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Blower for Homemade Paint Booth

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Blower for Homemade Paint Booth
Posted by peahrens on Monday, July 28, 2014 5:27 PM

I think I will build my own paint booth and hope someone can point me at any better blower option than what I have found so far.  I will build a moderate size booth, a moveable box and it will exhaust to the outside through the wall, connecting from the booth to the wall with flex ducting. 

I just did my first airbrush project on some passenger car re-do's, using Badger acrylic paints, and lots of denatured alcohol as cleaner.  I envision using the booth more often with rattle cans, primers and such on structures which I usually hand paint with craft acrylics.  So my objective is to exhaust things like alcohol spray vapors and rattle can lacquers and enamels where I'm not breathing them.  And I've decided to use a safe blower from an ignition standpoint, with the motor external to the airflow.  That leads me away from the cheaper paint booths that are for non-flammable vapors, and the squirrel cage blowers seem to be the way to go.  I want 120v, not 12v. 

So, I've decided I can build a safe booth (probably thin plywood) if i can find the right fan and get it connected to the wall.  The fan can be either on the booth or the wall, with removeable ducting from the work bench.

Now, about the fan options.  My priorities are (1) safety from a flammability standpoint, (2) relatively low noise, (3) relatively easy to make ductwork connections and (4) price. I don't think it needs even as much cfm as a bath fan, but more is ok if not noisy, large, etc.  I've come across this one and welcome comments on that or a better alternative.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000BK43IY?ie=UTF8&action=selectNewCardDeactivatedCC&refRID=1AC3TQC7911QS6Q58B6R&ref_=pd_sim_sbs_lg_3

Thank, as always!  

Paul

Modeling HO with a transition era UP bent

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Posted by maxman on Monday, July 28, 2014 5:53 PM

I used the one recommended in MR.  The article was "The Paint Shop Spray Booth", January 1988.  That article also showed how to construct the booth.

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Posted by crhostler61 on Monday, July 28, 2014 5:54 PM

I built a spray booth a few years ago and it works quite well. I got a centrifugar blower off of a small boiler that was scrapped during my time with a former employer. It's about 1/6 hp and has a duct opening about 2.5 inches square. I set that up with plastic downspout parts and flexible dryer duct to vent outside through a window. The blower is a 6 " squirrel cage that's spun with an induction motor so there's no brushes to create sparks. 

Take a look at some of those fans Wal Mart sells, I recall seeing a few different types of smaller centifugal blower fans that could work for a spray booth with some slick arrangement of fittings.

Mark H

Modeling in HO...Reading and Conrail together in an alternate history. 

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Posted by richg1998 on Monday, July 28, 2014 6:14 PM

If you ever fall over in public, pick yourself up and say “sorry it’s been a while since I inhabited a body.” And just walk away.

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Posted by Mark R. on Monday, July 28, 2014 6:39 PM

I used a squirrel cage blower from an old portable clothes drier (it was free) and has been working for over twenty years.

I built my booth out of plywood and lined the interior with thin sheet aluminum (old printing plates, again - free) which makes clean-up a breeze.

Mark.

¡ uʍop ǝpısdn sı ǝɹnʇɐuƃıs ʎɯ 'dlǝɥ

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Posted by doctorwayne on Monday, July 28, 2014 7:17 PM

I built my spray booth from stuff which I hand on-hand:  some Masonite sheets for the sides and top, assembled using leftover wall-angle from a suspend ceiling and some pop rivets.   The bottom is 3/4" plywood which was formerly the top of a no-longer-needed small table.  I used a fan from an air hockey game (in a box of similar fans about to be tossed at my wife's place of employment) and installed it in a floor-register plenum.  The photo below shows plastic dryer duct (which served well for over 20 years) but it's since been replaced with rigid aluminum duct.
I built a filter holder from scrap 1"x2", and sized it to accept one half of a standard fibreglass-type furnace filter.  I also installed a manually-operated turntable on the floor of the booth, but used it only once.  The only item purchased was the sheet metal plenum.
Contrary to common wisdom, mine places the fan in the plenum and is in the top of the booth.  In over 35 years of use, including commercial painting for others, never a problem with dirt falling on the freshly painted models.
I should note that my paint room is not used for any other purpose, so it's a relatively clean environment - ideal for painting.  While the room is fairly tight to prevent dirt and pest incursion, it does  have a screened (and closeable) opening to allow for make-up air to replace that exhausted by the fan.


Wayne

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Posted by jeffrey-wimberly on Monday, July 28, 2014 7:19 PM

Don't do what I did. I used a blower fan from an old range hood and found myself putting out the latest design in impromptu flame throwers. Luckily I had a fire extinguisher there for just such an eventuality.

Running Bear, Sundown, Louisiana
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Posted by Schuylkill and Susquehanna on Monday, July 28, 2014 8:34 PM

I used a 6" vent fan from the local Home Depot.  In retrospect I should have used the highes flow rate fan they had that fit a 6" duct (I went with the 2nd highest which was about 2/3 the flow).  The airflow is adequate, but not optimal.  I used a 6" round duct to 6x12 rectangular duct adapter to hook the fan up to the back of the booth.

S&S

 

Modeling the Pennsy and loving it!

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Posted by MJ4562 on Tuesday, July 29, 2014 7:13 AM

jeffrey-wimberly
Don't do what I did. I used a blower fan from an old range hood and found myself putting out the latest design in impromptu flame throwers. Luckily I had a fire extinguisher there for just such an eventuality.

I always wondered if that was an old wive's tale Smile or a sales pitch.

What are the requirements for safe blower fan in a spray booth?

 

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Posted by jrbernier on Tuesday, July 29, 2014 8:26 AM

  My original paint booth used a 30" range vent hood and 3/4" plywood, vented to the outside.  This was back in the era of solvent based paint(Floquil and Scalecoat).  I always made sure I started the fan before air brushing, and never had a problem with fire/explosion.  My current spray booth is a Micro-Mark 'portable' that was on sale for $99.  It has a blower fan that is enclosed and is powered by 12v 'wall wart' power source.  Most of my painting now uses acrylic paints.  The unit has a media filter and a turntable, but no lamp.

http://www.micromark.com/fold-up-spray-booth,11594.html

Fold-Up Spray Booth

Jim

Modeling BNSF  and Milwaukee Road in SW Wisconsin

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Posted by jeffrey-wimberly on Tuesday, July 29, 2014 8:37 AM

MJ4562

 

 
jeffrey-wimberly
Don't do what I did. I used a blower fan from an old range hood and found myself putting out the latest design in impromptu flame throwers. Luckily I had a fire extinguisher there for just such an eventuality.

 

I always wondered if that was an old wive's tale Smile or a sales pitch.

What are the requirements for safe blower fan in a spray booth?

 

 

A sealed motor is a BIG plus. No possibility of sparks that could ignite fumes.

Running Bear, Sundown, Louisiana
          Joined June, 2004

Dr. Frankendiesel aka Scott Running Bear
Space Mouse for president!
15 year veteran fire fighter
Collector of Apple //e's
Running Bear Enterprises
History Channel Club life member.
beatus homo qui invenit sapientiam


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Posted by modelmaker51 on Tuesday, July 29, 2014 9:10 AM

My booth was made from scrap plywood with a bathroom fan mounted in back which was hooked up to a flexible dryer hose which is vented outdoors.

The bathroom fan is brushless (which they must be by code) so no danger of sparks and cost me $15. It is capable of 110 cfm which is plenty. It's been doing it's job for 20 years now.

In the photo to left of the booth I have a shelf on which I keep a jug of distilled water (the type with the spigot) under which is a plastic tub I use for rinsing the airbrush. To the left of that is my drying oven which uses a couple of 100W lightbulbs on a dimmer.

 

Jay 

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Posted by BroadwayLion on Tuesday, July 29, 2014 9:25 AM

LION has lots sof small 12v fans leftover from old computers. Problem is that the air flow passes right over the fan and will foul up the motor even if it does not catch fire. What you need is any sort of a fan, the electronics of wich are outside of the air flow. skuril cages do this. others do too. Visit an old motor / fan / compressor repair store and see what the guy has, and what he wants for it. You may find a bargain.

As for me, I do not spray enough paint, and only acrylic, to be bothered with more than a closed cardboard box.

Besides, as a cat, I do not want to go anywhere near a spay box.

 

ROAR

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Posted by gmpullman on Tuesday, July 29, 2014 4:26 PM

Hi, Paul

This is the fan I used and I was quite pleased with the results.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B005XNNYMU/ref=ox_sc_sfl_title_6?ie=UTF8&psc=1&smid=A2VCOZMMU5A8B1

The ductwork connections were particularly easy at 6" in and 6" out.

This is the outside damper/vent I used and I got a 6" round to 3-1/2 x 10 adapter from Home Depot.

http://www.amazon.com/Broan-639-Black-Damper-Enamel/dp/B000BQRHNQ/ref=sr_1_5?s=hi&ie=UTF8&qid=1406669029&sr=1-5&keywords=broan+vent+cap

Remember, for best practices you should have the fan closest to the outdoors and the suction line continuing to the paint hood. Almost all exhaust fans are mounted on the roof of buildings this way if there are any leaks in the duct work the fumes and dust are not expelled into the building.

Hope this helps, Ed

 

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Posted by bogp40 on Tuesday, July 29, 2014 5:28 PM

gmpullman

Hi, Paul

This is the fan I used and I was quite pleased with the results.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B005XNNYMU/ref=ox_sc_sfl_title_6?ie=UTF8&psc=1&smid=A2VCOZMMU5A8B1

The ductwork connections were particularly easy at 6" in and 6" out.

This is the outside damper/vent I used and I got a 6" round to 3-1/2 x 10 adapter from Home Depot.

http://www.amazon.com/Broan-639-Black-Damper-Enamel/dp/B000BQRHNQ/ref=sr_1_5?s=hi&ie=UTF8&qid=1406669029&sr=1-5&keywords=broan+vent+cap

Remember, for best practices you should have the fan closest to the outdoors and the suction line continuing to the paint hood. Almost all exhaust fans are mounted on the roof of buildings this way if there are any leaks in the duct work the fumes and dust are not expelled into the building.

Hope this helps, Ed

 

 

Ed, The "duct/ booster" fan is a great idea, I haven't used them for a spraybooth only to provide heat/ AC to remote areas.  The exhuast hood also is axailable in 6, 7 and 8" round. Use these for kitchen hoods where the transition can't be made.  You're right about fan placement, these fans work better when they draw, rather than "push". If transitioning duck sizes you should usually run from small to larger at the fan. This increases the velocity from the hood rather than "slowing/ jamming" the airflow if reduced before exiting.

Regardless of what fan is used, it needs to be "brushless" as mentioned if not a sealed/ explosion proof design (extremely pricey). Don't use a plastic flex, try to use as much rigid pipe as possible in conjuction w/ the aluminum flex or rigid elbows. By keeping the fan a distance from the booth, less paint will contaminate the blades/ motor as well as alow a neg pressure draw. Any duct sections can be removed for cleaning. Foil "duct" tape will ensure a good seal,  easily cut and any screws removed for any future dissassembly.

Modeling B&O- Chessie  Bob K.  www.ssmrc.org

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Posted by peahrens on Tuesday, July 29, 2014 7:03 PM

Thanks for the comments and ideas.  Jeffery's experience with the flammability issue reinforces for me that (since planning to use alcohols & solvent based paints) that when I get around to building a booth I will not use a fan with the motor in the airflow.  It's more than a theoretical issue.  I'll lean for now towards a small squirrel cage blower. 

Today I was doing non-RR items (fence parts, in the printer box "booth") with Rustoleum primer and paint in the garage.  Two garage doors open, box fan working and side door open and still of course too much exposure.  Shouda done it outside with the box on the garbage can.  But that's not where I want to prime/paint my RR structures.

Paul

Modeling HO with a transition era UP bent

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