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20's people

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  • Member since
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  • From: Canada
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Posted by wickman on Monday, November 30, 2015 11:08 PM

Thanks Dave . I just may have to bite the bullet and buy a hundred unpainted figures. I think if I can find them for around $1.50 a pc in the 30's era I would be doing good.

Anyone have some good suppliers?

Thanks

  • Member since
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  • From: Bradford, Ontario
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Posted by hon30critter on Monday, November 30, 2015 9:47 PM

Ed:

I checked out the Kadee fibre washers. Unfortunately they are too big. They might work if you were doing sombreros if you could figure out a way to curl the edge.

I just went through my washer inventory and I found some 4mm washers that are the perfect size. They are fibre to boot so shaping will be easy. Trouble is I can't remember where I got them.Dunce Digi-Key has a slightly larger washer available (4.75mm).

http://www.digikey.com/product-search/en/hardware-fasteners-accessories/washers/2097338?k=36-3111-ND

Note that the washer is .032" (.081 mm) thick which is not ideal.

Dave

I'm just a dude with a bad back having a lot of fun with model trains, and finally building a layout!

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Posted by wickman on Monday, November 30, 2015 6:02 PM

fieryturbo

 

 
wickman

Thanks , Yes I am quite willing to paint  my own miniatures. When I  googled Call of Cthulhu, I found many links but none that pointed to the individual peoples?

 

 

 
Sadly, I'm having some trouble finding them, though it looks like what I thought was 20mm (1/87) is actually 25-28mm, which is a bit oversized.
 
I was able to find 20mm gangsters, but that's it.
 
EDIT: Actually Preiser makes some of what you want:
 
 

Thanks, yes I have came across the preiser figures but really can't put out the $ for prepainted figures. I do now have a better understaind ing of what I should be looking for now. Just have to pinch the penny to make it go farther.

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Posted by fieryturbo on Monday, November 30, 2015 3:45 PM

wickman

Thanks , Yes I am quite willing to paint  my own miniatures. When I  googled Call of Cthulhu, I found many links but none that pointed to the individual peoples?

 
Sadly, I'm having some trouble finding them, though it looks like what I thought was 20mm (1/87) is actually 25-28mm, which is a bit oversized.
 
I was able to find 20mm gangsters, but that's it.
 
EDIT: Actually Preiser makes some of what you want:
 

Julian

Modeling Pre-WP merger UP (1974-81)

  • Member since
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  • From: Bakersfield, CA 93308
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Posted by RR_Mel on Monday, November 30, 2015 11:52 AM

wickman

 

Mel I have never really understood Blogs but when I got to the bottom of that first page and started clicking on the links I was amazed but also disappointed as I didn't come across any links of you painting the figures. Just kidding , totally enjoyed myself and will continue on.

 

 

 

 

Lynn
 
When Google did an upgrade to Blogger a couple of years ago I lost several post, painting figures was one of the ones I lost.
 
Thanks for the good words!
 
 
Mel
 
Modeling the early to mid 1950s SP in HO scale since 1951
 
My Model Railroad   
 
Bakersfield, California
 
I'm beginning to realize that aging is not for wimps.
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Posted by chutton01 on Monday, November 30, 2015 11:49 AM

A rather fun way to do research is to search online (you know where) for the early 2 reeler comedies from actors like Buster Keaton, Harold Lloyd, Laurel & Hardy, W.C. Fields, even Charlie Chaplin (before his ego got too big), and many others.

Assuming the film is set in then contemporary times, and not the Old West" or "Medieval" periods the producers of the era were quite fond of (although the Old West was kind of around in a fashion at the time of the pre-WWI movies), while the main characters may or may not reflect "common-man" fashions depending on the movie ("), the extras and other background people often do.

At the very least, when they do location outdoor scenes you get plenty of great vintage views of Los Angeles back when it was really cool (and yes, the "big red cars" of the Pacific Electric are everwhere in those scenes)...

  • Member since
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  • From: Canada
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Posted by wickman on Monday, November 30, 2015 11:42 AM

fieryturbo

If you are willing to paint your own miniatures, there are regular townsfolk that are mixed in with the "Call of Cthulhu" miniatures so popular with tabletop gamers.  Some are quite good and very detailed, and in a pulp-'20s style.

 

Thanks , Yes I am quite willing to paint  my own miniatures. When I  googled Call of Cthulhu, I found many links but none that pointed to the individual peoples?

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Posted by fieryturbo on Monday, November 30, 2015 11:26 AM

If you are willing to paint your own miniatures, there are regular townsfolk that are mixed in with the "Call of Cthulhu" miniatures so popular with tabletop gamers.  Some are quite good and very detailed, and in a pulp-'20s style.

Julian

Modeling Pre-WP merger UP (1974-81)

  • Member since
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  • From: Canada
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Posted by wickman on Monday, November 30, 2015 11:14 AM

Thanks again Dave for a great suggestion, although I do have many men  with  hats just not so  much Harrison Ford floppy hats and the  women not  so many with  the long dresses. lol I don't think I ever would  have came  up with the  idea to make hats , this  is very very creative.

 

Ed and  Jabear terrific links, I can recall  coming  across Shorpy's years ago but never would have thought of checking it out now, thanks.

 

Mel that is a most excellent idea for holding the little people. After painting close to 400 people I must say it shows, nice work. I really enjoyed your Blog and spent quite a bit of time on the memeory to John Allen link. I have always been a huge fan of John Allens work and always  make time for viewing.

 

Mel I have never really understood Blogs but when I got to the bottom of that first page and started clicking on the links I was amazed but also disappointed as I didn't come across any links of you painting the figures. Just kidding , totally enjoyed myself and will continue on.

 

So  guys so far I've gotten  some great ideas and good direction and I think it all got me thinking about myself and my layout. I look at my layout and what I have accomplished and although I realize I am not as dedicated as many with sticking to an  era I think I am going to have to become even more freelance on not only area I'm modelling but also quit kidding myself with what is actually correct. really the only thing that is making my layout 20's is the Jordans I will be building, the steam engines I run and the mostly wooden structures. Thanks for opening my eyes.

 

 

  • Member since
    January 2009
  • From: Bakersfield, CA 93308
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Posted by RR_Mel on Monday, November 30, 2015 8:42 AM

hon30critter

Lynn:

 

If your figures are not still on sprues I suggest gluing them feet first onto wood strips an inch or so apart so they can be held easily for painting. If they are still on sprues, leave them on until the painting is done.

 

Dave

 

Lynn
 
I agree with Dave, you need something to hold the figures while your painting them.  I use a small dab of Super Glue on a pin head and stick a foot or small area to the pin.  I stick the pin in a pencil eraser, the pencil makes it easy to turn the figure for painting.
 
I normally get into a figure painting mode and hang in there for a couple of hours.  I store the figures by sticking the pin in a strip of balsa, makes it easy to go back and fourth to change colors.
 
 
 
I use Crafters Acrylic Paints, there are hundreds of flat colors and water clean up.
 
Over several years I've painted close to 400 figures.
 
 
Mel
 
Modeling the early to mid 1950s SP in HO scale since 1951
 
My Model Railroad   
 
Bakersfield, California
 
I'm beginning to realize that aging is not for wimps.
  • Member since
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  • From: A Comfy Cave, New Zealand
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Posted by "JaBear" on Monday, November 30, 2015 4:39 AM
Shorpy comes to the rescue, or the Bear mudding the waters?
 
Cheers, the Bear.Smile
 EDIT: I see Eds beaten me to the punch.Smile, Wink & Grin

"One difference between pessimists and optimists is that while pessimists are more often right, optimists have far more fun."

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  • From: Collinwood, Ohio, USA
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Posted by gmpullman on Monday, November 30, 2015 4:34 AM

hon30critter
The boater hats could be easily modelled with a '0' washer and a bit of styrene tube. Washers could also be used to mimic the brim of a fedora by bending them a bit.

That's a good idea, Dave. I wonder if the Kadee #209 .010 fiber washers would work? The hole is probably larger but with a little Squadron putty then some sanding once everything dries might work?

Lynn,

I don't know if you are familiar with Shorpy? It is a fun and informative site that displays 2 or 3 new photos a day from archives of WPA, OWI, and Library Of Congress among others. There are thousands of photos that can be "blown-up" for better detail.

Here's a crowd scene where the gentlemen seem to be sporting quite a few boaters!

http://www.shorpy.com/node/12738?size=_original#caption

There are frequently photos posted that are of interest to modelers and railfans alike, especially some of the Jack Delano work. Take a browse, I think you'll like it.

Hope that helps, Ed

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  • From: Bradford, Ontario
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Posted by hon30critter on Monday, November 30, 2015 1:06 AM

Lynn:

If I can suggest, I think you should keep the task as simple as possible given the numbers of figures involved. Focus on the colours. Somehow I doubt that people will notice that not all the men are wearing hats. All you need in that regard is a few foreground figures with details like floppy fedoras. A simple splotch of colour on the ladies heads would suggest simple hat designs. That could be done easily for most of your female figures.

One other consideration is the actual paint that you use. I use Humbrol almost exclusively for painting figures because it always covers thoroughly in one coat. You don't want to do anymore touching up than you absolutely have to.

If your figures are not still on sprues I suggest gluing them feet first onto wood strips an inch or so apart so they can be held easily for painting. If they are still on sprues, leave them on until the painting is done.

Making men's hats quickly and easily still seems to be a challenge. I'll put my thinking cap on to see what I can come up with. I'm modelling in the late 50s but lots of men were still wearing hats then too.

Dave

I'm just a dude with a bad back having a lot of fun with model trains, and finally building a layout!

  • Member since
    August 2003
  • From: Canada
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Posted by wickman on Monday, November 30, 2015 12:43 AM
Thanks Tom I had found the same googling.
Dave you basicly filled in the holes and confirmed with the darker colors, floppy hats etc. Sounds like men with no hats were seldom seen but again perhaps someone simply hanging out would where different clothes and less stylish dresses. I somehow have to make this work with the vast amount of unpainted figures I have.
  • Member since
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  • From: Bradford, Ontario
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Posted by hon30critter on Monday, November 30, 2015 12:26 AM

Hi Lynn:

The following is purely my own opinion based on what I have seen in pictures from the era, so don't shoot me if I get something wrong.

One thing I think you have to recognize is that ladies fashions changed significantly from 1920 to 1939. In 1920 there would still be remnents of the full length dress style with numerous layers of under garments to fill the dress out. By the mid 20's 'flappers' were wearing practically nothing underneath by comparison, and the general public was wearing much simpler garments with shorter hems. Women would not often be seen in public in slacks.

Men's fashions changed less but colours got somewhat more varied and some hat styles went out of vogue.

I think clothing colour is one key factor. Bright colours were relatively rare so most people would be in browns, blacks, dark grays, with black being predominent in 1920. The exception might be people who were on their way to or from sporting events, expositions etc. Light coloured jackets and pants were common for men on those occasions. However, I think the popularity of the light coloured suits died out in the early 30s (what didn't die out - it was the Great Depression).

You are right about men wearing hats. Fedoras were the most popular (think Harrison Ford in Raiders of the Lost Arc) but flat brimmed straw boater hats were in style for less formal occasions, often for men dressed in the aformentioned light coloured suits (think barber shop quartet). The majority of men wore hats in public especially if they were in business suits. The boater hats could be easily modelled with a '0'  (Edit - the best size for HO is 4mm) washer and a bit of styrene tube. Washers could also be used to mimic the brim of a fedora by bending them a bit. I would use brass washers. They will be easier to bend.

Women also wore hats in significant numbers. In the early 20s the hats were still rather large but by the late 20s that trend was on its way out.

One thing I can say for sure is that the colours used on most figures imported from the far east are absolutely out to lunch, regardless of the era!

My 2 Cents

Yes, "Colours" with a 'u' - I'm Canadian eh!

Dave

I'm just a dude with a bad back having a lot of fun with model trains, and finally building a layout!

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Posted by tstage on Sunday, November 29, 2015 11:38 PM

Lynn,

Men wore suits and ties and hats - even to baseball games.  Women wore very stylish dresses.

I just did a Google image search on "clothing of the 1920s and 1930s" and came up with this:

https://www.google.com/search?safe=active&hl=en&site=imghp&tbm=isch&source=hp&biw=1760&bih=875&q=clothing+of+the+1920s+and+1930s&oq=clothing+of+the+1920s&gs_l=img.1.1.0j0i30j0i5i10i30j0i5i30j0i8i30l2.3285.10463.0.13021.27.21.1.0.0.0.501.2527.0j9j2j1j0j1.13.0....0...1ac.1.64.img..14.13.2339.2SuXzBOfjB4

Perhaps that will help...

Tom

https://tstage9.wixsite.com/nyc-modeling

Time...It marches on...without ever turning around to see if anyone is even keeping in step.

  • Member since
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  • From: Canada
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20's people
Posted by wickman on Sunday, November 29, 2015 11:30 PM

Hi everyone, I have a couple hundred assorted figures but really not sure if they cab be made to fit into 20's 30's era I'm modeling. What makes for older era characters? I know back then the men wore a certain type of hat and women at least I think wore longer dresses maybe. So how do you's deal with your eras for people ? Is it clothing color, pick skinny compared to heavier people or how? I'm really not financially able to purchase all new figures as it is a large layout with many scenes. 

Thanks

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