Trains.com

Subscriber & Member Login

Login, or register today to interact in our online community, comment on articles, receive our newsletter, manage your account online and more!

Realistic track work

7485 views
23 replies
1 rating 2 rating 3 rating 4 rating 5 rating
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,205 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, August 30, 2003 4:24 PM
I will modify what I said as I forgot the code:

Shinohara is the preferred brand here in Vancouver BC - Code 70.
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,205 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Saturday, August 30, 2003 4:24 PM
I will modify what I said as I forgot the code:

Shinohara is the preferred brand here in Vancouver BC - Code 70.
  • Member since
    September 2002
  • From: Nova Scotia, Northumberland Shore
  • 2,479 posts
Posted by der5997 on Sunday, August 31, 2003 5:59 PM
Richard: How about a comprimise? (Like rsn48, I'm Canadain, and comprimise seems to be a national passtime [:)] Code 70 for your regular track, code 83 for the #10 turnouts. By the time it's all painted and ballasted, (quick pause to admire a truly awesome sunset) you will be well pleased, I think.

"There are always alternatives, Captain" - Spock.

  • Member since
    September 2002
  • From: Nova Scotia, Northumberland Shore
  • 2,479 posts
Posted by der5997 on Sunday, August 31, 2003 5:59 PM
Richard: How about a comprimise? (Like rsn48, I'm Canadain, and comprimise seems to be a national passtime [:)] Code 70 for your regular track, code 83 for the #10 turnouts. By the time it's all painted and ballasted, (quick pause to admire a truly awesome sunset) you will be well pleased, I think.

"There are always alternatives, Captain" - Spock.

  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,205 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, September 17, 2003 8:23 PM
I have used both Shinohara and Atlas code 83 on the mainline and sidings. I find the Atlas is just as good as the other and after you ballast the track, you can't really tell the difference. I've used Shinohara turnouts but am slowly replacing them with hand-laid ones. It is not as difficult as it seems and you can make them whatever size you want. This is particularly helpful on curved turnouts. Also there is less problems with DCC.

I used Atlas code 100 in my hidden staging areas for three reasons; there are less derailments; it's cheaper and I can use Peco turnouts.
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,205 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Wednesday, September 17, 2003 8:23 PM
I have used both Shinohara and Atlas code 83 on the mainline and sidings. I find the Atlas is just as good as the other and after you ballast the track, you can't really tell the difference. I've used Shinohara turnouts but am slowly replacing them with hand-laid ones. It is not as difficult as it seems and you can make them whatever size you want. This is particularly helpful on curved turnouts. Also there is less problems with DCC.

I used Atlas code 100 in my hidden staging areas for three reasons; there are less derailments; it's cheaper and I can use Peco turnouts.
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,205 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, September 25, 2003 9:56 AM
The standard I use is code 83 on the mainlines, code 70 in the yards.
It really makes a difference.

I have no problems transitioning from Code 83 to code 70 as needed.

In fact, I even glue one metal fishplates every scale 39 feet on the foreground sidings on the code 70. Very subtle, adds more realism, and some "clickety clack" for some cars. :)

One problem: some Altas "Code 83" flex track is thicker and looks more like Code 100 when laid next to MicroEngineering Code 83 flex and/or Walthers/Shinohara Code 83 turnouts. Hmmm... makes me wonder if the local hobby shop is passing off Code 100 flex as code 83? :)

As for code 100 turnouts in staging areas, beware.
Atlas custom line #6 turnouts work fine, but I had a bad experience with a very old Mark III (?) turnout. The points are not rails, but actually bent sheet metal.
The rounded surface makes my low profile flanges wander and derailments can occur. This defeats the purpose of high-profile rail in hidden areas!
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,205 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, September 25, 2003 9:56 AM
The standard I use is code 83 on the mainlines, code 70 in the yards.
It really makes a difference.

I have no problems transitioning from Code 83 to code 70 as needed.

In fact, I even glue one metal fishplates every scale 39 feet on the foreground sidings on the code 70. Very subtle, adds more realism, and some "clickety clack" for some cars. :)

One problem: some Altas "Code 83" flex track is thicker and looks more like Code 100 when laid next to MicroEngineering Code 83 flex and/or Walthers/Shinohara Code 83 turnouts. Hmmm... makes me wonder if the local hobby shop is passing off Code 100 flex as code 83? :)

As for code 100 turnouts in staging areas, beware.
Atlas custom line #6 turnouts work fine, but I had a bad experience with a very old Mark III (?) turnout. The points are not rails, but actually bent sheet metal.
The rounded surface makes my low profile flanges wander and derailments can occur. This defeats the purpose of high-profile rail in hidden areas!
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,205 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, September 25, 2003 6:27 PM
I am not a expert at laying track. I use Atlas Code 83 and #6 for mains, #4 for yards etc. I also use flextrack to try and breakup long straight sections as well as cutting down on joints of sectional track.

However if done properly handlaid track can really bring joy to you. I think if I did it, I may end up in a sanitarum screaming "Ties!, Ties!, Ties!"

I recently watched the UP replace every tie on a 50 mile stretch of double track. Took them several weeks with every train crawling past blasting the wistle every 10 feet. But now they have fine track. None of that pumping with spurting mud and water splashing on the crossing.
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,205 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Thursday, September 25, 2003 6:27 PM
I am not a expert at laying track. I use Atlas Code 83 and #6 for mains, #4 for yards etc. I also use flextrack to try and breakup long straight sections as well as cutting down on joints of sectional track.

However if done properly handlaid track can really bring joy to you. I think if I did it, I may end up in a sanitarum screaming "Ties!, Ties!, Ties!"

I recently watched the UP replace every tie on a 50 mile stretch of double track. Took them several weeks with every train crawling past blasting the wistle every 10 feet. But now they have fine track. None of that pumping with spurting mud and water splashing on the crossing.
  • Member since
    January 2002
  • 1,132 posts
Posted by jrbarney on Sunday, September 28, 2003 10:44 AM
Richard,
Dave's post didn't mention a source for the fishplates. Just bought a copy of the 2004 Walthers catalogue yesterday, and while thumbing through it noted that, for one, Details West, sells them. They have both 2 bolt (Code 70) and 3 bolt (Code 83) fishplates/railbars and also offer two types of turnout rail braces. Add a razor saw slot every 39 feet and you could have some detailed foreground trackage. Their Web site for these and other trackside details is: <http://www.detailswest.com>
Bob
"Time flies like an arrow - fruit flies like a banana." "In wine there is wisdom. In beer there is strength. In water there is bacteria." --German proverb
  • Member since
    January 2002
  • 1,132 posts
Posted by jrbarney on Sunday, September 28, 2003 10:44 AM
Richard,
Dave's post didn't mention a source for the fishplates. Just bought a copy of the 2004 Walthers catalogue yesterday, and while thumbing through it noted that, for one, Details West, sells them. They have both 2 bolt (Code 70) and 3 bolt (Code 83) fishplates/railbars and also offer two types of turnout rail braces. Add a razor saw slot every 39 feet and you could have some detailed foreground trackage. Their Web site for these and other trackside details is: <http://www.detailswest.com>
Bob
"Time flies like an arrow - fruit flies like a banana." "In wine there is wisdom. In beer there is strength. In water there is bacteria." --German proverb
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,205 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, September 29, 2003 2:07 PM
My network is mainly 3 rail Microengineering and it works well. I have Shinohara points which are OK but I have some problems with the narrow guage engines and the larger standard guage engines. I ought not to have these problems with the HOn3 engines because they are all brass. The problem with the HO engines is that some have the deep flanges that came before the new finer tolerances and rail heights. Wiring 3 rail needs patience!

I model the Rio Grande Southern with its coaches all ones that served on the Rio Grande, Pagosa and Northern and I live near Brighton England. Why do I model that? I like the two quirky railroads and the decent sized narrow guaged engines, some of which are bigger than English standard guage!
  • Member since
    April 2003
  • 305,205 posts
Posted by Anonymous on Monday, September 29, 2003 2:07 PM
My network is mainly 3 rail Microengineering and it works well. I have Shinohara points which are OK but I have some problems with the narrow guage engines and the larger standard guage engines. I ought not to have these problems with the HOn3 engines because they are all brass. The problem with the HO engines is that some have the deep flanges that came before the new finer tolerances and rail heights. Wiring 3 rail needs patience!

I model the Rio Grande Southern with its coaches all ones that served on the Rio Grande, Pagosa and Northern and I live near Brighton England. Why do I model that? I like the two quirky railroads and the decent sized narrow guaged engines, some of which are bigger than English standard guage!
  • Member since
    February 2002
  • From: PtTownsendWA
  • 1,445 posts
Posted by johncolley on Tuesday, November 4, 2003 9:48 PM
I am using 83 for mainlines and 70 for yards, spurs and sidings. I am curious to see how many folks are using/planning to use large radii with easements and large no. turnouts? I am planning to use #10 for mainline crossings and #8 for sidings, #6 for most spurs with some forked branches #4 or #4 wye. I am using 24 to 36inch radius on hidden or obscured curves with 42, 48, or even 60 to 72 inch on visible arcs less than 90 degrees. John Colley Port Townsend, WA
jc5729
  • Member since
    February 2002
  • From: PtTownsendWA
  • 1,445 posts
Posted by johncolley on Tuesday, November 4, 2003 9:48 PM
I am using 83 for mainlines and 70 for yards, spurs and sidings. I am curious to see how many folks are using/planning to use large radii with easements and large no. turnouts? I am planning to use #10 for mainline crossings and #8 for sidings, #6 for most spurs with some forked branches #4 or #4 wye. I am using 24 to 36inch radius on hidden or obscured curves with 42, 48, or even 60 to 72 inch on visible arcs less than 90 degrees. John Colley Port Townsend, WA
jc5729
  • Member since
    September 2003
  • From: Omaha, NE
  • 10,613 posts
Posted by dehusman on Wednesday, November 5, 2003 9:35 PM
Track center spacing on US mainlines is about 13 ft. It varies from place to place and road to road. Very rarely less than 12 ft. recently reconstructed tracks may be 20-25 ft apart. Track centers may widen on curves, but not that much.

In HO the generally accepted track center spacing is about 2 inches on tangent and 2-2 1/4 in on curves.

Dave H.

Dave H. Painted side goes up. My website : wnbranch.com

  • Member since
    September 2003
  • From: Omaha, NE
  • 10,613 posts
Posted by dehusman on Wednesday, November 5, 2003 9:35 PM
Track center spacing on US mainlines is about 13 ft. It varies from place to place and road to road. Very rarely less than 12 ft. recently reconstructed tracks may be 20-25 ft apart. Track centers may widen on curves, but not that much.

In HO the generally accepted track center spacing is about 2 inches on tangent and 2-2 1/4 in on curves.

Dave H.

Dave H. Painted side goes up. My website : wnbranch.com

Subscriber & Member Login

Login, or register today to interact in our online community, comment on articles, receive our newsletter, manage your account online and more!

Users Online

Search the Community

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
Model Railroader Newsletter See all
Sign up for our FREE e-newsletter and get model railroad news in your inbox!