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Is there any model mold kits for making people when you need lots of people?

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  • Member since
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Is there any model mold kits for making people when you need lots of people?
Posted by anglecock on Sunday, July 17, 2022 11:41 AM

What gets me about most model railroads is the lack of people, I mean think about it somebody has the do all the work and eat and consume on these little empires..

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Posted by Overmod on Monday, July 18, 2022 12:27 PM

Please, somebody who knows Mel Perry's family, have them save everything related to his figures, and license them to be made.

I don't know anyone who built out that combination of wit and skill better.

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Posted by chutton01 on Monday, July 18, 2022 2:45 PM

Overmod
Please, somebody who knows Mel Perry's family, have them save everything related to his figures, and license them to be made.


Licensing could be an issue with that idea:
RR_Mel - Sept 2020
I started out making molds of Preiser figures then chopping off and reposition heads, arms and legs.  I then make molds of the repositioned figures.  I wanted to have some nice looking ladies and there just isn’t many in HO scale so I bought a few bald female HO figures off Shapewasy (very pricy) and did the same with them.

So his figures, albiet modified to various degrees, were made from molds based off of available commercial castings. OK IMO if you are making them for your own non-commercial usage, but trying to make money off of them without a license could be very iffy - didn't "Big Dawg Originals" get busted for selling locomotive castings molded from other manufacturers with minimal changes?

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Posted by xboxtravis7992 on Monday, July 18, 2022 2:47 PM

The easiest way to build up figures cheap is with unpainted figure pacts. They are a bit basic, but you can get sometimes a hundred or more figures in one purchase. Just look up unpainted figure pacts up on eBay or Amazon.

Woodland Scenics is the most common at a hobby shop, but they are pre-painted and very pricey.

As for how many figures you need, it really depends on a location. At a busy urban center, yeah you need massive crowds. But an industrial district? A couple people heading out to their cars at the end of their shift, a few taking a break outside, etc. is all you really need. Rural areas? A single farmer or two standing in their field, etc. The human mind is great at imagining what is not seen, and showing a couple people about is often enough to convince the viewer that there is life happening "elsewhere" beyond their vision. Empty cars, empty bikes, and all that give visual eye tricks to suggest people who were there but are currently unseen. 

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Posted by richhotrain on Monday, July 18, 2022 2:57 PM

This very same topic was the subject of a recent July thread.

https://cs.trains.com/mrr/f/88/t/292803.aspx

Mel made his figures using Alumilite resin casting materials. First, he made the molds using using commercially available figures as masters. Then, he made dozens of the same figures in these molds.

There is really nothing to license here. 

Rich

Alton Junction

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Posted by chutton01 on Monday, July 18, 2022 3:46 PM

xboxtravis7992
The easiest way to build up figures cheap is with unpainted figure pacts. They are a bit basic, but you can get sometimes a hundred or more figures in one purchase. Just look up unpainted figure pacts up on eBay or Amazon.

Woodland Scenics is the most common at a hobby shop, but they are pre-painted and very pricey.


What I have done in the past for vehicles, buses and passenger rail cars is use the 1:100 figures off of Amazon sellers (yes ~12% smaller than they should be in HO but that just means they fit in most vehicles with no or mininal surgery to squeeze them in.  Convertibles...meh, I have few and pose them as parked). Anyway these figures all needed to be repainted as I don't model 1970s variety shows so gold lame jackets and silver pants are right out. Flat basic colors followed by a dark wash and then dull coating is good enough, although stripping the paint was ineffective with these so I primed and repainted, and the results were...passable.

Now a few posts back I was rambling about reselling figures from RR_Mel's molds (which were made from other commerical firms IP) running into licensing issues. Well, xbox suggestion of HO figures from eBay got me to wondering what was available there.  Turns out the first couple of hits were of knock-off castings made using the figures from Presier unpainted sets  - I know those sets (I have figures from 3 of them - the 60+/120 figures kits - great sets but a bit dated to the 1980s with too many male figures in ties and most women figures in skirts as opposed to pants - maybe they have newer sets with more current figures) - and readily recognized at least 6 or seven figures in the "knock-off" sets - I gather eBay may not be all that worried about Presier's IP.


As for Woodland Scenics figures, while IMO they seem to be molded a little  'cartoony', as for the paint jobs (I brought a few sets over the years hoping to repaint them to make them more 'realistic' - but from an email I sent to Woodland several years ago I got this response:

Thank you for your purchase of Woodland Scenics Products.  We have not had the need to strip the paint off our Accent Models, so we have not tested a method for removal.   Our suggestion would be to paint the figures white and then paint as you desire.
. Yeah, again the results are passable but not impressive (Read: resultant paint a bit too thick).

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Posted by gmpullman on Monday, July 18, 2022 4:22 PM

chutton01
As for Woodland Scenics figures, while IMO they seem to be molded a little  'cartoony',

Yep!

 WS_figure by Edmund, on Flickr

Did these ladies forget to remove their oven mitts? Or are those white baseball gloves? 

Just sayin'

Regards, Ed

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Posted by richhotrain on Monday, July 18, 2022 4:39 PM

gmpullman

 WS_figure by Edmund, on Flickr

Did these ladies forget to remove their oven mitts? Or are those white baseball gloves?  

Ed, I believe that they are trying to protect their newly painted fingernails.

Whistling

Rich

Alton Junction

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Posted by chutton01 on Monday, July 18, 2022 4:54 PM

gmpullman
Did these ladies forget to remove their oven mitts? Or are those white baseball gloves? 


Those are thick white work gloves, the ladies are going to crank up the Fordson tractor and do some plowing of the back 40. They're wearing their dresses because they just read an article in National Geographic on SouthEast Asian farm women keeping cool during field work...

see, this is one of the problems I have with WS figures - their paint is somewhat thick and gloppily applied - and those black pin-point eyes - oy vey! Just use some shadowing to imply eyes and mouth in HO scale and smaller, save the detailed face painting for O gauge, Large Scale, and mil-scale (1/35) figures.

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Posted by Overmod on Monday, July 18, 2022 5:40 PM

gmpullman

 WS_figure by Edmund, on Flickr

Ed, you know they burned their hands and are doing their best to appear happy despite the heavy bandages and salve.

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Posted by gmpullman on Monday, July 18, 2022 5:55 PM

Overmod
Ed, you know they burned their hands—

Could be carpal tunnel? Or Moffat tunnel?

Cheers, Ed

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Posted by doctorwayne on Monday, July 18, 2022 6:27 PM

Naw, looks to me like a fist-fight about to happen...maybe a wandering hubby or maybe a stolen recipe.

Wayne

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Posted by wrench567 on Monday, July 18, 2022 8:19 PM

  Maybe in the kitchen with a pan of muffins.

 

  To the OP. Check out train shows. About twenty years ago, I bought a bag of unpainted figures of different makes for a couple bucks. Had to be about 200 figures. I've painted a couple dozen and the rest are still in storage.

     Pete

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Posted by trainnut1250 on Monday, July 18, 2022 11:20 PM

gmpullman

 

 
chutton01
As for Woodland Scenics figures, while IMO they seem to be molded a little  'cartoony',

 

Yep!

 WS_figure by Edmund, on Flickr

Did these ladies forget to remove their oven mitts? Or are those white baseball gloves? 

Just sayin'

Regards, Ed

 

Yeah I feel the same way about the WS figures.

There are lots of unpainted sets. In addition to preiser, there are Lytler and Lytler metal figures, Musket miniatures (crude but they do clean up well), SS Limited, shape ways and others. If you can be OK with commonly seen figures, the Campbells Weston figures are very nice along with the hundreds of painted Prieser sets that have come out over the years.

One of the issues that some modelers have with figures in motion is that they can look " frozen in mid stride"- the person swinging the axe is forever in mid chop etc. To avoid this, these modelers choose to have stationary figures that could plausibly be motionless for a period of time. People standing or seated etc....

Guy

see stuff at: the Willoughby Line Site

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Posted by MisterBeasley on Tuesday, July 19, 2022 1:20 PM

I picked a few figures out of one of those bags of little people.

With a bit of plastic putty, some limb rerrangement and craft paint, they ended up on the Yellow Brick Road.

Also, I model the Transition Era so women and girls in dresses don't bother me.  They fit right in.

Well, my model lady didn't get beady little eyes.

 

 

It takes an iron man to play with a toy iron horse. 

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Posted by rrebell on Saturday, July 23, 2022 9:20 AM

Preiser are the most relistic, espesialy if you give them a shade treatment. Weston are a bit of a caricture type and a bit out of scale but I use a couple because of the type and pose. You can buy Preiser unpainted also which I have used on some modifyed poses, you can pick up sets for cheap sometimes on e-bay, especialy sets that are partialy used.

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