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A Word About Acrylic Model Paints

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  • Member since
    December 2003
  • From: Good ol' USA
  • 9,536 posts
Posted by AntonioFP45 on Wednesday, June 8, 2016 10:43 PM

Forgot to mention that for weathering, I now use acrylics only. Since I sometimes will "over do it" accidentally, I enjoy having the ability of being able to simply wash off the acrylic paint. 

Weathering washes, for me, are fun to experiment with and apply via paint brush or airbrush. Although I do a lot of paint jobs with airbrushes, my preference has been to weather my rolling stock using paint brushes dipped into thin wash mixes. It's neat seeing gravity and capillary action taking place and help provide a nice effect.

"I like my Pullman Standards & Budds in Stainless Steel flavors, thank you!"

 


  • Member since
    November 2006
  • From: NW Pa Snow-belt.
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Posted by ricktrains4824 on Tuesday, June 7, 2016 12:58 PM

ricktrains4824

I am, now, thanks to another project, starting to use craft paint, found a  1/5 water/paint mix, with a drop or two of flow aid, sprays well at around 35-40psi, slightly thinner works well at around 30-35psi, and covers well, goes on thin and doesn't obscure details. 

 

Wow.... Don't know what I was thinking with that one.... It should be 60/40 paint/water ratio, with a drop or two of flow aid.....

Ricky W.

HO scale Proto-freelancer.

My Railroad rules:

1: It's my railroad, my rules.

2: It's for having fun and enjoyment.

3: Any objections, consult above rules.

  • Member since
    February 2013
  • 479 posts
Posted by HObbyguy on Tuesday, June 7, 2016 5:04 AM

I missed out on the Floquil/Polly-Scale days since I've only been at this for a few years now, and my airbrushing experience is entirely with acrylics.  But I'll second the value of using a battery-powered mixer.  Quick and easy, no need to strain the paint, and I don't think I've had a clog in my airbrush once since using the little mixer.  After mixing paint I dip the mixer in a cup of water and give it a whir, then wipe off the shaft with a paper towel.  All clean and ready to mix again.

Huntington Junction - Freelance based on the B&O and C&O in coal country before the merger...  doing it my way.  Now working on phase 3.      - Walt

For photos and more:  http://www.wkhobbies.com/model-railroad/

  • Member since
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  • From: Duluth, MN
  • 424 posts
Posted by OT Dean on Tuesday, June 7, 2016 12:56 AM

Antonio, I'm not surprised you had trouble with Poly-x; I always thought it was a type of latex paint and never used it except with a brush (never even thought of spraying it). 

Ricky, I preferred Polly-Scale and had laid in a good supply of it: at least two bottles of each color, one to go into the 2oz bottles I got from Michael's to give me room to thin it and the other one for brushing.  It grieved me that I lost all the thinned paint due to those lousy inner cap seals--and then found Testors had dropped the entire Floquil line!

One of the things I noticed right away was that when I brushed Model Flex to cover up botched spots on my brass snowplow blade, you couldn't tell it had been done!  In the old days, using Floquil lacquers, the brush-painted patches always came out flatter and therefore lighter-looking.

BTW, I've been meaning to mention this before: I no longer stir and shake paint before using.  I bought one of those handy little battery-powered pain mixers.  Guys, they really work!  The paint is thoroughly mixed, plus you don't end up with gummy paint under the lid.  It's the best eleven bucks I ever spent--I think (I used to have a lousy memory; now I have NO memory!)

Deano

  • Member since
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  • From: NW Pa Snow-belt.
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Posted by ricktrains4824 on Monday, June 6, 2016 7:21 PM

My go-to paint choice is Modelflex. For some jobs I thin it slightly, usually a 1/5 water/paint ratio, but for most, just strain it before airbrushing. Washes are 50/50 mix. 

I am, now, thanks to another project, starting to use craft paint, found a 1/5 water/paint mix, with a drop or two of flow aid, sprays well at around 35-40psi, slightly thinner works well at around 30-35psi, and covers well, goes on thin and doesn't obscure details. 

Ricky W.

HO scale Proto-freelancer.

My Railroad rules:

1: It's my railroad, my rules.

2: It's for having fun and enjoyment.

3: Any objections, consult above rules.

  • Member since
    December 2003
  • From: Good ol' USA
  • 9,536 posts
Posted by AntonioFP45 on Monday, June 6, 2016 6:58 PM

Hello OT,

Thanks for sharing your experience. Big Smile

You were basically forced to switch to acrylics but the results turned out very positve. Good going. Thumbs Up

I admit to being very resistent to trying acrylics at first. Back in the 1980s I tried out "Polly S", which turned out to be disastrous for me.  However, during the 90s, a good friend of mine, who is an excellent painter, suggested that I try out "Polly Scale".  Skeptical, I gave it a go and was very surprised and satisfied with the results. The learning curve was not difficult at all. Keys to remember were: Slightly higher air pressure settings; flush it out immediately after using, and avoid spraying in humid conditions. Instead of thinning Polly Scale the recommended 10% to 15% with distilled water, I thin it approximately 20% with distilled water (no alcohol). For weathering I'll thin Polly Scale 50% to 70%.

Later I tried Badger's Modelflex and was impressed with it as well. Although I've read of modelers having to thin Modelflex for regular paint jobs, I haven't had to and get very smooth results. I just pour it in the cup and shoot away.

I sprayed the yellow on the bus with Modelflex. I was impressed with how quickly it dried and cured. It still needs decals and body details which I hope to get to this summer:

Over on the solvents side, whenever I have to spray a job that is primarily black or if I'm metalizing stainless steel passenger cars.....Scale Coat II is my preferred choice.

Currently I use both, solvent based and acrylic paints and like them. I always keep in mind their strengths and weaknesses when planning a job.

 

"I like my Pullman Standards & Budds in Stainless Steel flavors, thank you!"

 


  • Member since
    January 2015
  • From: Duluth, MN
  • 424 posts
A Word About Acrylic Model Paints
Posted by OT Dean on Monday, June 6, 2016 1:45 AM

"OT" in my user name means I'm an Old-Timer (dating back to the mid-'50s) and my introduction to the original Floquil dates from that time.  (It sold, in little square 1oz bottles, for 45 cents at that time.)  After I started airbrushing, I usually had two bottles of each color, one of 'em thinned with Diosol, the Floquil thinner.  I never thought the lacquer smell was objectionable--in fact, I rather got used to it and even kind of liked it--but when i was still living at home, Mom gave me the Evil Eye from time to time.

However, when I moved into an apartment in '96, I realized that using lacquer paints was probably a lease-breaker, so I looked into acrylics, reading the reviews in MR and RMC.  I even bought some  Floquil Polly-Scale paints, though I never got far enough along on any projects to actually use them.  But when I moved to my retirement digs, I vowed to finish all the half completed projects for which I was famous among my modeling friends.

I started collecting all the colors I thought I'd need, bought some 2oz bottles for thinned airbrushing paint, and got a few bottles of Model Flex, which was advertised as ready for brush or airbrush.  And that's what I used for my O scale copy of the Milwaukee Road gondola-mounted snowplow inspired by the late Paul Larson's article in the January, '57, MR.

I really liked the fact that I could do cleanup with grocery store alcohol and tapwater--and that's what I want to comment about.  I had read in one of the reviews that acrylics really stick, even on model diesel locomotive handrails, which usually are enough to make a grown man cry.  If you haven't used acrylics yet, I can tell you that it must stick to those flexible handrails, 'cuz I'm reminded of its adhesion ability every time I empty my black plastic dishpan, for there are a couple of spots of Model Flex #16-14 Light Tuscan Oxide Red (boxcar red, actually) still on that soft, flexible dishpan, from six years ago when I cleaned my airbrush!

Deano

UPDATE 1/22/17:

As mentioned above, while cleaning my airbrush after spraying boxcar red (actually, it was Badger Model Master #16-14 LIGHT TUSCAN OXIDE RED), I got a few specks of it on my black poly-plastic dishpan.  It's still there, after at least six years, and what I hadn't noticed ("EE": Elderly Eyesight) was a few specks on the stainless steel sink itself.

Sunday, January 22, I asked my cleaning helper to take Barkeeper's Friend to the sink---and doggone if the spots weren't still there when she left!  Thinking the cleanser might nbot have been up to the job, I took a new green scouring pad and BKF to work on it.  The spots are still there after applying much elbow grease.  Stainless steel!  3M green scouring pad AND Barkeeper's Friend!

The only word that seems adequate is French: Formidable!

Deano

 

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