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Weekend Photo Fun - June 24th through June 26th, 2022

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Weekend Photo Fun - June 24th through June 26th, 2022
Posted by SeeYou190 on Friday, June 24, 2022 12:00 AM

Living the dream and happily modeling my STRATTON AND GILLETTE Railroad in HO scale. The SGRR is a freelanced Class A railroad as it would have appeared on Tuesday, August 3rd, 1954, in my personal fantasy world of plausible nonsense.

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Posted by SeeYou190 on Friday, June 24, 2022 12:00 AM

Hello everyone, and welcome to a new weekend!

This week my share is kind of a sad one. This is the last train car I can complete until my new workshop is up and running. When I took down my workbench I kept out a few close-to-complete projects that I could finish easily. This is the last of the projects I left out.

This is a brass tank car model by Overland. The lettering is all custom and fictitious.

I guess I will just be sharing old photos for a while until the new layout is under construction and the workbench is back in service.

Please feel free to join in and share a fun photograph.

-Kevin

 

Living the dream and happily modeling my STRATTON AND GILLETTE Railroad in HO scale. The SGRR is a freelanced Class A railroad as it would have appeared on Tuesday, August 3rd, 1954, in my personal fantasy world of plausible nonsense.

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Posted by NorthBrit on Friday, June 24, 2022 3:38 AM

Thanks for starting WPF, Kevin.

A great looking tank car.

 

A busy time here at the moment, so an old picture seen at Clarence Dock.

'Who is a naughty boy then?'

 IMG_4971 by David Harrison, on Flickr

 

Back later.

 

David

To the world you are someone.    To someone you are the world

I cannot afford the luxury of a negative thought

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Posted by gmpullman on Friday, June 24, 2022 4:22 AM

Thanks for opening the LAST of June WPF, Kevin. Yes! Next Friday is already July 1 and the daylight hours are getting shorter!

You can't go wrong with Overland, of course Cool Looking Cool! How about some plackards?

 1930 placards by Edmund, on Flickr

Your scene is excellent, David. Brickwork and shadows perfect. Reminiscent of Oliver Twist Yes Looks like the boy was caught nipping coal?


 This week I "aged" my overhead roadway with some light rusting on the girders and roadway oily marks on the surface. I wired the lights and, wouldn't you know since they're DC LEDs —

 Bridge2 by Edmund, on Flickr

      ...wait for it —

I used a bridge rectifier Ick!

 

 Bridge1 by Edmund, on Flickr

There was recently a thread about things you can't see inside a passenger car or the underside of any railroad car. I was thinking of that when I built this beautiful Kibri Tool Shed:

 Tool-shed0 by Edmund, on Flickr

Right now it is just in preliminary light primer but I was pretty impressed with the post and beam construction and every rafter is there plus wood graining on the underside of the roof.

 Tool-shed3 by Edmund, on Flickr

I've had this kit sitting on the shelf since 1996 never thinking I'd have a place for it. Glad I didn't toss it or give it away. It was included in the Kibri Factory complex which I used as a chemical plant in an other area.

 Tool-shed1 by Edmund, on Flickr

Seems a shame that no one will really be able to appreciate these nifty details. The building will be tucked in behind the packinghouse.

 Tool-shed by Edmund, on Flickr

Of course this is still a developing scene but I'm getting there slowly Smile

Lets make this a great WPF! On to more excellent contributions, folks.

Regards, Ed

 

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Posted by "JaBear" on Friday, June 24, 2022 5:46 AM
Thanks for kicking us off again Kevin, I’m looking forward to see your new workshop and layout build.
 
If you give a “Wooden top” lip, be prepared to get a clip around the ear, and marched home to the “Old man” for another clip or three!!! Great scene, David.
 
Ed, the evolution and further development of an already fine layout is interesting and inspiring.

On Her-in-Doors and I trip to Taranaki, we got to revisit the Tawhiti Museum and got to have a chat with the founder and model maker extraordinaire, Nigel Ogle, a great guy. Apart from the fact that he makes all his figures, I’m really impressed with his use of forced perspective. This scene of a local railway tunnel being constructed is about 18 inches deep. He does it by eye and I’d say that the fore ground ffolkes were O scale with the rear N.

Tunnelers by Bear, on Flickr
 
 
Looking forward to your really Good Stuff,
Have a Great One ffolkes.
 Cheers, the Bear.Smile

"One difference between pessimists and optimists is that while pessimists are more often right, optimists have far more fun."

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Posted by tbdanny on Friday, June 24, 2022 6:31 AM

Kevin,

Your tank car model looks good.  You've done a good job with the lettering.

David,

That's a good scene.  I like seeing things like that, where the figures tell a story.

Ed,

That's some good weathering on your bridge, and the details on the toolshed look fantastic.

Bear,

Thank-you for sharing that tunnel photo.  It's an incredible piece of modeling.


 

As for me, I've finally finished the scenery on the top deck of my layout:

Once I finish cleaning the tracks and resetting everything for ops, I'm going to do an opening ceremony, with one of my locos running through a 'ribbon' across the tunnel portal.  Haven't decided which loco yet.

The Location: Forests of the Pacific Northwest, Oregon
The Year: 1948
The Scale: On30
The Blog: http://bvlcorr.tumblr.com

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Posted by dti406 on Friday, June 24, 2022 9:42 AM

Good morning from sunny and warm Northeast Ohio!

Kevin, thanks for starting us out, great looking tank car, I have had good luck with the Intermountain kits, but I do change out some of the plastic parts for metal ones for durability.

David, thanks for showing us your little scenes on the layout, they are always unusual and well done.

Ed, some great model work and leave the puns to those who do them well like Bear.

Bear, nice looking scene you took a picture of, it is amazing how we got things done in the past without the major equipment we now have to build tunnels etc.

TBDanny, that is some impressive layout work can't wait for the ceremonial ribbon cutting picture.

I built some easy kits this last week!

Another Bowser 1958CF ACF Covered Hopper kit, painted with Scalecoat II Black paint and lettered with Highball Graphics decals. This car adds to the fleet for either cement from the Dundee MI cement plant or sand from the Yuma, MI sand pit.

Bowser PRR X31 Boxcar kit, painted with Scalecoat II Hunter Green and Black Paints then lettered with Prime Mover Decals. The Hoboken Shore was formed in 1954 from the Hoboken Manufacturers Railroad that served the docks and industries in Hobken, they had more yard track mileage than mainline mileage. The railroad was in financial trouble and in 1971 they took advantage of the new IPD rules by purchasing 50 old boxcars from the PC to send out for revenue, these cars did not last long as they were approaching 50 years of age in 1974. And as they lost the IPD revenue and lack of business the railroad folded in 1978.

Rapido Ann Arbor FA-2's with a general freight led by some of my fleet of Covered Hoppers in the sand service out of Yuma, MI headed for the Ford Engine Casting Plant in Brookpark, OH.

Thanks for looking!

Rick Jesionowski

Rule 1: This is my railroad.

Rule 2: I make the rules.

Rule 3: Illuminating discussion of prototype history, equipment and operating practices is always welcome, but in the event of visitor-perceived anacronisms, detail descrepancies or operating errors, consult RULE 1!

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Posted by snjroy on Friday, June 24, 2022 12:01 PM

Thanks Kevin for kicking-off the WPF thread. My prediction is that your workshop project will gain some speed!

David, nice picture. I'm always amazed how you manage to come up with a new picture every week. How big is your layout??

Ed, nice weathering job. Your layout is progressing fast!

Bear, thanks for sharing. The compression effect is amazing...

TBDanny, I like the color tones of your layout. It brings out the details nicely.

Rick, your decalling work continues to impress me.

These last few weeks, I've been focussing on a few locomotive projects that have been taking a lot of calendar time. I managed to finish one of them, an HOn3 Grandt line GE 25-Tonner. After a lot of tweaking, I managed to get it to run fairly well. Instead of the wires supplied in the kit, I used pieces cut from a phosphore bronze sheet for power pickup. Extra weight was added, as well as a DCC decoder. 

 IMG_20220622_195702 on Flickr

Simon

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Posted by NorthBrit on Friday, June 24, 2022 2:56 PM

Ed.   Yes, the boy has been caught stealing.

As for your pictures?  I marvel at your modelling.  Well done.

 

Bear.   A clip around the ear.   Don't remind me.  Whistling

The Navvy scene?   Brilliant!!!

 

tbdanny.   I too like to have figures etc to have a reason to be where they are.

Your scenery looks really good.  Well done.   As for running a train for the 'Opening Ceremony'?   A double header perhaps?

 

Rick  I try to do scenes I see and not what I thought I saw.

Your kits are amazing.   I wish we could get decals  here in the U.K.

 

Simon.   Simple scenes we see every day.  That is all I do.   All in 11ft by 8ft (give an inch either way).

The green diesel is cute.  Big Smile

 

David

To the world you are someone.    To someone you are the world

I cannot afford the luxury of a negative thought

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Posted by gmpullman on Friday, June 24, 2022 7:34 PM

dti406
Ed, some great model work and leave the puns to those who do them well like Bear.

Thank you —

and I will heed your advice.

 

 

 

    Ed

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Posted by SeeYou190 on Friday, June 24, 2022 8:20 PM

gmpullman
Thank you — and I will heed your advice.

Wait a second...

I was ROFLing after reading the "Bridge Rectifier" comment.

Keep em' coming Ed.

Laugh

-Kevin

Living the dream and happily modeling my STRATTON AND GILLETTE Railroad in HO scale. The SGRR is a freelanced Class A railroad as it would have appeared on Tuesday, August 3rd, 1954, in my personal fantasy world of plausible nonsense.

  • Member since
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Posted by "JaBear" on Friday, June 24, 2022 11:56 PM

Rec Something!! by Bear, on Flickr

"One difference between pessimists and optimists is that while pessimists are more often right, optimists have far more fun."

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Posted by NorthBrit on Saturday, June 25, 2022 9:01 AM

Some old photographs.

 

'Waiting'

 

 IMG_5693 by David Harrison, on Flickr

 

I like the overgrown look.   Class 47  47583  'County of Hertfordshire'  with Military Train heading North.

 

 IMG_5694 by David Harrison, on Flickr

 

Waiting at the signal.

 

 IMG_5517 by David Harrison, on Flickr

 

'After the rain'.

 

 IMG_5726 by David Harrison, on Flickr

 

David

To the world you are someone.    To someone you are the world

I cannot afford the luxury of a negative thought

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Posted by HO-Velo on Saturday, June 25, 2022 10:19 AM

Kevin, Thanks for opening the WPF with a good looking tank car.  Hopefully your bench won't be long out of service.

Ed, Like your road weathering, a nice touch of realism.  Guessing the dark streak down the middle of lanes are due to oil leakage and older vehicles crankcase blow-by.

Bear, 'I like work, I can watch it for hours', and Mr. Ogle's wonderful scene certainly draws the eye for many a long look.

New or old, I like all the pics.  Thanks to all the contributors and viewers.  Have a good weekend and a happy National Canoe Day.  Regards, Peter

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Posted by gmpullman on Saturday, June 25, 2022 5:16 PM

HO-Velo
Guessing the dark streak down the middle of lanes are due to oil leakage and older vehicles crankcase blow-by.

Thanks, Peter.

Somehow those dark streaks look more pronounced in the photo than when actually viewing the road surface in person. It is Pan Pastel brushed on there and I can easily lighten it by going over it with "concrete" color.

We probably see less of this effect today since, I suppose, auto engines are better sealed against oil leaks (remember the crancase vent tubes that drained on the roadway?) and it seems like more pavement is asphalt surfaced than bare concrete so there's less contrast.

 Woodland Park crossing over Aurora Avenue, 1935 by Seattle Municipal Archives, on Flickr

 Memorial Tunnel on West Virginia Turnpike WV by William L. Bird, on Flickr

Good Luck, Ed

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Posted by pt714 on Saturday, June 25, 2022 7:01 PM

Fabulous work, everyone.

I've been offline for a while, it's been over a year since I was able to set up the layout-- but we prioritized finding space for it in our new place (just moved out west) and I finally have trains running again. Snapped a few photos today during inaugural switching ops.

Phil

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Posted by Mister Mikado on Saturday, June 25, 2022 11:32 PM

got my ebay rivarossi 5104 turntable in the mail yesterday.  no controller so the fun this weekend has been figuring out the wiring.  it still runs after 50 years BUT stopped whenever it felt like.  gave the gears and shafts a lube job, cleaned up the motor brushes, and the switch points that only let the motor run when the index locking pin is up.  no luck.  would run most of the way around and stop.  a nudge got it going again but that's no way to run a railroad.

finally remembered from other photos of this dinosaur--check the contact circles and wipers. flipped the turntable, popped the ring and washer holding the center shaft and looked everything over.  nothing looked too dirty but i cleaned every metal surface with contact cleaner and put the turntable and ring back on.  still jerky.

what solved it was lightly scraping the ring surfaces and bending all the contacts outward so they all pressed against the circles with more force.  now the bridge makes a flawless complete 360 rotation in either direction.  made my weekend!

ps anybody else doing this repair--which may apply to other brands--those wipers are old so bend them up extremely carefully.  also the shaft locking ring spreads apart when removed so one has to crimp it tight again.  you don't want to lose that ring.  and you have to put the ring and washer back on for every test to maintain full contact pressure.

i've jabbered enough so everybody enjoy your weekend.   -rob

 

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Posted by "JaBear" on Sunday, June 26, 2022 5:23 AM
Paddle by Bear, on Flickr
 
tbdanny, great stuff, but you realise that you spoilt me with your January 2020 video update; like Oliver Twist, “Can I have some more, please”!!
 
Rick, great to see you’ve mended well enough to get the projects under way again.
 
Simon, extra weight and a decoder, too much for a ham-fisted bear to comprehend!!!
 
More scenes fromDavid. Yahoo!!!!
 
Ed, nothing like a prototype photo as a modelling aid, thanks.
 
Phil, good to see that you’ve got the layout up and running, can’t beat having a supportive wife.
 
Mr Mikado, proof that having patience, pays. Well done.
 
 “I like work, I can watch it for hours”. To be honest so can I,Peter. The first time Her-in-Doors and I visited the museum was over two years ago and we spent over four hours, looking. If it wasn’t that we had a prior engagement to attend, it would have been longer. This time we got three hours, and were not disappointed, not only was there a new exhibit but the rest was well worth a second look. I only wish I wasn’t a 4 ½ hour drive away because, I’d be more than happy to help out on the running of the large layout. Talking to him, Nigel Ogle, like most of us, has projects “for Africa”! And I get the impression that he’s already planning well ahead. Like I said, a great guy.
 
Anyhow, more modelled scenes, using forced perspective, of the local Taranaki history....
 
Bush warfare by Bear, on Flickr
 
Mounted Kupapa by Bear, on Flickr
 
Delivering the cream by Bear, on Flickr
 
Coastal shipping by Bear, on Flickr
 
This is one of seven interlinked dioramas featuring the Ngati Toa migration, south. These contain a combined 800 figures, all made by Nigel Ogle.
 
Tribal migration by Bear, on Flickr
 
Thanks to everyone for sharing their really Good Stuff, there’s time for more!!
Cheers, the Bear.Smile

"One difference between pessimists and optimists is that while pessimists are more often right, optimists have far more fun."

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Posted by John-NYBW on Sunday, June 26, 2022 8:31 AM

gmpullman

 

 
HO-Velo
Guessing the dark streak down the middle of lanes are due to oil leakage and older vehicles crankcase blow-by.

 

Thanks, Peter.

Somehow those dark streaks look more pronounced in the photo than when actually viewing the road surface in person. It is Pan Pastel brushed on there and I can easily lighten it by going over it with "concrete" color.

We probably see less of this effect today since, I suppose, auto engines are better sealed against oil leaks (remember the crancase vent tubes that drained on the roadway?) and it seems like more pavement is asphalt surfaced than bare concrete so there's less contrast.

 Woodland Park crossing over Aurora Avenue, 1935 by Seattle Municipal Archives, on Flickr

 Memorial Tunnel on West Virginia Turnpike WV by William L. Bird, on Flickr

Good Luck, Ed

 

Dark streaks down roadways is the norm and not limted to being caused by older vehicles. As you say, it is more pronounced on concrete than it is on asphalt which most road surfaces are, but it is still visible. When asphalt is first laid down, it is black. Overtime, two things happen. The asphalt is bleached by the sun until it is a light gray while at the same time, residue from vehicles builds up creating the streaks. I put this effect into all my roads whether rural or city. I use AIM weathering powders and choose Grimy Black to weather my roads. I put a thin streak down the center of each lane and then rub it down with a dry paper towel to blend it into the surface. Here's an example from a photo I posted earlier

 

UPDATE: I found a few images that show the effects of streaking over time. The first shows a fairly newly paved road that is still a dark gray. Streaking is barely visible.

two-lane-highway-little-traffic-30451385.jpg (1300×958) (dreamstime.com)

The next three show that as the pavement gets lighter, the streaks become more noticeable.

vEabR.jpg (300×200) (imgur.com)

view-of-two-lane-road-through-autumn-trees-west-hurley-new-york-video-id160239189 (640×360) (gettyimages.com)

empty-dual-carriageway-two-lane-highway-picture-id183807881 (1024×682) (istockphoto.com)

 

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Posted by SeeYou190 on Sunday, June 26, 2022 10:15 AM

Happy Sunday morning everyone. 

David: As always... thank you once again for a great little scene from your layout.

Ed: Placards will be coming later. Thanks for the suggestions. I loved and laughed at the Bridge Rectifier joke. Your lighting is fantastic. The Kibri tool shed does have a nicely made interior and big doors to see it.

Ed: That is a great example of forced perspective in that scene. In North Florida there is a museum dedicated to Stephen Foster that has several dioramas with forced perspective. I have not been there in decades. I hope they are still there.

Danny: All that scenery looks great. You have really made something special there.

Rick: Great freight cars again this week. I had never heard of the HOBOKEN SHORE, and I appreciated the history of this roadname you shared.

Simon: Great little critter. I have built a few through the years, but never tried to get one to run.

Peter: That guy in the canoe looks likehe is heading for a good day.

Phil: It is good to hear that your layout is running again. I look forward to seeing more of it.

Rob: Impressive story about fiddling with the old turntable. Great work. 

There is still some weekend left. I am looking forward to more.

-Kevin

 

Living the dream and happily modeling my STRATTON AND GILLETTE Railroad in HO scale. The SGRR is a freelanced Class A railroad as it would have appeared on Tuesday, August 3rd, 1954, in my personal fantasy world of plausible nonsense.

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