Trains.com

Subscriber & Member Login

Login, or register today to interact in our online community, comment on articles, receive our newsletter, manage your account online and more!

Looking for 1900s era O-scale passengers?

1580 views
9 replies
1 rating 2 rating 3 rating 4 rating 5 rating
  • Member since
    March 2011
  • From: Westford MA
  • 474 posts
Posted by Tophias on Monday, February 26, 2024 7:26 AM

MisterBeasley

The Mount Washington was sold to the railroad in the early 1920s.  Before that, she was known as the Lady of the Lake.  She sailed on Lake Winnipesaukee in New Hampshire.  That's the lake where they filmed On Golden Pond.  The ship and railroad met in Meredith, New Hampshire.  I'm not sure how close the railroad came to the dock, but it might be a nice diorama scene.

 

 

Mr. B, I hate to be trivial but I need to correct you here. On Golden Pond was filmed on Squam Lake. I guess you, I, and the other fellow New Englanders here are the only ones who would really care (if at all Big Smile) about this.

Regards, Chris 

  • Member since
    December 2004
  • From: Bedford, MA, USA
  • 21,386 posts
Posted by MisterBeasley on Sunday, February 25, 2024 9:04 PM

MidlandPacific

I think the railroad ran onto the dock at Meredith- it certainly did at Wolfeboro.

I looked at a map of present-day Meredith.  I don’t know if anything has changed, and it might have,  but today's map shows the train tracks curving away from the docks, not going towards them.

It takes an iron man to play with a toy iron horse. 

  • Member since
    February 2003
  • 1,138 posts
Posted by MidlandPacific on Sunday, February 25, 2024 4:58 PM

I think the railroad ran onto the dock at Meredith- it certainly did at Wolfeboro.

http://mprailway.blogspot.com

"The first transition era - wood to steel!"

  • Member since
    December 2004
  • From: Bedford, MA, USA
  • 21,386 posts
Posted by MisterBeasley on Sunday, February 25, 2024 4:42 PM

The Mount Washington was sold to the railroad in the early 1920s.  Before that, she was known as the Lady of the Lake.  She sailed on Lake Winnipesaukee in New Hampshire.  That's the lake where they filmed On Golden Pond.  The ship and railroad met in Meredith, New Hampshire.  I'm not sure how close the railroad came to the dock, but it might be a nice diorama scene.

It takes an iron man to play with a toy iron horse. 

  • Member since
    February 2003
  • 1,138 posts
Posted by MidlandPacific on Sunday, February 25, 2024 8:50 AM

Second the Stadden recommendation.  He does amazing stuff

http://mprailway.blogspot.com

"The first transition era - wood to steel!"

  • Member since
    November 2013
  • 2,696 posts
Posted by snjroy on Thursday, February 22, 2024 3:15 PM

You might look up some specialized 3D prints or pewter molds, like this one:

https://www.modelu3d.co.uk/product/1580/

or this:

https://www.acstadden.co.uk/shop-4

 

Found with following keywords: O scale figure 3d

Simon

  • Member since
    September 2003
  • 21,484 posts
Posted by Overmod on Saturday, February 17, 2024 11:34 AM

See the various posts by Mel Perry about how he made, configured, and posed the great number of people in 'Mel World'.  Most of those techniques will translate nicely to 1:48.

Also see the P:48 Modelers group for ideas.  When you go to weather that boat, you'll find a wealth of good posts, and current community members with good advice.

  • Member since
    February 2024
  • 2 posts
Posted by rcboater on Friday, February 16, 2024 11:47 PM

Thanks- that helps a lot!   I made a rookie mistake:   I was searching for "O-scale 1900s Passengers", which didn't  anything useful.

 

  • Member since
    December 2004
  • From: Bedford, MA, USA
  • 21,386 posts
Posted by MisterBeasley on Friday, February 16, 2024 10:06 PM

I found quite a few by googling "O scale 1900s figures."  The are appropriately dressed and in reasonable poses.  They are, as you'd expect, not cheap.  If you only need a dozen or two these should suffice.  Otherwise, you can repaint then and keep them separated by a bit.  For more variety, you can do some plastic surgery with a razor saw and some glue to rearrange arms and legs.

I have a lot of figures on my HO layout.  Many are passengers inside coaches, cars and busses.  None look the same thanks to cheap craft paint.  I've even taken some cheap, unpainted figures and turned them into Dorothy, the Tin Woodsman, the cowardly Lion and the scarecrow.  It was just moving a few limbs, adding features with plastic putty and painting.

It takes an iron man to play with a toy iron horse. 

  • Member since
    February 2024
  • 2 posts
Looking for 1900s era O-scale passengers?
Posted by rcboater on Thursday, February 15, 2024 8:06 PM

I am new here, usually found over on the FineScale Mofdeler forums....

 

I'm an RC scale ship modeler and a plastic scale model builder primarily.  I am a regular participant on several forums focused on those areas, and am well aware of what a great resource they are.    I registered here for two reasons:

 

1.  I am going to be building the Dumas 1/48 scale kit  of the steam-powered  sidewheeler “Mt Washington”, which sailed Lake Winnepesaukee in NH from 1880 to 1939.   The model is almost 4 feet long, and will be radio controlled.  1/48 is a very popular scale in the plastic modeling community, but primarily in the aircraft subjects and to a lesser extent, tanks and military vehicles.   There are lots of kits and accessories in those areas, but very little in the auto and civilian side.

 

 

I would like to do the boat as it apppeared in 1906, but passenger ships look incomplete without people on board!    I figure my best hope to find suitable. figures is in the O-scale Model RR world.....

 

Dumas Mt Washington

 

1906 photo

 

But this won't be a one time visit-- My RC scale boat club is embarking on a project to build 1/48 scale harbor docks, barges,  and other facilities.  1/48 is a popular scale for builders of RC scale tugs, and we have several in the club.  We are inspired by what we see British RC boat clubs doing, and want to start down that path.   We are fortunate to have a member who also has an O-scale layout (mid-late 20th century), who has already built a couple of piers with industrial-type buildings.

Again, ideas, techniques, and suppliers in the O-scale community seem like a good fit.....

 

 

 

Subscriber & Member Login

Login, or register today to interact in our online community, comment on articles, receive our newsletter, manage your account online and more!

Search the Community

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
Model Railroader Newsletter See all
Sign up for our FREE e-newsletter and get model railroad news in your inbox!