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starter layout?

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  • Member since
    February 2001
  • From: US
  • 10 posts
Posted by dwaneet on Tuesday, September 16, 2003 10:21 PM
I solved the problem with the wife a divorce! ( there were other reasons for it) However I'm working on turning my former bedroom into my layout room. I took a smaller room for my self.
  • Member since
    February 2001
  • From: US
  • 10 posts
Posted by dwaneet on Tuesday, September 16, 2003 10:21 PM
I solved the problem with the wife a divorce! ( there were other reasons for it) However I'm working on turning my former bedroom into my layout room. I took a smaller room for my self.
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,205 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, September 16, 2003 9:58 PM
Thanks for all your input and suggestions!! I've really been enjoying my new hobby!
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,205 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, September 16, 2003 9:58 PM
Thanks for all your input and suggestions!! I've really been enjoying my new hobby!
  • Member since
    April 2002
  • From: Nashville TN
  • 1,306 posts
Posted by Wdlgln005 on Tuesday, September 16, 2003 9:54 PM
Welcome to model railroading, and enjoy building your first layout.

The answer to your questions depends on what kind of space you have to devote to a layout. A good answer may be to find an Ntrak club and build a module or two. Go to the Atlas website and download their RTS software. I like getting free software that can give you a plan or two for the space you have.

Come back here as you start on your layout We love to help other Ntrakers!
Glenn Woodle
  • Member since
    April 2002
  • From: Nashville TN
  • 1,306 posts
Posted by Wdlgln005 on Tuesday, September 16, 2003 9:54 PM
Welcome to model railroading, and enjoy building your first layout.

The answer to your questions depends on what kind of space you have to devote to a layout. A good answer may be to find an Ntrak club and build a module or two. Go to the Atlas website and download their RTS software. I like getting free software that can give you a plan or two for the space you have.

Come back here as you start on your layout We love to help other Ntrakers!
Glenn Woodle
  • Member since
    March 2002
  • 8 posts
Posted by rigolo on Tuesday, September 16, 2003 3:41 PM
if you find a copy of Model Railroader December 1996,the project name "Carolina Central" is a good starting project. And for you're wife well...good luck body!
  • Member since
    March 2002
  • 8 posts
Posted by rigolo on Tuesday, September 16, 2003 3:41 PM
if you find a copy of Model Railroader December 1996,the project name "Carolina Central" is a good starting project. And for you're wife well...good luck body!
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,205 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, September 15, 2003 4:04 PM
You can tell your spouse that model railroading is a wonderful hobby because you'll learn carpentry, electical, and detailing skills which could be useful in fixing things around the house. She'll also know where to find you whenever she wants and you'll not be following her all over the house when you retire. My wife jokes about putting a lock on the outside of my railroad room so she can control how much time I can be out of it bothering her.
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,205 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, September 15, 2003 4:04 PM
You can tell your spouse that model railroading is a wonderful hobby because you'll learn carpentry, electical, and detailing skills which could be useful in fixing things around the house. She'll also know where to find you whenever she wants and you'll not be following her all over the house when you retire. My wife jokes about putting a lock on the outside of my railroad room so she can control how much time I can be out of it bothering her.
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,205 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, September 14, 2003 10:27 PM
In converting a spouse, the slow and gradual approach works best. Remember in your mind you have this grand great looking layout that is going to happen; in her mind, you want to play with trains.

I would start with a module whether you join an Ntrack club or not. Work and it and take it to a fair level of being finished (looking good). This will take you anywhere from 3 months to a year. After that just simply start on the next module. By then, your wife has gotten used to the ideas of trains in the house, has an idea of what you are about, and has become used to the whole thing. Just keep adding modules until you hear the word "no."
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,205 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, September 14, 2003 10:27 PM
In converting a spouse, the slow and gradual approach works best. Remember in your mind you have this grand great looking layout that is going to happen; in her mind, you want to play with trains.

I would start with a module whether you join an Ntrack club or not. Work and it and take it to a fair level of being finished (looking good). This will take you anywhere from 3 months to a year. After that just simply start on the next module. By then, your wife has gotten used to the ideas of trains in the house, has an idea of what you are about, and has become used to the whole thing. Just keep adding modules until you hear the word "no."
  • Member since
    September 2003
  • From: California - moved to North Carolina 2018
  • 4,422 posts
Posted by DSchmitt on Sunday, September 14, 2003 9:39 PM
For N scale taking an HO 4 x 8 plan and bodifing it to fit 3 x 6 is a good way to start.
Most people start with a layout where the train chases its own tail. Theres nothing wrong with this, but be sure to build in some switching too. A friend fit a John Alen Timesaver into the twice around oval heand his grandson are building. There are a lot of good track plan and planning books in the hobby shop. 101 Track Plans is a classic and is still in print. John Armstrong has some books on how the real railroads work and adapting rhe prototype to modeling. More recently Ian Rice has done some nice plans.

Maybe you can get her involved. My friend likes to build snall structures and make trees from Woodland Scenics tree kits.

Jim Fitzgeralds's (NTRAK editor) wife was already a model railroader when he met her. She is promotong TTRAK which is a modular standard smaller than NTRAK.

I know a lady who makes trees from sctatch trees to sell. Her trees are accurate models of the different species. She got involved because of her son.

Don

I tried to sell my two cents worth, but no one would give me a plug nickel for it.

I don't have a leg to stand on.

  • Member since
    September 2003
  • From: California - moved to North Carolina 2018
  • 4,422 posts
Posted by DSchmitt on Sunday, September 14, 2003 9:39 PM
For N scale taking an HO 4 x 8 plan and bodifing it to fit 3 x 6 is a good way to start.
Most people start with a layout where the train chases its own tail. Theres nothing wrong with this, but be sure to build in some switching too. A friend fit a John Alen Timesaver into the twice around oval heand his grandson are building. There are a lot of good track plan and planning books in the hobby shop. 101 Track Plans is a classic and is still in print. John Armstrong has some books on how the real railroads work and adapting rhe prototype to modeling. More recently Ian Rice has done some nice plans.

Maybe you can get her involved. My friend likes to build snall structures and make trees from Woodland Scenics tree kits.

Jim Fitzgeralds's (NTRAK editor) wife was already a model railroader when he met her. She is promotong TTRAK which is a modular standard smaller than NTRAK.

I know a lady who makes trees from sctatch trees to sell. Her trees are accurate models of the different species. She got involved because of her son.

Don

I tried to sell my two cents worth, but no one would give me a plug nickel for it.

I don't have a leg to stand on.

  • Member since
    June 2003
  • From: Culpeper, Va
  • 8,204 posts
Posted by IRONROOSTER on Sunday, September 14, 2003 8:12 PM
How big you need depends on what you want to do. While a small size is a good idea, watch out for too much complexity in the early going. A single track oval with a couple of switches on a 4x8 foot table will be easier than a double track oval with crossovers, a yard and a bunch of spurs in 2x4 foot. One possibility would be to join a local NTRK group (if there is one near you) and build a 2x4 foot NTRK module. This would give you some experience and help from the members. The module could be later incorporated into a home layout.
Enjoy
Paul
If you're having fun, you're doing it the right way.
  • Member since
    June 2003
  • From: Culpeper, Va
  • 8,204 posts
Posted by IRONROOSTER on Sunday, September 14, 2003 8:12 PM
How big you need depends on what you want to do. While a small size is a good idea, watch out for too much complexity in the early going. A single track oval with a couple of switches on a 4x8 foot table will be easier than a double track oval with crossovers, a yard and a bunch of spurs in 2x4 foot. One possibility would be to join a local NTRK group (if there is one near you) and build a 2x4 foot NTRK module. This would give you some experience and help from the members. The module could be later incorporated into a home layout.
Enjoy
Paul
If you're having fun, you're doing it the right way.
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,205 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, September 13, 2003 8:49 PM
QUOTE: Originally posted by EJEman

I got interested in model railroading about a year ago, and I think I'm ready to try my first layout. Any suggestions for a good size for my first layout (N scale)? Also, any tips on negotiating with spouses for room in the house for a layout?


Your success in negotiating with your spouse for room may depend on how much space you require. If you are wanting to put this layout someplace where her family and friends will be able to see, then I would suggest doing your best to make the woodworking for the frame that the layout is to set on to be quality work. Not just plywood on ugly 2 x 4's. As much as I love this hobby and hope to have a layout in the family room, I would want the framework that it sat on to look nice. Just my dollar's worth on that. I'm telling you this from a female perspective. Wish you luck on finding a space in your home. Your biggest success might be to find a way to get her interested in what you are doing.

As far as a good size, many people in n scale find alot of success with starting on a 2' x 4' layout or a little larger. But if this is your first layout, don't make it so big that you get overwhelmed by it. Start small with plans to add on at a later date.
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,205 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, September 13, 2003 8:49 PM
QUOTE: Originally posted by EJEman

I got interested in model railroading about a year ago, and I think I'm ready to try my first layout. Any suggestions for a good size for my first layout (N scale)? Also, any tips on negotiating with spouses for room in the house for a layout?


Your success in negotiating with your spouse for room may depend on how much space you require. If you are wanting to put this layout someplace where her family and friends will be able to see, then I would suggest doing your best to make the woodworking for the frame that the layout is to set on to be quality work. Not just plywood on ugly 2 x 4's. As much as I love this hobby and hope to have a layout in the family room, I would want the framework that it sat on to look nice. Just my dollar's worth on that. I'm telling you this from a female perspective. Wish you luck on finding a space in your home. Your biggest success might be to find a way to get her interested in what you are doing.

As far as a good size, many people in n scale find alot of success with starting on a 2' x 4' layout or a little larger. But if this is your first layout, don't make it so big that you get overwhelmed by it. Start small with plans to add on at a later date.
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,205 posts
starter layout?
Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, September 13, 2003 8:22 PM
I got interested in model railroading about a year ago, and I think I'm ready to try my first layout. Any suggestions for a good size for my first layout (N scale)? Also, any tips on negotiating with spouses for room in the house for a layout?
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,205 posts
starter layout?
Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, September 13, 2003 8:22 PM
I got interested in model railroading about a year ago, and I think I'm ready to try my first layout. Any suggestions for a good size for my first layout (N scale)? Also, any tips on negotiating with spouses for room in the house for a layout?

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