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hostling locomotive

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Posted by 1oldgoat on Wednesday, February 26, 2014 8:59 PM
I was a hostler helper/engine mover at BNs Interbay roundhouse. The great thing about doing this was getting to be a "switchman" and/or "engineer" within the shop area. (Also had to service and supply them.) But it allowed me to run different kinds of locomotives GP9s, C44-9s, RS-3s, SD45s, Amtrak power, yard goats, etc. Plus spotting units on the drop pit where there was just 3" of rail it had to be on. Also throwing switches, planning switching moves, etc. Real RRing without extra boards, long layovers away from home terminal, and all that b.s. In addition, I was on day shift with either a Sat or Sun off. Never better!!
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Posted by BaltACD on Friday, November 15, 2013 7:38 PM

Deggesty

Balt, I did not know your education had been neglected.Smile

Any work (novel or fact) that treats travel by coaches in the 19th century or earlier probably has mention of hostlers handling the horses at places where the horses were changed. It was only natural that when railroads began using men to move locomotives within a terminal that the same term would be applied such men. In some works set in England, they may be called "'ostlers."

I don't read much in the way of 18th or 19th Century liturature.

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Posted by Deggesty on Thursday, November 14, 2013 9:54 PM

Balt, I did not know your education had been neglected.Smile

Any work (novel or fact) that treats travel by coaches in the 19th century or earlier probably has mention of hostlers handling the horses at places where the horses were changed. It was only natural that when railroads began using men to move locomotives within a terminal that the same term would be applied such men. In some works set in England, they may be called "'ostlers."

Johnny

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Posted by BaltACD on Thursday, November 14, 2013 9:35 PM

Never knew the term Hostler applied to horse handling, though it makes perfect sense.

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Posted by Deggesty on Tuesday, October 29, 2013 10:54 AM

The term "hostler" is a bit older than railroading. It had a long term use to describe a person who handled horses at an inn or stage station, changing horses and moving them between a stable and where they were needed immediately. When the need arose for someone to move locomotives locally (as Dschmitt described), the term was applied to the person whose qualification was that he knew how to control the locomotive in that situation--but was not necessarily qualified to operate an engine on the road. And, in time, the term could be applied to an engine (with a hostler in charge) that is used to move another engine locally.

Johnny

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Posted by tomikawaTT on Tuesday, October 29, 2013 10:50 AM

You've mistaken the gerund form of a verb (to hostle) for an adjective.

To hostle - to move a locomotive or locomotives within the confines of a service facility, to spot for service/maintenance or to move to a ready track after service/maintenance.

The over-the-road engine crew was off-duty as soon as the train arrived at its destination.  Getting the newly-arrived locomotives moved from the train to the fuel rack (or coaling station/water crane/ash pit) and then to the outbound ready track was, and is, the job of the hostler.

The actual root of the word hostle refers to handling horses in a stable or yard...

Chuck

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Posted by DSchmitt on Tuesday, October 29, 2013 2:27 AM

From the Glossary on this site

 

"

Hostler
A workman who services locomotives between runs and moves them around an engine terminal."
 
Therefore,    Hostling is moving locomotives within  a terminal area

I tried to sell my two cents worth, but no one would give me a plug nickel for it.

I don't have a leg to stand on.

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hostling locomotive
Posted by GM1361 on Tuesday, October 29, 2013 1:02 AM

what is hostling locomotive?

C. Hostling Locomotive
Multiple locomotive consists may be moved within a terminal area
with only the brake pipe connected under these conditions:
• Distance traveled does not exceed 2 miles.
• Speed does not exceed 10 MPH.
When starting movement with only the brake pipe connected:
1. At a speed of 1 to 3 MPH, apply the automatic brake by making
a 10 psi brake pipe reduction. Make sure the brakes apply.
2. After stopping, release the automatic brake and make sure all
brakes release.

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