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Weathering Powder Effects Without Using Weathering Powders

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Posted by doctorwayne on Wednesday, June 22, 2022 12:31 AM

Sparky Rail

Wayne-

That heavily rusted gondola floor looks great! 

 
Thanks for your kind comment, Sparky, it's much appreciated.
 
Here's another gondola, not as rusted, but one of four that I scratchbuilt onto four Tichy kit-built flatcars...
 
 
 
...the rivet detail was done, inside and out, using Archer 3-D decals...
 
 
Wayne
 
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Posted by doctorwayne on Wednesday, June 22, 2022 12:19 AM

Nidely-done locomotive, Jeff, both with the paint job and the subtle weathering.

That's about the same degree of weathering that I consider for most of my locomotives, too...not just out of the paint shop, but not heading for the scrapper's torch either...

Wayne

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Posted by groundeffects on Tuesday, June 21, 2022 10:08 PM

My go-to for the last few years have been Pan-Pastels.  I've used them for locos and rolling stock, as well as for buildings and even parking lots.  Here is a N scale loco I weathered using this product:

steam engine

I generally do not heavily weather my locos and rolling stock, so the Pan Pastels really work great.  About the only paints I use for weathering are the following: burnt sienna for couplers, and flat grimy black for siderods and steam engine wheels.  Both colors are brush painted on using a microbrush. 

Jeff

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Posted by Sparky Rail on Tuesday, June 21, 2022 9:30 PM

Wayne-

That heavily rusted gondola floor looks great! 

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Posted by PRR8259 on Tuesday, June 21, 2022 8:54 PM

Note specifically that Penn Central painted the interiors of many hundreds if not thousands of brand new and repainted mill gondolas a freight car red shade, and then there was green overspray onto it at the corners of the car.  Tangent has captured this with their new gondolas.  So the gondola interiors are not always just merely rust, but may differ from the exterior color.

Where possible it is always best to find a photo.

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Posted by hornblower on Tuesday, June 21, 2022 1:30 PM

I used to use pastel chalks until I tried Pan Pastels.  Night and day difference.  The Pan Pastel media tends to stay in place without an overspray, just like make-up.  I have also found that the longer the Pan Pastel applications go undisturbed, the harder it gets to smudge.

Hornblower

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Posted by FRRYKid on Tuesday, June 21, 2022 1:35 AM

jjdamnit

Using brown colors you could streak the orange base, to simulate the variation in the rust- -by whatever means you choose.

I actually hadn't realized that. I might just use that idea. I have plenty of various brown acylics that I can drybrush. I can use the rest of the article for other ideas and I found the prototype picture for my particular car.

"The only stupid question is the unasked question."
Brain waves can power an electric train. RealFact #832 from Snapple.
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Posted by doctorwayne on Tuesday, June 21, 2022 12:26 AM

Well, I've just been bamboozled a second time by both photobucket, which is now very difficult to use, but also by this site which just now dissolved my latest ready-to-post offering on weathering.

We'll soon  know when the "too many pictures" problem is done.

 

In the meantime, here's a boxcar with some light airbrushed wheelspray...

...and some more visible wheelspray...

 

 

 

...both done using this homebuilt masking device...

As for rust in gondolas, here's a not too rusted one....

...while this one has rust from the inside face of the car's sides, and likely also from various ladings over the years...

 

 I think I'm just about done.

Wayne

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Posted by HO-Velo on Monday, June 20, 2022 7:29 PM

Renowned artist Malcolm Furlow championed a simple weathering technique that he called 'Dirt Dipping'; basically placing a model in a box of plain ol' dirt and giving it a good coat of dusty grime by hand.

Regards, Peter   

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Posted by jjdamnit on Monday, June 20, 2022 2:35 PM

Hello All,

Apparently, coal oxidizes the inside of a hopper a rust color.

FRRYKid
I have the orange base coat but from there I'm a bit stuck.

Using brown colors you could streak the orange base, to simulate the variation in the rust- -by whatever means you choose.

Lighter shades of brown/orange could be used to also enhance the exterior of the cars.

Keep us informed on your progress/solution(s).

And as always...

Hope this helps.

"Uhh...I didn’t know it was 'impossible' I just made it work...sorry"

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Posted by FRRYKid on Monday, June 20, 2022 2:21 PM

If it helps any, I'm weathering the inside of a gondola. The guide I'm using calls for "dark weathering powders." It is from an MRH article on weathering the Scale-Trains CBQ ex-coil gondolas. I have the orange base coat but from there I'm a bit stuck.

"The only stupid question is the unasked question."
Brain waves can power an electric train. RealFact #832 from Snapple.
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Posted by jjdamnit on Monday, June 20, 2022 1:14 PM

Hello All,

I went to Michael's craft store and bought a 24-piece Sof Pastels Portrait Tones artist chalk set

As some have suggested you can grind (sand) or shave off the chalk and use a dry brush technique.

Or with a clean brush- -especially for light colors- -brush the stick directly, similar to a dry brush technique.

Hope this helps.

"Uhh...I didn’t know it was 'impossible' I just made it work...sorry"

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Posted by NorthBrit on Monday, June 20, 2022 12:43 PM

Interesting suggestions being suggested.

To throw in my My 2 Cents.

My wife Dawn buys  make-up in pallettes that have various browns.   When they 'get low' she gives them to me.   Just by dusting rolling stock the desired effect is done.   I find there is no need to spray the stock as the powders remain in place.

 

 IMG_5493 by David Harrison, on Flic

 

David

To the world you are someone.    To someone you are the world

I cannot afford the luxury of a negative thought

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Posted by NorthsideChi on Monday, June 20, 2022 12:28 PM

I just go to the art store and buy a variety of charcoal chalks. I then scrape it on paper towel or swab and apply.  It doesn't seem to come off or get on your hands when handling the model unless you apply water. 

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Posted by PRR8259 on Monday, June 20, 2022 11:42 AM

Howard Zane weathers his steam engines with just powdered graphite.  He believes that he gets a good weathered look that represents real life by just rubbing in the powered graphite with paint brushes.  You do not clear coat the models--that would lessen the effect--and the best thing is that if you really want to remove the powdered graphite, it is possible but takes a little gentle scrubbing with soap and water (I've done this and cleaned the graphite off with cotton swabs using soap and water).

No gloppy thick powders, no mess, no fuss...though you might get a little graphite on your hands from handling models.  Maybe Howard rubs it in better than I do, but the models on his layout look fantastic.

John Mock

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Posted by doctorwayne on Monday, June 20, 2022 11:37 AM

Rather than using so-called weathering powders, I'd suggeast that you go to an art-supply  store, and pick up some oil-based pastel sticks, in a variety of browns, greys, and some black ones, too.
To use them, I rub them over some coarse sandpaper, then dump the resultant powder into suitable container...blister packs from small items work well and are readily available.
Pick a not-too expensive brush, dip it into the powder, then apply to the item to be weathered.  You can brush- or blow-off any excess or even wipe it with a rag or paper towel.

I've found that the oil component helps to fix the powder in-place, and after a few days, it doesn't seem to come off with careful handling, so there's no need to apply a clear overspray.

If you accidently put on too much or a colour you want to change, it should be removable with dish soap and warm water, then rinse and let dry for another attempt.

Here are a couple cars done with the oil-based pastels...

Sorry, but photobucket seems to be currently in a tailspin.  I'll add a couple more later, if it becomes possible.

Wayne

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Posted by rrebell on Monday, June 20, 2022 10:25 AM

People use all kinds of powders for weathering but like you said you tend to have to overweather as the spray removes some of the powder visually. Many use pastels now as they do not disapear as much. One of my favorite types of weathering is watercolor pencils, very little disapears with them. You use the pencils and then blend them with water to get the effect you want, don't like it, wash it off and start over. I use this way all the time for flat car decks but works elsewere as well.

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Posted by wvgca on Monday, June 20, 2022 7:38 AM

sure, thinned paint out of an airbrush ....

wait, you don't have an airbrush ??

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Posted by mobilman44 on Monday, June 20, 2022 5:17 AM

I never attempted using an airbrush for weathering, and even though I have the powder kits, they didn't appeal to me - maybe because I felt I couldn't control the result very well.

So my "go to" weathering was always a brushed on wash.  Typically for rolling stock I would open a Testors flat black, rust, and thinner bottle.  Using a brush suitable for the job, I would touch the tip into the black, then the rust, and then quickly dunk it in the thinner.  

I would tap it on a paper towel (to get rid of excess thinner) and then paint the area to be weathered.  This worked (IMO) really well for truck sides and couplers.

For structures, I'd use a flat brush and "paint" it in the direction rain would run off the roof/sides.  That especially (again IMO) worked very well.

Now the trick is to start light and repeat if you want it darker/heavier.  You can always add, but its difficult to take away.

 

ENJOY  !

 

Mobilman44

 

Living in southeast Texas, formerly modeling the "postwar" Santa Fe and Illinois Central 

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Weathering Powder Effects Without Using Weathering Powders
Posted by FRRYKid on Monday, June 20, 2022 2:35 AM

Got yet another one for my Forum friends. Is there a way to replicate the effect of a weathering powder using something other than the weathering powder or something akin to powders? Everything I have read tells me that the powders don't stand up to being sprayed on (Flat finishes, etc.), they are a pain to work with as to the mess, etc. I don't own an airbrush so that complicates weathering. However, I've gotten very good at drybrushing and similar techniques with paint. (I have an old pencil cup that is quite full of brushes. I've had that cup for around 30 years. It came from a neighbor of my grandmother when my parents and me were helping clean the house when she was moved to a care facility.)

As usual, thank you for any assistance that can be provided.

"The only stupid question is the unasked question."
Brain waves can power an electric train. RealFact #832 from Snapple.

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