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Need Lacquer paint for glueshell scenery

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  • Member since
    May 2006
  • From: Espoo, Finland
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Posted by Agamemnon on Friday, May 12, 2006 5:15 AM
The technique sounds similar to a miniature gamers' trick of sealing cardboard scenery with watered-down PVA glue (often also used to safen up styrofoam for spraypainting). Once the glue is dry, the piece should endure small amounts of water or equivalent without undue warping.
Gott ist Tot. "Tell them that God bids us do good for evil: And thus clothe my naked villainy With odd old ends stol'n forth of holy writ; And seem a saint when most I play the devil."
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  • From: Weymouth, Ma.
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Posted by bogp40 on Thursday, May 11, 2006 9:04 PM
Just use Bullseye white shellac thinned w/ denatured alcohol. Why wouldn't an acrylic/latex paint do for sealing the glue? Less stink, cheaper and can even get the cheap gallons of the mistakes.
Bob K.

Modeling B&O- Chessie  Bob K.  www.ssmrc.org

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  • From: Clinton, MO, US
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Posted by Medina1128 on Thursday, May 11, 2006 7:24 PM
Why not use clear matte medium, ala Modpodge? It's available at Wal-Mart. I used the gloss to make the fishing hole for the lumberjacks at the lumber mill. It's water soluble until dry.
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  • From: California City
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Posted by spectratone on Thursday, May 11, 2006 6:59 AM
unless your going to hose off the layout once a week for dust regular flat house paint will work just fine. your glue/water mix will be more glue than water so it should dry fast and when you put on the grass that will sop up moisture too. open a window or use a fan to circulate air which will help in evaporation.
glenn
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  • From: Loudonville, NY
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Posted by Benjamin Maggi on Wednesday, May 10, 2006 3:54 PM
While I was on my way back from the hardware store with a can of green enamel, I remembered that a 18 months ago I had purchased a larger can of green enamel from the same hardware store and only used a little bit.

Doh! So, I will return the new one tomorrow. Meanwhile, I painted my hills.

Thus, at least for now, my hills are John Deere Green... hey, if the paint is good enough and strong enough for a tractor, it should be okay for my layout!

Modeling the D&H in 1984: http://dandhcoloniemain.blogspot.com/

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  • From: Loudonville, NY
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Posted by Benjamin Maggi on Wednesday, May 10, 2006 1:45 PM
Hum... water sealer. I never thought of that (though I probably shoud have!) I don't want something like "Thompsons water sealer" do I? I will see what my local Home Depot has. Thanks!

Modeling the D&H in 1984: http://dandhcoloniemain.blogspot.com/

  • Member since
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Posted by dgwinup on Wednesday, May 10, 2006 1:44 PM
I believe lacquer is still used in the automotive industry. I don't think you really want to use it on your layout.

If you want to seal the subsurface, use a decent quality acrylic enamel paint or Kilz2 water-based sealer. Both will seal your subsurface sufficiently to prevent water damage from additional scenicking. Tthe original Kilz will seal a little better, but it smells worse than the other two suggestions and the smell lasts longer.

Now, let's get those hills covered!

Darrell, quiet...for now
Darrell, quiet...for now
  • Member since
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  • From: Loudonville, NY
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Need Lacquer paint for glueshell scenery
Posted by Benjamin Maggi on Wednesday, May 10, 2006 11:50 AM
Constructed my hills using the "Glueshell" method described in the Sept. 1995 Model Railroader. Essesntially, it involves making a web of interlocking cardboard strips and then covering them with glue soaked cloth, much like paper mache + plaster cloth, but with glue instead of plaster. Less messy.

To seal the shell created, and make it waterproof (essential to those you use water-soluble techniques for attaching grass and stuff), the article recommends Lacquer paint. Problem is, I cannot find it.

Tried True Value, Home Depot, even a local paint manufacturer. So, does anyone still manufacturer lacquer paint? I don't need a lot, probably less than a pint. Would oil-based paints be a good substitute, or would they not form a water-proof barrier?

Anyone, please! I cannot stare at these barren hills forever! [:)]

Modeling the D&H in 1984: http://dandhcoloniemain.blogspot.com/

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