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Liquid cement bottles

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Liquid cement bottles
Posted by John-NYBW on Wednesday, April 28, 2021 4:40 PM

I'm looking for a solution to the problem of spilled bottles of liquid cement. I've lost count of the times I have done this over the years. I try to be careful and set the bottle down out of the way but at some point I forget and a clumsy arm will knock the bottle over and as often as not it drenches the piece I am working on.

I thought I'd found a solution with a pack of small alcohol dispenser bottles with a metal stem shorter but similar to those on the Labelle oil bottles. What I discovered is the cement flows too freely through the stem to control unless the stem gets clogged. Then when you squeeze it to break up the clog, you get a gusher. Obviously these bottles are ill suited for this purpose. 

Does anyone have a solution to the problem of spilled liquid cement bottles. I wish someone would offer a liquid cement bottle like what is used for India ink bottles. It is a cone shaped bottle with a wide bottom that makes them extremely spill resistant. Here is an example:

Amazon.com: Speedball Super Black India Ink, 2-Ounce

I would use an empty India Ink bottle but the caps don't have an applicator brush. Does anyone make something similar for liquid cement bottles. 

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Posted by 7j43k on Wednesday, April 28, 2021 5:05 PM

I rumaged around the wood bin and found a piece that was 4" x 4" x 2 1/4" thick.  I drilled a hole a bit bigger than the bottle most of the ways through, from the large face.

I find it impossible (no, I've not really tried) to spill the bottle.

 

 

Ed

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Posted by BigDaddy on Wednesday, April 28, 2021 5:24 PM

I do what Ed did.  I took a piece of 1/2 ply and drilled a hole to accomodate Tru scale, model master and Bondene bottles and and oval hole to accomodate CA and a few small holes to fit a paint brush. I glued that to another piece of 1/2" and ran it through a table saw until it was square.

I haven't unpacked enough from my move to take a picture.

To tweak the direction of the thread, Devil there are micro spouts which fit on glue bottles.  Do these clog up?

Henry

COB Potomac & Northern

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Posted by richhotrain on Wednesday, April 28, 2021 5:36 PM

I was particularly concerned about Plasti-weld in the orange labeled bottle. So, I stole a small circular Tupperware bowl from the pantry, placed the Plasti-weld bottle in it, and wrapped a rag around the bottle. No way that it will tip over or spill. 

Rich

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Posted by John-NYBW on Wednesday, April 28, 2021 5:47 PM

The Tupperware idea sounds like it might work for me. I think I have an old plasic tub too. Hollowing out a wood base seems like a good idea too but I don't think I have a drill with a large enough diameter for the Plastruct cement bottles I use. Using a Dremel with a spiral saw bit might be difficult on a piece thick enough to do the job. I've tried that in the past and it produces lots of smoke. 

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Posted by doctorwayne on Wednesday, April 28, 2021 6:16 PM

7j43k
I rumaged around the wood bin and found a piece that was 4" x 4" x 2 1/4" thick. I drilled a hole a bit bigger than the bottle most of the ways through, from the large face.

Yeah, similarly, I used a scrap of 2"x4" then drilled an almost suitably-sized hole right through it, using a spade bit.  Since the bottle I was using is an old Solvaset bottle, I had to use a keyhole saw and a very coarse mill file to "sorta square" the hole...more like crapsmanship rather than craftsmanship. 
It does work to prevent spills, though, and the bottle is a tight fit, so it won't slip through if I pick it up by the block.  The Solvaset brush-in-cap works well with the cement, which is MEK, but I do usually use paint brushes, sized to suit the job at hand when applying the cement....

Wayne

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Posted by SeeYou190 on Wednesday, April 28, 2021 6:23 PM

I glued mine to a 2 1/2" round plastic base.

Then I glued a whole bunch of unused bits and pieces to the base.

Now it is like a piece of modern artwork.

-Kevin

Wink Happily modeling my STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD. A Class A line located in a personal fantasy world of semi-plausible nonsense on Tuesday, August 3rd, 1954.

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Posted by Overmod on Wednesday, April 28, 2021 6:29 PM

What I use is a shortened plastic cup, attached at the bottom to a strip of heavy flexible rubber that won't mark table surfaces.  The rubber conforms to the surface and keeps the cup from tipping, and the bottle sits in the cup.

I got the idea from a holder that was sold for La-Z-Boy style chairs, molded in one piece with a 'socket' for your beer and two little ears that straddle the arm to make a non-tip "cupholder".  I found that if you lay this flat on a mattress it does just fine too...

I have also found that the principle of the Rapidograph can work to keep those metal or plastic hypodermic glue tips clear.  Get a long thin piece of wire and make a small 'head' on one end, that will fit under the cap when pressed on to seal the tip.  Dip this in solvent and slide it into the tip to clear it when needed; if the glue hardens around it you can often torque it free.

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Posted by selector on Wednesday, April 28, 2021 6:36 PM

These are all great ideas.  I haven't done much, if any, of this kind of painting, at least not in recent years.  Just thinking:

Elbows are a problem in any direction and at any height.  Placement of the holder-mit-bottle (I know better than to try to get c.u.m. past the censor) will present risk to itself, to the item being painted, but also to anything else in the arc of movement possible, including other tools, other kits, brushes, holders, etc.  So, I would probably lean toward a bored length of 2X4, maybe with up to three holes, and it would be screwed down somewhere to the side of my painting arm so that elbow movements would be restricted and precluded from sweeping up over the working surface. With deep enough wells, the bottle should be all but impossible to tip.

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Posted by SeeYou190 on Wednesday, April 28, 2021 6:37 PM

Overmod
What I use is a shortened plastic cup, attached at the bottom to a strip of heavy flexible rubber that won't mark table surfaces.  The rubber conforms to the surface and keeps the cup from tipping, and the bottle sits in the cup.

I need a picture. I cannot visulize what you are describing.

-Kevin

Wink Happily modeling my STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD. A Class A line located in a personal fantasy world of semi-plausible nonsense on Tuesday, August 3rd, 1954.

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Posted by Boiler-man on Wednesday, April 28, 2021 6:46 PM
I too had those issues. Now I use a foam swimming noodle, cut to about 1/2 the height of the liquid cement bottle and if the hole in the noodle is to small I gust cut it lengthwise to allow it to open to fit around the bottle, this works for all of my paint and cement bottles. The noodle is about 6 ft. long and provides a lot of donuts to keep you from spilling paint and liquid cements, plus if you are like me I use alot of toothpicks and I poke them in the foam so they are handy and easy to grab one when you need one.
Boilerman
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Posted by Boiler-man on Wednesday, April 28, 2021 6:53 PM

 Noodle Donut for Liquid Cement spillage

Boilerman
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Posted by Boiler-man on Wednesday, April 28, 2021 7:10 PM

Noodle Use For Stopping Spills

Boilerman
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Posted by cowman on Wednesday, April 28, 2021 7:10 PM

Similar to using a block of wood, you could use a scrap of 2" extruded foam. easy to cut to any size or shape bottle.  If the glue damages the foam, easy to make another.

Good  luck,

Richard

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Posted by richhotrain on Wednesday, April 28, 2021 7:24 PM

John-NYBW

The Tupperware idea sounds like it might work for me. I think I have an old plasic tub too. 

This little sucker isn't going anywhere. It is impervious to tipping or spilling.

Rich

P1020759.jpg

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Posted by York1 on Wednesday, April 28, 2021 7:35 PM

Boilerman, for some reason I had trouble getting to your photo.

Here it is after I found it:

York1 John       

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Posted by maxman on Wednesday, April 28, 2021 7:36 PM

selector
and it would be screwed down somewhere to the side of my painting arm

That sounds pretty painful to me.

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Posted by KitbashOn30 on Wednesday, April 28, 2021 8:06 PM

2 bottles inside a partly used roll of masking tape is good enough for my purposes.

1 bottle has enough room to tip over - 2 bottle uses up that room

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Posted by rrebell on Wednesday, April 28, 2021 11:47 PM

My daughter made a ceramic cup with a very wide base in grade shool, it just happens to be the right size for a bottle.

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Posted by Overmod on Thursday, April 29, 2021 12:02 AM

selector
and it would be screwed down somewhere to the side of my painting arm so that elbow movements would be restricted and precluded from sweeping up over the working surface.

I assume he means a mahl stick by 'painting arm' -- a cantilevered arm rest that positions your painting hand close to an area getting fine attention away from an 'edge'.

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Posted by selector on Thursday, April 29, 2021 12:23 AM

maxman

 

 
selector
and it would be screwed down somewhere to the side of my painting arm

 

That sounds pretty painful to me.

 

Why, yes..........it does.  Laugh

I ought to have said that I would anchor the three-holed block to the bench on the same side as my painting arm, my left it happens.

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Posted by 2ManyHobbeez on Thursday, April 29, 2021 9:15 AM
I use a Touch-N-Flow applicator now. It goes a long way between reloads. You can cap the solvent bottle until the next filling. Way more accurate than using a brush too.
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Posted by dknelson on Thursday, April 29, 2021 10:44 AM

maxman
 
selector
and it would be screwed down somewhere to the side of my painting arm

That sounds pretty painful to me.

 

 
A surgically implanted bottle of cement is just the best idea ever, ranking right up there with sharpening your teeth so they can hold Kadee couplers while you work.  Next: a skin graft that attaches the uncoupling tool to your index finger.  That, and an arm tattoo with DCC programming instructions and you're good to go: a model railroader for life.  
 
Dave Nelson
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Posted by Boiler-man on Thursday, April 29, 2021 12:37 PM
I am sorry,, I had never posted a photo and was just too tired to follow the instructions correctly, however i do now know how.
Boilerman
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Posted by maxman on Friday, April 30, 2021 10:08 AM

dknelson
ranking right up there with sharpening your teeth

If you are going to do this, might as well have a wedge shaped space ground between the two upper front ones so that you can also strip wire.

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Posted by ricktrains4824 on Friday, April 30, 2021 4:18 PM

The liquid Plastiweld cement sold at my local HobbyLobby just so happens to be the exact same diameter of the skinny rolls of Gorilla Tape they also sell.... Sits tightly inside the tube, and zero chance at spilling that.

Ricky W.

HO scale Proto-freelancer.

My Railroad rules:

1: It's my railroad, my rules.

2: It's for having fun and enjoyment.

3: Any objections, consult above rules.

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Posted by zstripe on Saturday, May 1, 2021 1:55 PM

maxman

 

 
selector
and it would be screwed down somewhere to the side of my painting arm

 

That sounds pretty painful to me.

 

I'll bet Pinocchio wouldn't feel it!.....lol ,lol..Whistling

Take Care!Smile, Wink & Grin

Frank

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Posted by Medina1128 on Tuesday, May 4, 2021 1:59 AM

I used a short length of 2x4 with holes that I drilled with paddle (spade) bits. For odd-shaped bottles, I drilled the hole then finish-sizing the hole with a Dremel with a sanding drum. I glued and screwed some legs to the bottom side. Try as I might, I couldn't tip it over.

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Posted by Remeyer53 on Tuesday, May 4, 2021 8:10 AM

I have several old glass baby food jars. I put liquid plasit cement bottles in them. I also use them for the Micro-scale decal setting solutions, which are tall thin bottles as well.

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