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alternative uses for walthers' pier terminal

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alternative uses for walthers' pier terminal
Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, September 11, 2003 8:02 PM
has anyone see any prototype buildings in real life that walthers' pier terminal building, midstate marble and red wing milling are model after? if so what would be good business alternatives for walthers' 3 kits i mentioned?
  • Member since
    April 2003
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alternative uses for walthers' pier terminal
Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, September 11, 2003 8:02 PM
has anyone see any prototype buildings in real life that walthers' pier terminal building, midstate marble and red wing milling are model after? if so what would be good business alternatives for walthers' 3 kits i mentioned?
  • Member since
    April 2003
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Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, September 18, 2003 4:50 PM
lou,

I think there is "Modeler's License" used by Walthers to create pike sized industries that will not dominate the layout. (Mr. Andy can you help?)

To offer a answer to your query about "Prototype" I will say that there are buildings in real life which must have inspired these Walther's structures. (And perhaps all model structures as well)

I have a port facility that is under construction using IHC's peir set and cranes. I do not have room for a ship, but I can try to model anything from a load of fresh fi***o steel and carbon from the nearby steel mill. There will be a Walther's Barge that will transfer cars to other loading points. (Any one know of a good 1/87 tugboat?)

Good Luck with your buildings lou.
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,206 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, September 18, 2003 4:50 PM
lou,

I think there is "Modeler's License" used by Walthers to create pike sized industries that will not dominate the layout. (Mr. Andy can you help?)

To offer a answer to your query about "Prototype" I will say that there are buildings in real life which must have inspired these Walther's structures. (And perhaps all model structures as well)

I have a port facility that is under construction using IHC's peir set and cranes. I do not have room for a ship, but I can try to model anything from a load of fresh fi***o steel and carbon from the nearby steel mill. There will be a Walther's Barge that will transfer cars to other loading points. (Any one know of a good 1/87 tugboat?)

Good Luck with your buildings lou.
  • Member since
    August 2002
  • From: Corpus Christi, Texas
  • 2,377 posts
Posted by leighant on Sunday, October 5, 2003 3:41 PM
I don't know the specific prototype for Walters pier terminal building. The elaborate front is appropriate for a port terminal because that is in some sense, the monumental entry to a city or nation, just as a major railroad passenger terminal can be in effect a "city gate". The fancy front, to my way of thinking, makes it unlikely as an "ordinary" warehouse or shipping building. It looks as if it is designed to sit at a perpendicular to a shoreline, sticking out into the water with a place for a ship on each side. I thought there was an article the past year or so about a layout representing a pier terminal on the east coast, Baltimore or New Jersey, but I haven't been able to find the article. The front reminds me of the fanciness though not the specific design of the Embarcadero in San Francisco. See sfmuseum.net/1906.2/tower.html or sfphototour.tripod.com/hyatt_regency.html.

I can imagine the Walthers kit being used to make an approximation of the waterfront in Galveston. The port sheds there run parallel to the shoreline, and parallel to most of the railyards and the former passenger station tracks (now a rail museum). There is a fancy entrance to what is now a Cruise Ship Terminal visible front the front of the rail passenger station. (In recent years, a passenger overhead walkway to cross a heavy street traffic has been added which wouldn't match the Walther's building.) It would neat to "open out" the Walthers building and use it to make a "flat", with the fancy front in the center and plain wings with cargo doors on each side, making a "flat" a scale 270 feet long. The ships were on the other side from the railroad so they could be represented on a layout by pictures on the background.

Walthers Midstate Marble includes a building which could have a number of uses, an overhead traveling craneway (which is similar to one they sell separately) and a stiff leg derrick with a hoist house. I have seen photos of a similar craneway used in a Vermont stone FINISHING plant and in a similar Texas operation. And in Indiana, and upstate New York, if I remember correctly. The craneway is also used in industries handling pipe, structural steel, steel fabrication yards, etc. Widely used in a variety of industries. But available separately, in at least a couple of versions.
I have seen the stiff leg derrick used in a QUARRY outside Marble Falls, Texas, and in quarries elsewhere. Similar stiff leg derricks were used in logging. I have not seen that type of crane used much in dockside ship loading or in construction.

Red Wing Milling is a flour mill that could be found in a wide part of the country. There are some photos of large flour mills of similar construction in the 1999 Model Railroad Planning. Red Wing Milling could also be a rice mill or possible a feed mill for producing animal feed.

Kenneth L. Anthony, Imaginary Traffic Consultant, Santa Vaca & Santa Fe Model Rwy.
  • Member since
    August 2002
  • From: Corpus Christi, Texas
  • 2,377 posts
Posted by leighant on Sunday, October 5, 2003 3:41 PM
I don't know the specific prototype for Walters pier terminal building. The elaborate front is appropriate for a port terminal because that is in some sense, the monumental entry to a city or nation, just as a major railroad passenger terminal can be in effect a "city gate". The fancy front, to my way of thinking, makes it unlikely as an "ordinary" warehouse or shipping building. It looks as if it is designed to sit at a perpendicular to a shoreline, sticking out into the water with a place for a ship on each side. I thought there was an article the past year or so about a layout representing a pier terminal on the east coast, Baltimore or New Jersey, but I haven't been able to find the article. The front reminds me of the fanciness though not the specific design of the Embarcadero in San Francisco. See sfmuseum.net/1906.2/tower.html or sfphototour.tripod.com/hyatt_regency.html.

I can imagine the Walthers kit being used to make an approximation of the waterfront in Galveston. The port sheds there run parallel to the shoreline, and parallel to most of the railyards and the former passenger station tracks (now a rail museum). There is a fancy entrance to what is now a Cruise Ship Terminal visible front the front of the rail passenger station. (In recent years, a passenger overhead walkway to cross a heavy street traffic has been added which wouldn't match the Walther's building.) It would neat to "open out" the Walthers building and use it to make a "flat", with the fancy front in the center and plain wings with cargo doors on each side, making a "flat" a scale 270 feet long. The ships were on the other side from the railroad so they could be represented on a layout by pictures on the background.

Walthers Midstate Marble includes a building which could have a number of uses, an overhead traveling craneway (which is similar to one they sell separately) and a stiff leg derrick with a hoist house. I have seen photos of a similar craneway used in a Vermont stone FINISHING plant and in a similar Texas operation. And in Indiana, and upstate New York, if I remember correctly. The craneway is also used in industries handling pipe, structural steel, steel fabrication yards, etc. Widely used in a variety of industries. But available separately, in at least a couple of versions.
I have seen the stiff leg derrick used in a QUARRY outside Marble Falls, Texas, and in quarries elsewhere. Similar stiff leg derricks were used in logging. I have not seen that type of crane used much in dockside ship loading or in construction.

Red Wing Milling is a flour mill that could be found in a wide part of the country. There are some photos of large flour mills of similar construction in the 1999 Model Railroad Planning. Red Wing Milling could also be a rice mill or possible a feed mill for producing animal feed.

Kenneth L. Anthony, Imaginary Traffic Consultant, Santa Vaca & Santa Fe Model Rwy.
  • Member since
    August 2002
  • From: Corpus Christi, Texas
  • 2,377 posts
Posted by leighant on Sunday, October 5, 2003 3:46 PM
One other note. According to Model Railroaders magazine index, there was an article on using Walthers waterfront structures in Model RailroadING Feb.1999 Don't confuse Model RailroadING with Model RailroadER. Model RailroadER is my all-time favorite but its worthwhile looking in other mags once in a while. Personal opinion.
  • Member since
    August 2002
  • From: Corpus Christi, Texas
  • 2,377 posts
Posted by leighant on Sunday, October 5, 2003 3:46 PM
One other note. According to Model Railroaders magazine index, there was an article on using Walthers waterfront structures in Model RailroadING Feb.1999 Don't confuse Model RailroadING with Model RailroadER. Model RailroadER is my all-time favorite but its worthwhile looking in other mags once in a while. Personal opinion.
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,206 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, October 5, 2003 6:14 PM
ive turned my mid state marble co into a scrap yard. i saw a building simular to this used for recyle an salvage the interior was a sorting an bailing set up for brass copper an aluminum stainless etc any high end scrap was kept under lock an key untill shipped out buy truck the cast an sheet tin was loaded to railcar when amounts reached yard capacity for a load.
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,206 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, October 5, 2003 6:14 PM
ive turned my mid state marble co into a scrap yard. i saw a building simular to this used for recyle an salvage the interior was a sorting an bailing set up for brass copper an aluminum stainless etc any high end scrap was kept under lock an key untill shipped out buy truck the cast an sheet tin was loaded to railcar when amounts reached yard capacity for a load.
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,206 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, October 5, 2003 8:50 PM
I had a memory flaw and now I remember where a similar building may be found. It is close to a City Dock in Philadelphia. There ships came in one side and docked and unloaded Grapes, Banannas, apples and plums etc etc.. That was transloaded into 18 wheelers and sent throughout the area usually to food stores and markets. Some of it is sent inland to kennet's square PA and sold from there.

Hope this helps.
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,206 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, October 5, 2003 8:50 PM
I had a memory flaw and now I remember where a similar building may be found. It is close to a City Dock in Philadelphia. There ships came in one side and docked and unloaded Grapes, Banannas, apples and plums etc etc.. That was transloaded into 18 wheelers and sent throughout the area usually to food stores and markets. Some of it is sent inland to kennet's square PA and sold from there.

Hope this helps.

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