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Minimum distance to side loading dock

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  • Member since
    May 2017
  • 120 posts
Minimum distance to side loading dock
Posted by restorator on Wednesday, August 3, 2022 4:01 PM

What is the minimum distance between a car and a side loading dock? And about  how much would be the max? 

  • Member since
    September 2002
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Posted by ndbprr on Wednesday, August 3, 2022 4:47 PM

i am sure there is a standard but it is also a function of the type of car being loaded. my dad worked for ITE Circuit Breaker company and they loaded flat cars with industrial switchgear.  the track was about two feet from the building and had an overhead crane in order to turn the switchgear 90 degrees.  the steel mill I worked at loaded mill scale into gons and you could walk down either side of the cars.  Box car distance may be a function of a forklift wheel size. It isn't hard to lay down a plate to cover the gap.  there are some instances of loading cars two tracks over b y using a car on the first track as a bridge.  so my answer is as close as possible or practical. If somebody questioned the distance on my model railroad i would tell them to get a life.

  • Member since
    September 2003
  • From: Omaha, NE
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Posted by dehusman on Wednesday, August 3, 2022 5:30 PM

There are standards for close, don't know of a standard for maximum distance.

Whatever the longest bridge plate you could get, 4-6 ft from dock to car?

Guardian Aluminum Dock Plate | Discount Ramps

Dave H. Painted side goes up. My website : wnbranch.com

  • Member since
    May 2020
  • 611 posts
Posted by wrench567 on Thursday, August 4, 2022 8:39 PM

  I've been in plants where the opening was inches. And others where the gap would be a foot or more. The Twinsburg stamping plant for Chrysler loaded racks of parts directly into the car without a dock plate. Then there were places that had hydraulic dock plates because the car floor was too high or too low.

    Pete.

  • Member since
    September 2003
  • From: Omaha, NE
  • 10,320 posts
Posted by dehusman on Thursday, August 4, 2022 10:00 PM

If you look at the industtrial development of modern railroad websites they have clearance diagrams for that type of stuff.  It is not measured for the car to teh dock, its measured from the center of track to the dock.

For example here is the UP's clearances:

0038.dgn (up.com)

For example on Spur tracks, UP standard is 9 ft from the center of track on platforms on spur tracks.

 

Dave H. Painted side goes up. My website : wnbranch.com

  • Member since
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  • From: Northfield Center TWP, OH
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Posted by dti406 on Friday, August 5, 2022 10:12 AM

dehusman

There are standards for close, don't know of a standard for maximum distance.

Whatever the longest bridge plate you could get, 4-6 ft from dock to car?

Guardian Aluminum Dock Plate | Discount Ramps

 

 

That is a truck dock plate, they make what is called a "railboard" for building to railcar.

I have enclosed the survey sheet website on what is needed to build a railboard, my wife used to work for this company and purchased the steel or aluminum for these railboards.

https://copperloy.com/wp-content/uploads/RAILBOARDDOCKBAORDSURVEYSHEET_REV_C.pdf

Rick Jesionowski

Rule 1: This is my railroad.

Rule 2: I make the rules.

Rule 3: Illuminating discussion of prototype history, equipment and operating practices is always welcome, but in the event of visitor-perceived anacronisms, detail descrepancies or operating errors, consult RULE 1!

  • Member since
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Posted by chutton01 on Friday, August 5, 2022 11:14 AM

dti406

...they make what is called a "railboard" for building to railcar.

I have enclosed the survey sheet website on what is needed to build a railboard, my wife used to work for this company and purchased the steel or aluminum for these railboards.

Interesting.
I see under "car types serviced" they list "Old Type Reefers", which is a bit amusing to me. I am going to go out on (not really much) of a limb and presume that since the survey revision is from March 2017 this means the 1960s/1970s era builds like PFE R-70-20 reefers (as opposed to the Trinity TrinCools being manufacturered today) and not some 1934 wood-sided RS ice-bunker reefer, which would have been considered the 'Old Type' when I was growing up.

  • Member since
    February 2008
  • From: Potomac Yard
  • 2,549 posts
Posted by NittanyLion on Friday, August 5, 2022 8:46 PM

You never know. My brother used to work for someone that made brake components for railroads. Around 2012 or so, they had a really specific order come in and he had to update some drawings that had a "last revision" date of 1947.

  • Member since
    May 2017
  • 120 posts
Posted by restorator on Saturday, August 6, 2022 2:59 PM

So I can make the dock pretty tight to the cars. Perfect for what I want to do in the space available. Thanks for the help.

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