Trains.com

Subscriber & Member Login

Login, or register today to interact in our online community, comment on articles, receive our newsletter, manage your account online and more!

Spray to protect painted backdrop?

869 views
12 replies
1 rating 2 rating 3 rating 4 rating 5 rating
  • Member since
    November 2019
  • 349 posts
Spray to protect painted backdrop?
Posted by The Milwaukee Road Warrior on Sunday, July 17, 2022 8:24 AM

I painted my backdrop on masonite that was first primed a couple times.  I used acrylic latex paint and in the 2 years since I finished the backdrop I've managed to scrape it up in a few places while working on other things.  I thought I had read in a thread that there is a spray that can be applied that provides a protective coating to the surface.  Anyone have suggestions?

I know there are sprays to protect photo paper backdrops, just not sure about painted ones?  My final product will be a combination of painted and photo backdrops.

Thanks

Andy

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Milwaukee native modeling the Milwaukee Road in 1950's Milwaukee.

  • Member since
    July 2006
  • From: west coast
  • 7,117 posts
Posted by rrebell on Sunday, July 17, 2022 8:46 AM

With a painted backdrop it is best to just touch it up.

  • Member since
    November 2019
  • 349 posts
Posted by The Milwaukee Road Warrior on Sunday, July 17, 2022 8:56 AM

Ok, appreciate the advice!  I've done that before so I will just try to be more careful going forward.  

If anyone has info on spray protectant for the photo portion of a backdrop I'd still be interested Smile

Andy

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Milwaukee native modeling the Milwaukee Road in 1950's Milwaukee.

  • Member since
    September 2004
  • From: Dearborn Station
  • 22,938 posts
Posted by richhotrain on Sunday, July 17, 2022 8:59 AM

From what I read, you are supposed to use polymer varnish to protect acrylic latex paintings.

Rich

Alton Junction

  • Member since
    July 2006
  • From: west coast
  • 7,117 posts
Posted by rrebell on Monday, July 18, 2022 9:36 AM

richhotrain

From what I read, you are supposed to use polymer varnish to protect acrylic latex paintings.

Rich

 

Depends. There are many types some removable, some not.

  • Member since
    September 2004
  • From: Dearborn Station
  • 22,938 posts
Posted by richhotrain on Monday, July 18, 2022 10:34 AM

rrebell
 
richhotrain

From what I read, you are supposed to use polymer varnish to protect acrylic latex paintings.

Rich 

Depends. There are many types some removable, some not. 

Don't know why you would want to remove it, but the bulk of the literature indicates that polymer varnish should be used and that it is removable. 

Rich

Alton Junction

  • Member since
    February 2002
  • From: Mpls/St.Paul
  • 12,890 posts
Posted by wjstix on Monday, July 18, 2022 10:43 AM

Although we use it for different things in model railroading (like securing scenery or ballast down), matte medium was actually designed for artists to use as a protective coating on their completed paintings. 

Stix
  • Member since
    November 2019
  • 349 posts
Posted by The Milwaukee Road Warrior on Wednesday, July 20, 2022 5:13 PM

wjstix

Although we use it for different things in model railroading (like securing scenery or ballast down), matte medium was actually designed for artists to use as a protective coating on their completed paintings. 

 

How interesting!  I will have to look into that.  And Rich is right; once I put it (varnish, matte medium, or other) on its meant to be permanent.  I have no plans to remove it.

Andy

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Milwaukee native modeling the Milwaukee Road in 1950's Milwaukee.

  • Member since
    January 2017
  • From: Southern Florida Gulf Coast
  • 15,940 posts
Posted by SeeYou190 on Thursday, July 21, 2022 6:07 PM

wjstix
Matte medium was actually designed for artists to use as a protective coating on their completed paintings. 

Matte Medium, or a coat of Wallpaper Paste, both have worked very well for me.

I would imagine that Decoupage Sealer would also work very well. Maybe it is available in a spray can.

-  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -  -

EDIT

Yes, it is available in a spray:

-Kevin

Living the dream and happily modeling my STRATTON AND GILLETTE Railroad in HO scale. The SGRR is a freelanced Class A railroad as it would have appeared on Tuesday, August 3rd, 1954, in my personal fantasy world of plausible nonsense.

  • Member since
    November 2019
  • 349 posts
Posted by The Milwaukee Road Warrior on Thursday, July 21, 2022 9:26 PM

Mod Podge.. Of course..  Should have thought of that right away.  Thanks Kevin.

Andy

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Milwaukee native modeling the Milwaukee Road in 1950's Milwaukee.

  • Member since
    February 2008
  • 1,925 posts
Posted by kasskaboose on Friday, July 22, 2022 4:08 PM

Yes, damaging the backdrop happens.  Count me in for also touching it up. 

You might want to consider covering it with garbage bags that you cut along the sides and then secure with tame.

  • Member since
    May 2008
  • From: Miles City, Montana
  • 2,049 posts
Posted by FRRYKid on Saturday, July 23, 2022 3:33 AM

A little note on Matte Medium as an aside.

I have it for my lake on my layout and I have found that if you accidently leave items on top of it, it tends to dent. (And don't ask me how I know that.) Eventually I will use some of the mentioned sealer to protect it as stated in the instructions.

"The only stupid question is the unasked question."
Brain waves can power an electric train. RealFact #832 from Snapple.
  • Member since
    August 2006
  • 36 posts
Posted by santafejeff on Saturday, July 23, 2022 8:43 PM

Just like gesso is used prior to painting a canvas, the matte medium is designed to seal it after its painted. Primarily to prevent light from fading the colors but I dont see why it couldnt offer at least a degree of protection from the occasional bumping. If you bump it say, with the sharp end of a piece of rail, because your putting it on the benchwork and oops you hit the backdrop, not much is going to keep it from getting scratched. Its like parking in a parking lot with your new car, eventually the inevitable is going to happen

Subscriber & Member Login

Login, or register today to interact in our online community, comment on articles, receive our newsletter, manage your account online and more!

Users Online

Search the Community

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
Model Railroader Newsletter See all
Sign up for our FREE e-newsletter and get model railroad news in your inbox!