 PM

 

Where was This Photo Taken? SVP.
 
Several have looked at this ebay image, and know not where it is?
 
 
Thank You.


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Posted by Overmod on Tuesday, November 29, 2022 11:42 AM

That sounds much more like ventilation shaft fans than a rotary converter.

Those have all sort of exciting zarks as they come up to speed, but ought to be fairly quiet running.  There was a large motor-generator just at the IRT tunnel exit by 181st St. that was almost silent in operation - a smooth, well-oiled hum of power.

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Posted by tree68 on Tuesday, November 29, 2022 11:21 AM

blue streak 1
Correct.  One very hot day walking on one of the avenues ( 6th? ) east side north of times square an open door had very loud machinery going and fans blowing out hot air.  Was a motor generator set probably for the subway?

Most likely.  I've seen videos of firing one of those babies up.  Wow.

They handled a lot of amps.

LarryWhistling
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Posted by NKP guy on Tuesday, November 29, 2022 9:49 AM

tree68
I remember seeing a book when visiting my ex's home - "How to Speak New Hampsha..."

   Ever hear a native Ridge Runner speak authentic Pittsburgese?

  ("Yunz don't wear high hills dahntahn to see the Stillers play!")

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Posted by blue streak 1 on Tuesday, November 29, 2022 9:39 AM

tree68

 Correct.  One very hot day walking on one of the avenues ( 6th? ) east side north of times square an open door had very loud machinery going and fans blowing out hot air.  Was a motor generator set probably for the subway?

 
chutton01
NYC

 

An amateur radio friend worked for NYC transit (power department) for years.  You'd be amazed what's hidden in plain sight around the city.

 

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Posted by Backshop on Monday, November 28, 2022 7:01 PM

SD70Dude
    

De Gaulle should have stuffed himself and his "Vive le Quebec libre!" bit where the sun don't shine.  

No room.  He usually had his head there.

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Posted by tree68 on Monday, November 28, 2022 6:52 PM

rixflix
Sometimes I need closed captioning to understand British You Tube narrators.

I remember an anecdote from a while back concerning a "furiner" saying that Americans (ie, US) only know one language.

The retort was that "I speak a pretty good Brooklyn, my Texas isn't bad, and neither is my Carolina..."

I remember seeing a book when visiting my ex's home - "How to Speak New Hampsha..."

LarryWhistling
Resident Microferroequinologist (at least at my house) 
Everyone goes home; Safety begins with you
My Opinion. Standard Disclaimers Apply. No Expiration Date
Come ride the rails with me!
There's one thing about humility - the moment you think you've got it, you've lost it...

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Posted by CSSHEGEWISCH on Monday, November 28, 2022 4:20 PM

rixflix

Sometimes I need closed captioning to understand British You Tube narrators.

Rick    

 
British English isn't that hard to figure out.  Of course, I have spent lots of time in close proximity to a rugby ball and go to the BBC's website for my world news.
The daily commute is part of everyday life but I get two rides a day out of it. Paul
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Posted by rixflix on Monday, November 28, 2022 1:53 PM

My Maman was a WWII war bride. Dad married her in Marseille and they honeymooned on the Cote d'Azur using a borrowed jeep. When our Quebecois friends tried to converse with her she found it nearly impossible to understand.

Sometimes I need closed captioning to understand British You Tube narrators.

Rick    

rixflix aka Captain Video. Blessed be Jean Shepherd and all His works!!! Hooray for 1939, the all time movie year!!! I took that ride on the Reading but my Baby caught the Katy and left me a mule to ride.

NDG
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Posted by NDG on Monday, November 28, 2022 11:29 AM
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Posted by BaltACD on Sunday, November 27, 2022 4:42 PM

NDG

I can only imagine a 21st Century farmer taking a 1/2 ton pick-up load of grain to the elevator.

Never too old to have a happy childhood!

              

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Posted by SD70Dude on Sunday, November 27, 2022 3:21 PM

Grain handling sure has changed and a number of new 'super elevators' have been built in the last 10 years.  Most have a loop or wye and many have power switches at the entrance.  P&H at Viking, Alberta even has their own diamond.  Some are also now loading at a constant slow speed, just like coal mines.  

Overmod - I don't speak it but I've heard that the Quebec accent and form of speech has retained a lot of older characteristics, to the point where someone from modern France might hear it the same way you and I hear Shakespearian English.  

De Gaulle should have stuffed himself and his "Vive le Quebec libre!" bit where the sun don't shine.  

Greetings from Alberta

-an Articulate Malcontent

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Posted by tree68 on Wednesday, November 23, 2022 3:58 PM

chutton01
NYC

An amateur radio friend worked for NYC transit (power department) for years.  You'd be amazed what's hidden in plain sight around the city.

LarryWhistling
Resident Microferroequinologist (at least at my house) 
Everyone goes home; Safety begins with you
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Come ride the rails with me!
There's one thing about humility - the moment you think you've got it, you've lost it...

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Posted by Overmod on Wednesday, November 23, 2022 8:33 AM

A fun thing about the French-Canadians is that they still represent the 'pur sang' of pre-Revolutionary France... the French having killed off a substantial fraction of their men in WWi and WWII.  It took me a while to realize this.  As you get further and further east and north into Quebec, the women get better and better looking, smart, and witty.  I have no difficulty with their preserving... well, their colonial French.  Not for them the ridiculous rephrasing of the diphthong -oi- post-Revolution, "to follow the spelling" which was erratically derived from the pronunciation at about the same time they were introducing decimal time, calculating distance as a forty-millionth of an erroneous measurement of the earth's circumference at Paris, and cutting off each others' heads!  Not for them half the Academie Francaise waiting until the other half went on summer vacation to respell the word for 'onion' to something utterly devoid of historical sense!

I was just a child when de Gaulle tried kissing up to the Canadiens, sending them all sorts of advanced French technology.  You have to see Athabascans in a circle around a DS Citroen trying to figure out how to work on it... when pow! out go six gallons of oil and the thing goes flat in the mud to where nobody can get a jack on it to get to the underside.  Tabar-r-rnac de tabarnacs!

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Posted by chutton01 on Wednesday, November 23, 2022 8:33 AM

NDG
Montreal Subway Ventilation.
 
Thank You.
 
Aussi.
 

Looks like this house has joined the team of hidden ventilation shaft buildings, which includes ones in London (I had passed by those false fronts on a trip to London years ago), NYC (Brooklyn is hightlighed in the link), Paris (those fronts I first heard about on the "Tim Traveler" YouTube channel) and likely other such hidden vents in different cities, since a false residental building fits into the streetscape better than a plain brick & concrete structure.

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Posted by Paul of Covington on Tuesday, November 22, 2022 4:42 PM

NDG
Montreal Subway Ventilation.

   I love it when people respect historical architecture and are willing to spend a little extra to preserve it.

_____________ 

  "A stranger's just a friend you ain't met yet." --- Dave Gardner

NDG
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Posted by NDG on Tuesday, November 22, 2022 11:18 AM

 

Montreal Subway Ventilation.
 
 
Thank You.
 
 
Aussi.
 
 

Merci.

NDG
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Posted by NDG on Friday, November 4, 2022 6:13 AM

FYI.

Interior View Montreal Tramways 1939 From ebay.
 
 
 
One Man Car. On Route 48, St Antoine which was changed to Autobus
 on November 3 1957.
 
Note hinged Wood Seat, front, both sides, which covered Sand Boxes.
 

Thank You.

 

NDG
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Posted by NDG on Thursday, November 3, 2022 11:37 AM
FYI. 
 
CPR Diesel Locomotive Roster.
 
 

Thank You.

 

 

 

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Posted by tree68 on Thursday, October 27, 2022 3:32 PM

CSSHEGEWISCH

No snow blowers for urban streets that I've ever seen. The Illinois Tollway Authority does have winged snowplows in their snowfighting fleet.  They have a definite resemblance to a Jordan spreader when the wings are extended.

A city near me uses snowblowers to clear out the streets as a clean-up method.  Faster than front loaders. Some town and county highway departments have them, and the state definitely does.  We're in the "snow belt," so single snowfalls of a foot or more are always a consideration.

Some municipalities have snowblowers that hang on a front loader.

Virtually all plows used on the highways in this area (and many used in cities and villages) have at least a right side wing.  Some have wings on both sides.  Localities generally use a "wing man," although the state has gone to one-man plows for many routes.  The driver operates the wing.

The underbody scraper I saw used in Michigan back in the day is a rarity here.

LarryWhistling
Resident Microferroequinologist (at least at my house) 
Everyone goes home; Safety begins with you
My Opinion. Standard Disclaimers Apply. No Expiration Date
Come ride the rails with me!
There's one thing about humility - the moment you think you've got it, you've lost it...

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Posted by BaltACD on Thursday, October 27, 2022 2:39 PM

tree68
 
adkrr64
Why is it that the front wheels on graders are designed to tilt from one side or the other? 

I've always been under the impression that it was to better counteract the side force of the blade, particularly when cutting.

Note that when used for cutting (ie, grading a road by taking off the top layer) the angle of the blade itself is different than when it's being used for moving snow, when the angle is more dragging than cutting.  I don't think that's adjustable from the cab - you have to loosen bolts and adjust the tilt of the blade.

Cutting Edge Engineering has a series of videos detailing repairs being made to a Cat Grader.  In this particular video it is demonstrated that the blade can be moved to almost any angle and position that the operator may want for whatever the reaseon.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LK1Wq1HgSVE

 

Never too old to have a happy childhood!

              

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Posted by CSSHEGEWISCH on Thursday, October 27, 2022 1:59 PM

No snow blowers for urban streets that I've ever seen. The Illinois Tollway Authority does have winged snowplows in their snowfighting fleet.  They have a definite resemblance to a Jordan spreader when the wings are extended.

The daily commute is part of everyday life but I get two rides a day out of it. Paul
NDG
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Posted by NDG on Thursday, October 27, 2022 12:57 PM

 

Re Snow Removal.
 
There was usually one 1 fatality a winter in the area of someone
going thru the blades of a snow blower, made the headlines 
of all the Broadsheets and Trashy photo-ladened
Tabloids in the just pre TV era.
 
Comme Ca.
 
 
The man walking in front was for Safety,  advise Blowerman
 to adjust his speed to depth of snow and to guide trucks
 for loading.
 
He also snagged out debris that could flyout at 
Supersonic speeds
 
The Blower Driver steered on the Right, next to curb. Chuteman
 was on left next to truck and guided Chute for filling.
 
When no trucks, snow was spouted to right or left onto lawns.
 
In open country the impeller housing could be tilted to side and
 snow blasted out over fields for long distance.
 
Broken Hockey Sticks from Street Hockey Curb to Curb were
 very common.
 
  Sometime, on purpose buried in the Snow were Ash Cans.
 
 Remember those with Sifters, that were rocked to extract
 unburned Coal or Coke from ashes and clinker in Ashpit.
 
Scary.
 
We burned Coke for hotwater heat, Coal to heat tap water
 in summer when Furnace shut down.
  
For Fast water heat was a Gas Heater which went thru 
the Gas Meter and was pricey.
 

  I lost a wooden sleigh to a Blower, fragments and metal-strip runner found down the block.

 
LARGE Highway 3-Auger Blower casting snow afar and tossing
 ice debris in front.
 
 
Just after the War, most snow blowers had a small gas engine
 in front of Cab for Propulsion 4x4.
 
Behind cab was mounted a large 800 C I or more GASOLINE 
engine for operating the Blower.
 
Usually these engines exhausted vertically and cast a long
 blue flame far into air.
 
No Muffler and they could be heard all over town. Ditto the
 Graders, working hard.
 
Kid magnets.
 
Most to watch, some to bury stuff in the snow.
 
Lots to see, much going on w trucks, plows and so on,
 everyone in a hurry to get traffic moving.
 
Usually the City went around 12 hours before putting up folding
 white on red signs saying No Parkingon ONE SIDE of street to be cleared next and motorists had to move his auto or it
 would be towed.
 
In the AM the Show would begin.
 
 
The Grader's wheels were canted one side or other to allow angle
 of tread and wheel rotation to more firmly counteract the
 'Push' of material being shoved sideways by
 angle of blade.
 
Graders were favorites, and NOISY if still Gasoline.
 
FWIW.
 
In Snow Video.
 
At time 7:06
 
There is a lit Oil Burning Road Flare at corner of Snow Hole.
 
These once were everywhere and hung on chains from tailgates of dump trucks when not in use.
 

http://delmarhistoricalandartsociety.blogspot.com/2018/04/the-highway-torch-or-smudge-pots.html 

 

Thank You.

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