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Painting Unfinished Details

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  • Member since
    January 2021
  • 212 posts
Painting Unfinished Details
Posted by Attuvian1 on Saturday, July 30, 2022 12:10 PM

Is it either necessary or common practice to "wash" small details before painting? The question is particularly geared toward things like ladders, rungs, stirrups, grated roofwalks, eyebolts, lift bars, stanchions, railings and the like.  I've got the notion that because of the small diameters involved, exposure to handling makes them more susceptible to wear, particularly if they were painted over any manufacturing process residue (oils, grime, dust, etc.).

What are some specific techniques for handling/securing them during the process?

Another factor has to do with the "thinness" of the paint used.  I tend to be unimpressed by an otherwise nicely detailed caboose whose railings and grabs are gooped up.  Heavy paint jobs can increase a wire diameter noticeably.

Finally, I note that some parts (eyebolts, for instance), sometimes come pre-blackened.  What process is used to do so?  Are there user appliable "inks" or washes that are alternates to paint?

Thanks, guys.  Hope this is not too many questions for a single post.

John

  • Member since
    January 2017
  • From: Southern Florida Gulf Coast
  • 15,875 posts
Posted by SeeYou190 on Saturday, July 30, 2022 1:02 PM

Attuvian1
Is it either necessary or common practice to "wash" small details before painting?

I don't know about necessary or common. I don't do that. I prime these parts with a thin coat of flat black.

Attuvian1
What are some specific techniques for handling/securing them during the process?

All my little detail parts are added by me either as kit parts or upgrades. I only have two "ready to run" freight cars in my collection. I glue all the add-on details in place using Loctite Gel Control Super Glue.

Attuvian1
Another factor has to do with the "thinness" of the paint used

For the priming, I apply thinned flat black with a airbrush thinned two parts paint to one part thinner. Most parts are coated with the main spray of body colour paint. For detail painting I use Vallejo brand paints that I always thin before using. I just add a drop or two to the pallett.

Attuvian1
Finally, I note that some parts (eyebolts, for instance), sometimes come pre-blackened.  What process is used to do so?

I have no idea.

Attuvian1
Are there user appliable "inks" or washes that are alternates to paint?

For "inks" I like the Daler-Rowney brand. For "washes" I prefer those made by Citadel. Neither is an effective alternative to paint. I use inks to shift the color of paint and for heavy shadow effects. I use washes to darken lower layers and alter shadow effects.

Attuvian1
Hope this is not too many questions for a single post.

Not at all.

-Kevin

Living the dream and happily modeling my STRATTON AND GILLETTE Railroad in HO scale. The SGRR is a freelanced Class A railroad as it would have appeared on Tuesday, August 3rd, 1954, in my personal fantasy world of plausible nonsense.

  • Member since
    January 2004
  • From: Canada, eh?
  • 12,839 posts
Posted by doctorwayne on Saturday, July 30, 2022 1:24 PM

Attuvian1
Finally, I note that some parts (eyebolts, for instance), sometimes come pre-blackened. What process is used to do so?

Some metals (brass, copper, phosphor-bronze & steel can be chemically blackened) but I don't think that it will work on stainless steel.
There were (and maybe still are) blackening agents offered by Hobby Black and A-West Blacken-It, but I've also found that gun-blue will give similar results on some of those metals.
I've used all of the three ones mentioned, but it most cases, use it mostly to blacken or rust scrap metal loads for gondolas...

Most of those scrap loads are mixed metals, hence the variety of colours.
If you wish to simply blacken items made from brass, phosphor-bronze or copper, it might work better as a blackener if each type of material is subjected to the blackener separately.  For faster blackening, use very fine sandpaper to remove any tarnish.

Wayne

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