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which brand dcc/sound locos do you buy?

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which brand dcc/sound locos do you buy?
Posted by ChrisVA on Wednesday, April 28, 2021 1:08 PM

I'm curious what brands most people usually buy for either steam or diesel. It seems the most common brands I see are Broadway Limited and Bachmann. I have a couple of BLI's that I am happy with. Bachman, not so much - seems to be lower end/lower quality stuff.  

I found Stewarts to be very good runners, just have to convert them to DCC, which seems relatively easy. How about Rapido/Atlas/Intermountain? Other?  I'm looking for smooth slow speed, DCC/sound, holds up over time.

Thanks in advance.

 

 

 

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Posted by Doughless on Wednesday, April 28, 2021 1:16 PM

Diesel only.

I used to buy almost exclusively Atlas.  Now it mainly Athearn Genesis and Athearn RTR.  A few Atlas.  Some new Walthers NW2s.  I've got 2 Intermountains.

Reasons vary, but the main reason is that ATH now uses LEDs, and is the company that has more contemporary paint schemes and details, IMO; which is consistent with my theme of modern shortline/branchline.

Most of my locos have been purchaed in the past 18 months.  A bit of a buying spree from funds acquired from selling off accumulated nonsense.

No ScaleTrains.  No Bachmann.  No Rapido. Never owned a BLI or MTH.

Nothing I'm aware of that would keep me from owning them, just never met my needs or price at the time.

For locos made in the past 10 years, I think mechanically they are all about the same.  All run smooth and slow, but the ATHG needs some CVs set to run slow enough, IMO.

I would not look at any locomotive and think it would not last as long as any other.

- Douglas

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Posted by riogrande5761 on Wednesday, April 28, 2021 1:42 PM

ChrisVA

I'm curious what brands most people usually buy for either steam or diesel. It seems the most common brands I see are Broadway Limited and Bachmann. I have a couple of BLI's that I am happy with. Bachman, not so much - seems to be lower end/lower quality stuff.  

I found Stewarts to be very good runners, just have to convert them to DCC, which seems relatively easy. How about Rapido/Atlas/Intermountain? Other?  I'm looking for smooth slow speed, DCC/sound, holds up over time.

Thanks in advance.

Diesel here.  I don't buy based on brand only, but rather look for the best fit for my interests, which is primarily D&RGW from about 1977 thu end of caboose era.  I don't randmly buy based on brand or characteristics but for a RR family theme.  My secondary interest is SP which I grew up with in northern California.

Mostly I have Athearn, Athearn Genesis, Atlas, ScaleTrains and Walthers.  Reason being they make good quality versions of engines I need.  I generally skip Bachmann, Broadway Ltd.  The only Broadway I have are a couple of Utah Rwy RSD15's because BLI is the only company who makes them in plastic.

I only have one Rapido diesel and it's the Amtrak F40PH but it's the early one; I am planning to buy the regular Amtrak F40PH when they are out later this year.  I have a few older Proto2000 engines as well, mainly GP30's, and I hope to replace them with ScaleTrains or Genesis if either gets around to making a high fidelity GP30 with road specific details.

The only Intermountain engine I have is an SP 3rd run Cab Forward, my "one off" steamer.

Rio Grande.  The Action Road  - Focus 1977-1983

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Posted by JDawg on Wednesday, April 28, 2021 1:42 PM

I'm an Atlas guy myself. Gp7's, Rs3's, s2's, ect. They use ESU sound decoders with BEMF. Super easy to achieve slow speed operation without tampering with speed tables, just basic cv changes. Sound is average, but they are quality locomotives that hold their value over time. Atlas doesent have tons of road specific detail but always look the part. Great for operators who aren't super discerning.  Rapidos stuff is super nice, but you pay for detail. For me personally, I don't care about underbody detail, because, if I ever see the bottom of a locomotive, something has gone seriously wrong. Hope this helps.

JJF


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Posted by riogrande5761 on Wednesday, April 28, 2021 1:47 PM

I'm an Atlas guy myself. Gp7's, Rs3's, s2's, ect. They use ESU sound decoders with BEMF.

Not all Atlas engines use ESU Loksound.  I have a few that came with QSI sound, which are not considered the greatest and AFAIK, that company went out of business.

Keep in mind some of these companies have changed OEM sound providers.  Athearn, for example, equipped their Genesis engines for a number of years with MRC, which were poor quality.  They later switched to Soundtrax Tsunami 1, which many have complained about lousy motor control and weak horns.  

Rio Grande.  The Action Road  - Focus 1977-1983

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Posted by Lastspikemike on Wednesday, April 28, 2021 2:43 PM

I like Rapido best.

I also like the quality of Atlas locomotives.

Most of my other stuff is previously owned if not actually used. Lifelike is the best of those.

Bachman Spectrum steam locomotives are pretty good but their diesels tend to have noisy gearsets. 

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Posted by ricktrains4824 on Wednesday, April 28, 2021 3:18 PM

I am also not loyal to a brand, but buy what fits my layouts theme and era.

Of my Factory sound equiped, diesels:

ScaleTrains - 1 - Very nicely done. Would have loved more, but they are pricey.

Walthers Mainline - 1 - Less detail, but very smooth drivetrain. Price was good. (Soon to become 2.)

Bachmann - A handfull of NS Heritage units, all found on a closeout sale, All but one at under $100 each, brand new, with factory sound. I have no running issues with them. One has a decoder defect on the ditch light circuit, but still operates smoothly. My one Bachmann Steamer also has sound, and is a very smooth runner. (NKP 765. Had to get her.)

Intermountain - 2 - Both well made, but a light pipe issue on the one. Solid runners though.

Bowser - 4 - Some of my absolute favorites. (Soon to become 5.)

AthearnGenesis - 2 - One great, one had the old bulb lighting, but runs well. Those bulbs die way too quickly though, and are a royal pain to replace.

Atlas - 2 - One QSI, one ESU. ESU one certainly runs much better. 

FoxValley - 1 - Aside from a bad DOA ESU decoder, runs great.

Athearn RTR - 1 - Decently done. Less fine details, but the recently designed with LED's are smooth.

BLI - 2 - One DOA, but that was a issue of a seller online sending a known defective in place of the as described NIB. Other is smooth runner. (Was refunded and told to use for parts once fraud charges were brought up as a possible recourse when he refused return.)

I have more non-sound, from Bachmann, Atlas, Athearn, Stewart (1), Proto, and Intermountain, and some will be converted eventually.

But overall, I've not noticed any mechanical issues in diesels in the last 10-15 years.

You might find issues with older Bachmann, Proto, etc... But even guys like Athearn & Atlas have had clunkers in the past. And all manufacturers could have a one-off bad one.

I have never had any locos from Rapido nor MTH.

Steam - 3 - 1 Bachmann (765 above.) and 2 BLI. The 2 BLI are both smooth runners, but the one, a 2-8-2 Mike, has always had Chuff Sensor issues, due to a very poor design by BLI. (Very poor use of a magnetic reed switch.) The second was after they eliminated the chuff sensor issue, and is all good.

Recent steam with few exceptions are also generally smooth runners. Older ones not as reliable.

Ricky W.

HO scale Proto-freelancer.

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1: It's my railroad, my rules.

2: It's for having fun and enjoyment.

3: Any objections, consult above rules.

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Posted by selector on Wednesday, April 28, 2021 3:20 PM

I have rolling stock and locomotives from:

Athearn

Atlas

Bachmann

Broadway Limited Imports

Life Like (now Walthers)

Rapido

Rivarossi

Trix

Trueline Trains (gone, I think...)

Walthers

All are good and reliable, but if I had to pick one brand that gives me the most problems over the past 15 years, it would have to be Broadway Limited.  I also have about three times as many of them as any other brand, so maybe no wonder.

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Posted by Ringo58 on Wednesday, April 28, 2021 3:36 PM

So far ive only purchased Athearn Genesis, Walthers Proto, Atlas master and Scale trains. Id rank them as this

Scale Trains

Athearn Genesis

Walthers Proto

Atlas Master

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Posted by BigDaddy on Wednesday, April 28, 2021 5:17 PM

I wouldn't have a BLI loco if it was free, nor Bachmann sound value.

My second foray into model railroading was in the late 80's early 90's when I had two boys.  Stewarts were new stock, Atlas had Roco or Kato motors and the Cumberland yard was full of GP7 and GP9's (whether they still were used, I'm not so sure)

In my third foray into MR, look at the date on my avatar, I bought 2 Bachmann Spectrum steamers, and a third 3 truck Shay.   I unpacked a Bachmann GP30 and the paint fell off in big flakes.  I believe they are split frame design and I did not convert that one, but I did my Atlas RS-3's and Stewart F7 and the Shay.  My Lionel Hustler always sounded like a coffee grinder and it will reside in my scrap yard.

While the super detailing is great, I watch "open the box" youtube videos and stuff is broken on arrival or getting it out of the box.  At 69 I don't need to spend the money for fragile detail.  I remember MR articles from around 1990 about adding speed recorders.  I thought, why do I need to spend the effort to add that little itty bitty thing that I won't be able to see from four feet away.  I have not changed my opinion.

I love the work and the videos that Jason at Rapido is doing.  Except for the RDC, there is nothing there for my era and locality.

Henry

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Posted by JDawg on Wednesday, April 28, 2021 6:14 PM

ChrisVA

I'm curious what brands most people usually buy for either steam or diesel. It seems the most common brands I see are Broadway Limited and Bachmann. I have a couple of BLI's that I am happy with. Bachman, not so much - seems to be lower end/lower quality stuff.  

I found Stewarts to be very good runners, just have to convert them to DCC, which seems relatively easy. How about Rapido/Atlas/Intermountain? Other?  I'm looking for smooth slow speed, DCC/sound, holds up over time.

Thanks in advance.

 

 

 

 

 

I think Chris you need to specify what is important to you in a locomotive. If you love the detail, go with the afore mentioned scale trains or rapido. If you are more focused on running and have a tighter budget, maybe stick to a Walthers mainline or atlas. Just my opinion, don't take it too seriously

JJF


Prototypically modeling the Great Northern in Minnesota with just a hint of freelancing. Smile, Wink & Grin

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Posted by ATLANTIC CENTRAL on Wednesday, April 28, 2021 9:59 PM

ChrisVA

I'm curious what brands most people usually buy for either steam or diesel. It seems the most common brands I see are Broadway Limited and Bachmann. I have a couple of BLI's that I am happy with. Bachman, not so much - seems to be lower end/lower quality stuff.  

I found Stewarts to be very good runners, just have to convert them to DCC, which seems relatively easy. How about Rapido/Atlas/Intermountain? Other?  I'm looking for smooth slow speed, DCC/sound, holds up over time.

Thanks in advance.

 

 

 

 

As you can see, you are going to get opinions all over the map.

A few thoughts:

There is no one "perfect" or best brand in this business.

Judging strictly by the brand will be a mistake, just because one product had a problem or did not suit your needs, don't assume everything from that company will be unstatisfactory.

Bachmann makes entry level, mid level and some high level stuff. This idea is apparently hard for some people to grasp. I have 35 Bachmann steam locos, they are all great. I have only a few of their small diesel switchers, most of their diesels do not meet my needs.

A better approach is to decide what locos you want models of, then learn about who makes the best EMD F7, or the best USRA 4-8-2, or the best GP7.

Restricting yourself to a few supposedly "better" brands will limit choices and you will still end up with some defects and duds.

My disclaimer, and the reason I did not offer any specific recommendations - I do use DCC or sound on my layout.

Sheldon 

    

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Posted by richhotrain on Wednesday, April 28, 2021 10:04 PM

ATLANTIC CENTRAL
 
ChrisVA

I'm curious what brands most people usually buy for either steam or diesel. It seems the most common brands I see are Broadway Limited and Bachmann. I have a couple of BLI's that I am happy with. Bachman, not so much - seems to be lower end/lower quality stuff.  

I found Stewarts to be very good runners, just have to convert them to DCC, which seems relatively easy. How about Rapido/Atlas/Intermountain? Other?  I'm looking for smooth slow speed, DCC/sound, holds up over time.

Thanks in advance. 

As you can see, you are going to get opinions all over the map.

A few thoughts:

There is no one "perfect" of best brand in this business.

Judging strictly by the brand will be a mistake, just becuase one product had a problem or did not suit your needs, don't assume everything from that company will be unstatisfactory.

Bachmann makes entry level, mid level and some high level stuff. This idea is apparently hard for some people to grasp. I have 35 Bachmann steam locos, they are all great. I have only a few of their small diesel switchers, most of their diesels do not meet my needs.

A better approach is to decide what locos you want models of, then learn about who makes the best EMD F7, or the best USRA 4-8-2, or the best GP7.

Restricting yourself to a few supposedly "better" brands will limit choices and you will still end up with some defects and duds.

Sheldon  

Yes  +1

Alton Junction

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Posted by Lastspikemike on Thursday, April 29, 2021 9:29 AM

ATLANTIC CENTRAL

 

 
ChrisVA

I'm curious what brands most people usually buy for either steam or diesel. It seems the most common brands I see are Broadway Limited and Bachmann. I have a couple of BLI's that I am happy with. Bachman, not so much - seems to be lower end/lower quality stuff.  

I found Stewarts to be very good runners, just have to convert them to DCC, which seems relatively easy. How about Rapido/Atlas/Intermountain? Other?  I'm looking for smooth slow speed, DCC/sound, holds up over time.

Thanks in advance.

 

 

 

 

 

 

As you can see, you are going to get opinions all over the map.

A few thoughts:

There is no one "perfect" or best brand in this business.

Judging strictly by the brand will be a mistake, just becuase one product had a problem or did not suit your needs, don't assume everything from that company will be unstatisfactory.

Bachmann makes entry level, mid level and some high level stuff. This idea is apparently hard for some people to grasp. I have 35 Bachmann steam locos, they are all great. I have only a few of their small diesel switchers, most of their diesels do not meet my needs.

A better approach is to decide what locos you want models of, then learn about who makes the best EMD F7, or the best USRA 4-8-2, or the best GP7.

Restricting yourself to a few supposedly "better" brands will limit choices and you will still end up with some defects and duds.

My disclaimer, and the reason I did not offer any specific recommendations - I do use DCC or sound on my layout.

Sheldon 

 

Missing a "not". 

Alyth Yard

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Posted by Lastspikemike on Thursday, April 29, 2021 9:35 AM

richhotrain

 

 
ATLANTIC CENTRAL
 
ChrisVA

I'm curious what brands most people usually buy for either steam or diesel. It seems the most common brands I see are Broadway Limited and Bachmann. I have a couple of BLI's that I am happy with. Bachman, not so much - seems to be lower end/lower quality stuff.  

I found Stewarts to be very good runners, just have to convert them to DCC, which seems relatively easy. How about Rapido/Atlas/Intermountain? Other?  I'm looking for smooth slow speed, DCC/sound, holds up over time.

Thanks in advance. 

As you can see, you are going to get opinions all over the map.

A few thoughts:

There is no one "perfect" of best brand in this business.

Judging strictly by the brand will be a mistake, just becuase one product had a problem or did not suit your needs, don't assume everything from that company will be unstatisfactory.

Bachmann makes entry level, mid level and some high level stuff. This idea is apparently hard for some people to grasp. I have 35 Bachmann steam locos, they are all great. I have only a few of their small diesel switchers, most of their diesels do not meet my needs.

A better approach is to decide what locos you want models of, then learn about who makes the best EMD F7, or the best USRA 4-8-2, or the best GP7.

Restricting yourself to a few supposedly "better" brands will limit choices and you will still end up with some defects and duds.

Sheldon  

 

 

Yes  +1

 

 

OP asks what we buy (presuming we do so out of preference). 

OP doesn't ask why but clearly interested in why.

Utility of our answers depends on the objective of the OP in asking which he doesn't say.

So, list what you buy, why and relate your reasons why to what you are trying to acquire. For what kind of layout and operations.

Best to buy DCC dual mode these days even if you run mainly DC at the moment.

Everything new is probably DCC ready but often without a speaker or wiring for a speaker so not really "ready". The best DCC ready are coming with a speaker and its wiring installed it seems to me. The model is sold without decoder to capture the special market of buyers who want to put in their own choice. 

Alyth Yard

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Posted by Doughless on Thursday, April 29, 2021 10:34 AM

There is also the school of thought where you buy the kind of loco that runs well, sounds well, and lights well, and then whatever body configuration covers the mechanism adjust the model railroad to accomodate.  Only model the locos of the railroad that operate well as models.

But that's becoming moot.

Atlas, Walthers, and ATHG locos all use their proprietary drivetrains in each of their product lines (Athearn RTR is legacy).  No matter what diesel they build, the motor, trucks, and electronics are the same from loco to loco, so there are not really any winners or stinkers among their products.  Switchers might use shorter motors, but my experience is that they operate the same as the larger locos.

Can't speak to how other companies do it.

- Douglas

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Posted by JDVass on Sunday, May 2, 2021 12:11 PM
I have a couple of Bachmann steam loco's. I don't like their diesels. They are noisy and don't look as nice as others. For Diesels I have Atlas, Bowser, Rapido, Intermountain, Walthers Proto, Athearn Genesis, BLI, one Fox Valley and a couple of Walthers Mainline. All are great runners and great looking. The Walthers Mainline need some detailing to match the others but they run great and sound good. I generally don't worry to much about brand, instead I look for locos I like. If you stick to the main brands your going to get a good looking, good running, and good sounding loco.
Life is too short not to play with trains, so grow old not up my friends.
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Posted by tstage on Sunday, May 2, 2021 1:06 PM

I don't purchase dcc/sound locomotive by "brand"; my purchases are primarily dictated by my era and road name (NYC).  Since how they operate is the most important to me, I look for locomotives that are smooth runners first.  With that in mind, I usually choose (in no particular order) locomotives from Stewart/Bowser, Atlas, Proto 2000, Intermountain, Trix, Kato, BLI, and Walthers.

I've also done more & more DCC non-sound/sound installs myself so it really doesn't matter to me if a locomotive comes "DCC-ready" or not.  This is particularly true with some specific brass locomotives that I've purchased over the past 5 years.  Converting them to DCC has been challenging at times...but it's also been fun and gratifying.

For smooth runners: Stewart/Bowser & Atlas have been the most consistent for me and those I have the most of in my roster.  However, every brand has had it's studs & duds so you really have to look at locomotives on a case-by-case basis rather than brand.

Tom

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Posted by ATLANTIC CENTRAL on Sunday, May 2, 2021 1:22 PM

Doughless

There is also the school of thought where you buy the kind of loco that runs well, sounds well, and lights well, and then whatever body configuration covers the mechanism adjust the model railroad to accomodate.  Only model the locos of the railroad that operate well as models.

But that's becoming moot.

Atlas, Walthers, and ATHG locos all use their proprietary drivetrains in each of their product lines (Athearn RTR is legacy).  No matter what diesel they build, the motor, trucks, and electronics are the same from loco to loco, so there are not really any winners or stinkers among their products.  Switchers might use shorter motors, but my experience is that they operate the same as the larger locos.

Can't speak to how other companies do it.

 

When did this word legacy get this extra meaning? So what if the design of the drive is "old", if it still works well, it still works.

I hear people use this word in this way all the time now, like it is some politically correct word for obsolete?

I don't get it?

Sheldon

 

    

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Posted by JDawg on Sunday, May 2, 2021 1:29 PM

ATLANTIC CENTRAL

 

 
Doughless

There is also the school of thought where you buy the kind of loco that runs well, sounds well, and lights well, and then whatever body configuration covers the mechanism adjust the model railroad to accomodate.  Only model the locos of the railroad that operate well as models.

But that's becoming moot.

Atlas, Walthers, and ATHG locos all use their proprietary drivetrains in each of their product lines (Athearn RTR is legacy).  No matter what diesel they build, the motor, trucks, and electronics are the same from loco to loco, so there are not really any winners or stinkers among their products.  Switchers might use shorter motors, but my experience is that they operate the same as the larger locos.

Can't speak to how other companies do it.

 

 

 

When did this word legacy get this extra meaning? So what if the design of the drive is "old", if it still works well, it still works.

I hear people use this word in this way all the time now, like it is some politically correct word for obsolete?

I don't get it?

Sheldon

 

 

 

Kind if like the Atlas Classic line. Sure they are locos with older tooling, but under the hood they are solid. 

JJF


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Posted by PRR8259 on Sunday, May 2, 2021 1:35 PM

I buy the models that I can like that have acceptable (to me) quality standards.  I don't like handrails that lean excessively or are too weak and flimsy, sloppy glue/assembly fit issues, and motors that fail too often.  I like highly detailed models but not at the expense of quality and durability.  I'll accept slightly thicker diecast running boards on a steam engine over plastic "scale" thickness running boards that are breakable.

Please see my post below; I agree with much of what Douglas said above.

John

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Posted by Lastspikemike on Sunday, May 2, 2021 1:58 PM

ATLANTIC CENTRAL

 

 
Doughless

There is also the school of thought where you buy the kind of loco that runs well, sounds well, and lights well, and then whatever body configuration covers the mechanism adjust the model railroad to accomodate.  Only model the locos of the railroad that operate well as models.

But that's becoming moot.

Atlas, Walthers, and ATHG locos all use their proprietary drivetrains in each of their product lines (Athearn RTR is legacy).  No matter what diesel they build, the motor, trucks, and electronics are the same from loco to loco, so there are not really any winners or stinkers among their products.  Switchers might use shorter motors, but my experience is that they operate the same as the larger locos.

Can't speak to how other companies do it.

 

 

 

When did this word legacy get this extra meaning? So what if the design of the drive is "old", if it still works well, it still works.

I hear people use this word in this way all the time now, like it is some politically correct word for obsolete?

I don't get it?

Sheldon

 

 

"Legacy" just connotes something desirable enough to keep using but not made currently. Usually hasn't been made for a long time and nobody expects production to resume. Generally in model railroading legacy equipment is DC only.

In the case of any Rapido products, they cannot achieve legacy status as yet because nobody can tell when Jason will build another run of whatever, not even Jason.  

Alyth Yard

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Posted by Doughless on Sunday, May 2, 2021 2:11 PM

ATLANTIC CENTRAL

 

 
Doughless

There is also the school of thought where you buy the kind of loco that runs well, sounds well, and lights well, and then whatever body configuration covers the mechanism adjust the model railroad to accomodate.  Only model the locos of the railroad that operate well as models.

But that's becoming moot.

Atlas, Walthers, and ATHG locos all use their proprietary drivetrains in each of their product lines (Athearn RTR is legacy).  No matter what diesel they build, the motor, trucks, and electronics are the same from loco to loco, so there are not really any winners or stinkers among their products.  Switchers might use shorter motors, but my experience is that they operate the same as the larger locos.

Can't speak to how other companies do it.

 

 

 

When did this word legacy get this extra meaning? So what if the design of the drive is "old", if it still works well, it still works.

I hear people use this word in this way all the time now, like it is some politically correct word for obsolete?

I don't get it?

Sheldon

 

 

Mike basically explained it.  It simply means that a company is selling the new engineered product when the old engineered product still works fine.  

If you say old, it sounds outdated, or worn out.  Legacy generally means that it functions well, its just was designed prior to the new stuff.

Frankly, the legacy motor (the BB motore) and updated drivetrain in the ATH RTR products are smoother and quieter than the new Genesis motor, so I prefer the legacy over the new.

Specifically for DCC/Sound, the athearn motor is powered by a wire that runs from the light board down to the bottom motor clip, and the light board clips onto the brass/clip that rides along top of the traditional athearn motor. The board has a 21 pin plug where the Soundtraxx Econami decoder plugs into.  Power comes from wires from the trucks up to the board.

You'd recognize the BB motor and the top clip.  

And I think they may have tweeked the design of the armature, because the motor runs very quiet with none of the typical BB motor growl.

Maybe "traditional" is a better word than Legacy, because I don't think ATH plans to stop making those motors.

- Douglas

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Posted by PRR8259 on Sunday, May 2, 2021 4:00 PM

Doughless

There is also the school of thought where you buy the kind of loco that runs well, sounds well, and lights well, and then whatever body configuration covers the mechanism adjust the model railroad to accomodate.  Only model the locos of the railroad that operate well as models.

But that's becoming moot.

Atlas, Walthers, and ATHG locos all use their proprietary drivetrains in each of their product lines (Athearn RTR is legacy).  No matter what diesel they build, the motor, trucks, and electronics are the same from loco to loco, so there are not really any winners or stinkers among their products.  Switchers might use shorter motors, but my experience is that they operate the same as the larger locos.

Can't speak to how other companies do it.

To clarify:  I actually agree with much of what Douglas said here.

I've searched and tried a whole lot of engines, and I finally found some that I think really make me happy:  the Bowser SD40-2 and actually the MTH 2-8-8-4 (pity it's the last HO offering from MTH).

There are other Bowser engines for sure.  Most of them run very well indeed.  I simply chose the one unit that most closely meets my needs or desires, and am running with that particular unit, even to the point of acquiring rolling stock that fits well with the SD40-2 Survivors series of videos.

It's the right model at the right time, for which the right rolling stock became available for me (from multiple manufacturers).  I am able to have leaser units, secondhand units like IC&E units and still remaining CP units, and to mix them together, and really nobody can say that I'm doing anything non-prototypical or incorrect, that can't or wasn't happening on real railroads in the last few years.

That doesn't make other Bowser units "inferior" in any way.  There are Athearn Genesis units that are just fine, but just aren't available in the particular body type I wanted...same with some other makes.

The performance in dcc can be more than adequate in many different models.

John

  • Member since
    May 2019
  • 137 posts
Posted by TheFlyingScotsman on Sunday, May 2, 2021 4:32 PM

I have:

Athearn

Key Imports

Intermountain

MTH

Kato

P2K

PSC

Overland

Broadway Limited

If I had to pick a diesel model that I feel is better than all others it would definately be Kato, not that I have had too much bad luck although I did once have an Atlas about 15 years ago that I took the motor from and used as a dummy. For what reason I do not recollect.

I have had steam and diesel from BLI and thank goodness have been OK for me.

MTH likewise which get a bad vibe here and elsewhere at times I find very good.

If I had an observation to make here it is that the manufacturers are very very lucky that this is a game of tinkerers who are usualy pretty good at what they do and so overcome issues themselves without returning locos to the factory quite often. If folk had the issues with their phone or TV that come out of the woodwork with even some of the pretty expensive locomotives they woud be less enamoured.

  • Member since
    January 2009
  • From: Maryland
  • 10,714 posts
Posted by ATLANTIC CENTRAL on Sunday, May 2, 2021 8:18 PM

OK, because I don't keep close tabs on all this stuff anymore, I was unaware that Athearn seems to have finally stopped producing many or all of the RTR locos that were based on the BlueBox locos.

I guess I can call my garden tractor "legacy", they have not been made since 2002, and were still based on a core design from 1971, and it will drag around backwards most of the competition, then and now.

As for Mike's comment about DC being "legacy", last new loco offerings I did look at, Rapido, Walthers, Athearn and others are still listing DC versions (called DCC ready)?

Sheldon

    

  • Member since
    January 2017
  • From: Southern Florida Gulf Coast
  • 12,595 posts
Posted by SeeYou190 on Sunday, May 2, 2021 8:30 PM

My old employer had very strict rules where the term "legacy" was to be applied to a product in current production.

Earlier, if the cylinder head capscrew threads in the engine block were SAE sized, and not metric, it was a legacy engine platform.

This caused some concern among customers, because our 60 liter engines had 3/4" Fine Thread on the cylinder head capscrews, thus it was a legacy engine, and that would not fly.

The rules were changed and became so complicated that most of it seemed self-contradictory.

So, I just stopped using the word "legacy" when describing our products.

Oh... the new Walthers flyer came in the mail today... The NW2 is being offered DC and Undecorated. I am going to buy one. And, the Kato GP-38 DC Undecorated has a good sale price right now.

-Kevin

Wink Happily modeling my STRATTON & GILLETTE RAILROAD. A Class A line located in a personal fantasy world of semi-plausible nonsense on Tuesday, August 3rd, 1954.

  • Member since
    January 2009
  • From: Maryland
  • 10,714 posts
Posted by ATLANTIC CENTRAL on Sunday, May 2, 2021 8:44 PM

SeeYou190

My old employer had very strict rules where the term "legacy" was to be applied to a product in current production.

Earlier, if the cylinder head capscrew threads in the engine block were SAE sized, and not metric, it was a legacy engine platform.

This caused some concern among customers, because our 60 liter engines had 3/4" Fine Thread on the cylinder head capscrews, thus it was a legacy engine, and that would not fly.

The rules were changed and became so complicated that most of it seemed self-contradictory.

So, I just stopped using the word "legacy" when describing our products.

-Kevin

 

I see it as just another pointless euphemism to water down the facts and confuse definitions.

I have heard it used by Canadians regarding old/historic houses? As if it is a government sanctioned term?

The US architectural/historic preservation community does not use it. We are rather proud of the fact that our old houses are "old", and some are "historic".

We don't need a euphemism for it. The big blue house I just sold is now 120 years "old", and still doing very well, with its original slate roof and all.

My new spot is not "new", but not all that old yet at only 57.

Sheldon

 

    

  • Member since
    June 2020
  • 2,233 posts
Posted by Lastspikemike on Sunday, May 2, 2021 11:47 PM

ATLANTIC CENTRAL

OK, because I don't keep close tabs on all this stuff anymore, I was unaware that Athearn seems to have finally stopped producing many or all of the RTR locos that were based on the BlueBox locos.

I guess I can call my garden tractor "legacy", they have not been made since 2002, and were still based on a core design from 1971, and it will drag around backwards most of the competition, then and now.

As for Mike's comment about DC being "legacy", last new loco offerings I did look at, Rapido, Walthers, Athearn and others are still listing DC versions (called DCC ready)?

Sheldon

 

They call them DCC ready but they won't run on DC without a dummy plug to jumper the decoder connections. So, no, they aren't DC locomotives. They're DCC locomotives with the decoders removed. 

Around here we have Heritage buildings. They're just old buildings people are fond of so we keep using  them. People get upset when we knock them down. Some "Heritage" buildings are kept because it's just too expensive to knock them down. Some of those old buildings are "preserved" because we have no choice.

We use "legacy" to describe infrastructure that we'd like to replace or upgrade but can't afford to so we modify the new stuff to work with the old stuff. Same idea as fitting a dummy plug.

Alyth Yard

Canada

  • Member since
    March 2016
  • 1,272 posts
Posted by PRR8259 on Monday, May 3, 2021 12:35 AM

I am told by one manufacturer that full dcc locos are outselling "dcc ready" locos by at least a rate of 55% to 45%, with the dcc side generally increasing all the time.

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