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Some 4x8 Questions

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18 replies
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  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,205 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, September 21, 2003 8:43 AM
Chris,

Randy made some good points I cannot find much to add to it. You mentioned a time frame of 15-20 hours. I would not worry about that too much.. you see, it can easily take a hour to carefully assemble a Accurail Frieght car kit, check the coupler heights, ensure that the wheels track true to gauge, that the car has all the parts properly installed and that it fits your overall "Theme" Researching a locomotive, and track etc is very good too.

Try to use "code" 83 track. Atlas makes a durable line that is not too expensive. Remember to use 22 inch radius if you can, many of today's locomotives will not accept shorter radii very well.

Ignore the rivalry between the DCC Knights and the Throttle Barons. Technology changes as we age and some of us find it "IF it aint broke dont fix it" I will admit that it is very exciting and wonderful new things that we can do with DCC. but bottom dollar is what I can spend a month in the store.

One more item, go slowly and test fit the track and test each switch and connection as you go. It is much easier to fix a problem BEFORE you pernamently fasten the rail to the table. Do not be frusterated by minor setbacks and kinks. It is all part of the fun to find and isolate and finally fix problems.

Have Fun, and let us know what grade you earned.

Lee
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,205 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Sunday, September 21, 2003 8:43 AM
Chris,

Randy made some good points I cannot find much to add to it. You mentioned a time frame of 15-20 hours. I would not worry about that too much.. you see, it can easily take a hour to carefully assemble a Accurail Frieght car kit, check the coupler heights, ensure that the wheels track true to gauge, that the car has all the parts properly installed and that it fits your overall "Theme" Researching a locomotive, and track etc is very good too.

Try to use "code" 83 track. Atlas makes a durable line that is not too expensive. Remember to use 22 inch radius if you can, many of today's locomotives will not accept shorter radii very well.

Ignore the rivalry between the DCC Knights and the Throttle Barons. Technology changes as we age and some of us find it "IF it aint broke dont fix it" I will admit that it is very exciting and wonderful new things that we can do with DCC. but bottom dollar is what I can spend a month in the store.

One more item, go slowly and test fit the track and test each switch and connection as you go. It is much easier to fix a problem BEFORE you pernamently fasten the rail to the table. Do not be frusterated by minor setbacks and kinks. It is all part of the fun to find and isolate and finally fix problems.

Have Fun, and let us know what grade you earned.

Lee
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,205 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, September 22, 2003 8:51 AM
For Chris:

If you are looking for something that takes 15-20 hours, I might suggest a diarama, rather than an entire layout. *** scene that takes up about 1 foot by 2-3 feet max, and work on that. You'll be surprised how quickly the time goes, especially on structures. I have been working on some "craftsman" type kits - very detailed, almost scratchbuilding, and they are taking 5-6 hours each.

Andrew
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,205 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, September 22, 2003 8:51 AM
For Chris:

If you are looking for something that takes 15-20 hours, I might suggest a diarama, rather than an entire layout. *** scene that takes up about 1 foot by 2-3 feet max, and work on that. You'll be surprised how quickly the time goes, especially on structures. I have been working on some "craftsman" type kits - very detailed, almost scratchbuilding, and they are taking 5-6 hours each.

Andrew
  • Member since
    January 2001
  • From: Guelph, Ont.
  • 1,476 posts
Posted by BR60103 on Monday, September 22, 2003 9:30 PM
Chris:
I did a 2 foot square piece of scenery for a non-rail show last year and I spent most of a month on it, without operating track and using buildings that I pinched from my main layout. You could probably do something faster, as a lot of time is waiting for glue to dry. If you were less fastidious with the scenery it would speed it up.

--David

  • Member since
    January 2001
  • From: Guelph, Ont.
  • 1,476 posts
Posted by BR60103 on Monday, September 22, 2003 9:30 PM
Chris:
I did a 2 foot square piece of scenery for a non-rail show last year and I spent most of a month on it, without operating track and using buildings that I pinched from my main layout. You could probably do something faster, as a lot of time is waiting for glue to dry. If you were less fastidious with the scenery it would speed it up.

--David

  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,205 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, September 23, 2003 12:50 PM
I LIVE IN WAYNE COUNTY OHIO AND IM LOOKING FOR SOMEONE TO HELP ME BUILD A 4X8 LAYOUT ANY HELPERS? EMAIL ME AT rpower@zoominternet.net
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,205 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Tuesday, September 23, 2003 12:50 PM
I LIVE IN WAYNE COUNTY OHIO AND IM LOOKING FOR SOMEONE TO HELP ME BUILD A 4X8 LAYOUT ANY HELPERS? EMAIL ME AT rpower@zoominternet.net

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