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Turntables

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Turntables
Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, December 11, 2003 9:32 PM
I model USMRR in 1865. For the section I am modeling, the USMRR was using only 4-4-0 engines; therefore, only needed a 60' turntable. I have not found a supplier that offers a 60' HO turntable. CMR offers an N scale turntable that is approximately 60 scale feet in HO. Can this turntable be easily converted from N to HO? The photo in the ad also shows it with some sort of tubing that crosses over the platform (if that's the correct nominclature) at the mid-point. Is this purely decorative or does it have something to do with the wiring?

Thanks for your input.

RoN
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Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, December 11, 2003 11:06 PM
the turntable by Atlas scales out to around 65', try that.

http://www.walthers.com/exec/productinfo/150-305

Jay
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Posted by jrbarney on Friday, December 12, 2003 8:15 AM
Ron,
Years ago, Cliff Line/Robico sold a 57' (nominal) old time 'Gallows' turntable, their item TA-11. You might be able to find one at a "swap meet" or estate sale, possibly built up. I don't know if anyone took over the Cliff Line/Robico assets. I don't recall if Jay Cohen or other "fallen manufacturers" outlets have offered any of these kits. Good luck, but you may be in for some scratch building. It would be nice if some vendor offered a suitable center pivot for scratch builders already prewired.
Bob
"Time flies like an arrow - fruit flies like a banana." "In wine there is wisdom. In beer there is strength. In water there is bacteria." --German proverb
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Posted by Anonymous on Friday, December 12, 2003 8:48 AM
I scratch built my turntable, it wasn't hard. It was great fun really. Haven't had any problems with it in the three or so months since i finished it.

the bridge was made of styrene sheet, angle, square stock and I beam.
the pit was plywood and plaster and the pivot was telescoping brass tube and styrene as the insulator.

great fun and in my opinion better looking than the kits that were on the market for that size (75ft). Total cost, about £10 if that ($15).

back of the net!

neil
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Posted by Anonymous on Friday, December 12, 2003 2:31 PM
What is USMRR?

The structure on the middle of the turntable is used for turntables equiped for electical motors. This would certainly be not the case in 1865, no electricity then! The name evades me at this moment, but cantinary comes to mind...?

Colin
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  • From: WV
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Posted by coalminer3 on Friday, December 12, 2003 3:45 PM
USMRR = United States Military Railroad

work safe
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Posted by Anonymous on Friday, December 12, 2003 7:50 PM
Thanks, all!

I've got a great photo of the turntable I will model and may try a scratch build. My biggest concern (mainly because I haven't tried to scratch build anything, yet--but I know that I'd better get that in my modeling toolbox if I am going to stay in this time period) is wiring for correct polarity of the rails.

Bob wrote, "I don't recall if Jay Cohen or other "fallen manufacturers" outlets have offered any of these kits." Is there some sort of directory of "fallen manufacturers" outlets? Does Jay Cohen advertise in any of the magazines or have a website?

RoN
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Posted by Anonymous on Friday, December 12, 2003 9:16 PM
Ron where in Illinois are you? I'm going to start modeling 1870-1890 myself, so if your close we could bash ideas together and maybe even learn a few things about scratchbuiling old buildings.

Jay
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Posted by jrbarney on Saturday, December 13, 2003 8:40 AM
Ron,
Sorry about the incomplete staff work. Cohen's URL is:
<http://www.jaystrains.com>
As I recall, he does advertise in MR, and does send catalog pages quarterly if you become a purchaser. Guess I didn't include his URL the first time because I didn't want to favor him over possible other "fallen manufacturer" vendors.
Bob
"Time flies like an arrow - fruit flies like a banana." "In wine there is wisdom. In beer there is strength. In water there is bacteria." --German proverb
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Posted by jrbarney on Saturday, December 13, 2003 9:33 AM
Ron,
As an afterthought, there are two books you may want to read if you are not already aware of them. One is "Civil War Railroads & Models," Edwin P. Alexander, 1977, Crown Publishers. On page 56 there is a photo, and on page 57, a partial plan, of the turntable at Manassas Junction, VA. The other book, primarily text, is "Victory Rode the Rails, The Strategic Place of Railroads in the Civil War," George Edgar Turner, 1953/1981/1992, University of Nebraska Press. Also, you might want to get a copy of Buster Keaton's 1927 silent epic, "The General." My copy is a tape, VHS No 4042 from Critics' Choice Video, but it may be available on DVD by now.
Bob
"Time flies like an arrow - fruit flies like a banana." "In wine there is wisdom. In beer there is strength. In water there is bacteria." --German proverb
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Posted by jrbarney on Monday, December 15, 2003 8:53 AM
Ron,
I forgot to include "Civil War Railroads," by George B. Abdill, 1961, Superior Publishing Company. There is a later edition, but the gamma of the photos isn't as good as in the first edition, in my opinion, and there appears to be some minor cropping of some photos. There are various turntable scenes that should help you with details of the pit, etc.
Bob
"Time flies like an arrow - fruit flies like a banana." "In wine there is wisdom. In beer there is strength. In water there is bacteria." --German proverb
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Posted by jrbarney on Tuesday, December 23, 2003 12:56 PM
Ron,
Yet another book useful for modeling the USMRR era is "A Picture History of U. S. Transportation, On Rails, Roads and Rivers," Roderick Craib, 1958, Simmons-Boardman Publishing Corporation. Chapter 4, Transport and the war, is especially pertinent. However, there are photos in other chapters whose caption dates place them in the same era. Given the copyright date, you'll either have to borrow this via Inter Library Loan or look for a copy at the various used book sources, online and off. Hope this helps.
Bob
"Time flies like an arrow - fruit flies like a banana." "In wine there is wisdom. In beer there is strength. In water there is bacteria." --German proverb
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  • From: San Jose, California
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Posted by nfmisso on Tuesday, December 23, 2003 4:28 PM
In MR, during the past couple of years, there was an article on building a turntable on top of the Atlas TT. Basically, just mount a shaft to the Atlas that comes up to the center of your pit. Then build whatever on top.
Nigel N&W in HO scale, 1950 - 1955 (..and some a bit newer too) Now in San Jose, California

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